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stupid rotted brake lines

 
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Old 10-12-2011, 06:49 PM
V X
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stupid rotted brake lines

Hi all,
Is it a do it yourself job to replace brake lines. Never done it before or even seen it done. Special tools required? Will the auto parts store know exactly what I need? Are these questions answering my question?(don't do it)
Sort of handy and might have someone with more knowledge about this than me available for guidance.
Thanks in advance for your knowledge.
 
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Old 10-12-2011, 07:41 PM
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Are you asking about the metal brake lines or the rubber brake hoses?
 
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Old 10-12-2011, 07:43 PM
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I've not done this on an Ex, but on other vehicles. It's not difficult, just takes time. Being **** is better than doing a fast, sloppy job. Drain as much as possible of the fluid from the system (it easily removes paint), shape your new brakeline to exactly match the removed piece, flair (put the nut on first - doh) the ends (special tool is needed - they can be $40 to $400) and move on to the next section. Part store will have these in standard sizes, but the Ex might need a longer section. Didn't someone post a brake line supplier recently here? Certainly not a high-tech job. Bleed the brakes when done. Why not R&R the master brake cylinder while everything is apart? Then you're sure of no future issues. I used steel lines and painted them with a brush (to keep the rust down) after assembly.
 
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Old 10-12-2011, 07:45 PM
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Originally Posted by the ponz View Post
Are you asking about the metal brake lines or the rubber brake hoses?
Good question, I assumed steel.
 
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Old 10-12-2011, 07:50 PM
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Thanks for the replies. Yes steel but will check the rubber while under there. And I would rather err on the side of **** rather than rush, just no need. Have not seen what exactly the problem is as my son has the truck and is 200 miles away but will look into the issues this weekend. Can only hope for weather like last weekend!
 
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Old 10-12-2011, 07:59 PM
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So I assume the lines do not come pre-flared or bent? and with all the needed hardware. This is not an unbolt then bolt on and add fluid and bleed operation?
 
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Old 10-12-2011, 08:25 PM
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Good idea to replace the steel lines. My rear line when out while out of state with the family, talk about a long day.
 
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Old 10-12-2011, 08:33 PM
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You can't buy pre-shaped brake lines. You can buy lengths or a bulk roll of brake line. You'll have to make each piece.
 
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Old 10-12-2011, 09:36 PM
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1. Buy the brake line from these folks in Atlanta. It never rusts, bends easier than steel, and is fully DOT approved. It is about the best you can get. Copper/nickle alloy. More expensive, but you never have to worry about them again. I am putting this under my truck during this winters upgrades.


Federal Hill Trading Company



2. Get these bending tools as a set. Pretty much does it all.

Tubing Bender and Forming Pliers Kit - Tubing Bender Pliers - Pliers for Tubing






3. Shop around for a double flare tool. The Sears Craftsman and the Ridjid units have a good reputation.



Amazon.com: Ridgid 23332 Flaring Tool: Home Improvement




I have this one and it works real good, but pricy