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E150 rear shock replacement

 
  #16  
Old 06-03-2008, 04:25 PM
pelletman
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If you guys want to not break the lower shock bolts, tighten them before you loosen them. Heat would be helpful too I think, but I did it without it.
 
  #17  
Old 06-09-2008, 04:14 PM
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Just replaces my shocks wi bilstiens, the sawzall sure made the removal of the top bolts easy!
 
  #18  
Old 12-25-2016, 08:53 AM
doneldersr1
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E150 rear shock upper nut removal

Just replaced rear shocks on 1998 E150. I used 9/16 angled box wrench to loosen nut. Then layed on back ( a lift is easier ) and after loosening nut, left box wrench on top stud and reached under, grabbed upper shock tube and starting turning clockwise to remove shock. Please remember, most upper shock extra long studs is to prevent shocks from falling out if nut comes loose. Once upper tube and nut loose, pull down on shock to remove stud. Remove and then replace in reverse. Remember, hold upper nut and start screwing counter clock-wise upper shock tube. Reinstall 9/16 box end over nut and hand tighten. Good Luck
 
  #19  
Old 12-25-2016, 08:56 AM
doneldersr1
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Please do not use heat/weld on any studs or bolts. This will weaken the metal and fatigue will set in.
 
  #20  
Old 12-25-2016, 10:51 AM
CWR032
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Surely the OP has solved his/her problem in the decade since his post.
 
  #21  
Old 12-25-2016, 01:08 PM
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Sure it's an old post but new people are joining all the time.
I used to take everything apart in the reverse sequence that It was installed. That works fine if you intend to put it back on. Now I revel in the use of air-hammers or a Sawzall. I don't own a oxyacetylene torch setup, if I did more I might look into one. "Over-whelming force" is your friend!

Heat treated so once it starts it doesn't want to stop!
 
  #22  
Old 12-25-2016, 03:16 PM
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I love my air hammer for some things.
It's amazing what you can do with one and the correct set of bits.
 
  #23  
Old 10-21-2017, 02:29 PM
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1997 E150 rear shock replacement..

My 1997 conversion van has blown shocks in the rear at 215,000 miles! So found a deal on Bilsteins at tirerack and while I have the the type of wrenches you showed, including most others known to western man, My back surgery would seem to favor pep boys install for this application. Some times it is just better to avoid the bad words and busted knuckles and defer to a younger guy.. 😎
 
  #24  
Old 07-18-2018, 08:55 PM
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ditto to jeffery

Originally Posted by jeffreyclay View Post
Sure it's an old post but new people are joining all the time.
I used to take everything apart in the reverse sequence that It was installed. That works fine if you intend to put it back on. Now I revel in the use of air-hammers or a Sawzall. I don't own a oxyacetylene torch setup, if I did more I might look into one. "Over-whelming force" is your friend!

Heat treated so once it starts it doesn't want to stop!
ditto to jeffery. first time that i looked for this answer and glad i did. info is info and e series fords are and will be on the market for years to come.
 
  #25  
Old 07-25-2018, 05:05 AM
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Very late to this thread---and yes new people are joining daily with these same sorts of questions.......

I've found rear shocks are fairly easy to cut off from under the van AND the spare tire is removed. There's a ton of room above the cross member and floor---I use a Milwaukee rotating head high-powered Sawzall with appropriate metal cutting blade, about 8-9" in length IIRC.

Front shocks are another story---when not using something like Bilstein with that upper wrench flat just under the spring perch it can be one helluva challenge. Lots of suggested how-to's but so far I've not found one that works "easy" for me.
 
  #26  
Old 07-25-2018, 12:29 PM
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yes, busted knuckles, bleeding and a lot of expletives. but was finally successful with both sets. fronts were a pain but patience was the rule and they weren't as corroded as the backs. should have thought of removing the spare. eventually used wrench on top with cheater and large channellocks on the bottom shroud. twisted the nut and rod end off this way and was then able to remove them.
 
  #27  
Old 12-26-2018, 08:07 PM
Ryan Fornkohl
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Originally Posted by demaris View Post
yes, busted knuckles, bleeding and a lot of expletives. but was finally successful with both sets. fronts were a pain but patience was the rule and they weren't as corroded as the backs. should have thought of removing the spare. eventually used wrench on top with cheater and large channellocks on the bottom shroud. twisted the nut and rod end off this way and was then able to remove them.
Originally Posted by doneldersr1 View Post
Just replaced rear shocks on 1998 E150. I used 9/16 angled box wrench to loosen nut. Then layed on back ( a lift is easier ) and after loosening nut, left box wrench on top stud and reached under, grabbed upper shock tube and starting turning clockwise to remove shock. Please remember, most upper shock extra long studs is to prevent shocks from falling out if nut comes loose. Once upper tube and nut loose, pull down on shock to remove stud. Remove and then replace in reverse. Remember, hold upper nut and start screwing counter clock-wise upper shock tube. Reinstall 9/16 box end over nut and hand tighten. Good Luck
I am replacing all four shocks. I have replaced the two front shocks without any issue using two box wrenches. Its the rear two that I cant figure out. I understand getting them off by cutting or mangling by holding with channel locks. But how do you tighten to reininstall? Is it ok to put wrench on very top nut and turn the sleeve "hand tight"? If not what is everyone using on nut under the top nut to tighten? Would a crows foot wrench work? Any ideas are appreciated. [email protected]
 
  #28  
Old 12-27-2018, 05:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Ryan Fornkohl View Post
I am replacing all four shocks. I have replaced the two front shocks without any issue using two box wrenches. Its the rear two that I cant figure out. I understand getting them off by cutting or mangling by holding with channel locks. But how do you tighten to reininstall? Is it ok to put wrench on very top nut and turn the sleeve "hand tight"? If not what is everyone using on nut under the top nut to tighten? Would a crows foot wrench work? Any ideas are appreciated. [email protected]
If you've successfully changed the front shocks without problems the rears should be a bit easier.

You want the upper nuts tight enough to squeeze the upper and lower rubber bushings. Not sure if your shocks included locking nuts but not adequately compressing the bushings could lead to the nuts loosening during driving making the shocks almost useless---they'd flop around in the mounting hole and not absorb/rebound axle movement.

I use Bilstein mostly because they have relatively large wrench flats at the bottom of the upper stud making installation and eventual removal "easy". Accessing the upper nuts with a flex head ratcheting wrench works well, if your brand shocks don't have that secondary wrench flat and have that outer tube or shield a strap wrench might hold it while tightening those upper nuts. Doing all this behind the rear cross member is where I find the most room, as mentioned removing the spare helps greatly.

Just as a bit of info look for shocks that have the wrench flats at the bottoms of the threaded stem---that is the single best advance in R&I'ing shocks I've ever seen. Also use some anti-seize on those upper stems---makes removal next time much, much easier.

HTH
 
  #29  
Old 03-11-2019, 02:07 PM
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Rear shocks.

Originally Posted by Truck Builder 1 View Post
Has anybody tried to replace rear shocks on a late model E150, in their garage, with the usual do-it-yourselfer's tools? I was/am considering this, but I was just under the van and found it very cramped to even see and touch the upper(rod end) nuts, much less get a tool on them. Mine is a 2002, nothing special about the rear suspension. Any tips? All comments welcome, including those that I'd be nuts (no pun intended) to try this.
just did mine today. I attempted to work them loose with wrenches but there was very little space and the nuts were well rusted and frozen in place. After a little research I just broke out the reciprocating saw and used a 9inch metal blade to cut the nut off of the top. Removing the tire helps with clearing the saw but not absolutely necessary (although recommended). Also before attempting to saw off the nut I freed the bottom bolt of the shock so it could swing down giving me a better angle on the top nut.(PB blaster recommended prior to this step). Broke one blade trying to force it along too fast through the top rubber bushing. Worked slower with the next blade and started my cut directly at base of the nut instead of through the bushing and it ate through rather quickly. Reinstall went smoothly. I used a ratchet wrench with a flexible neck- made the angle easier and helped me not round the nut. Took me about 40 minutes per side. First side took longer bc I was figuring the sequence out. Jack stands and a quality jack were extremely helpful and as always, take your time and be safe!
 
 
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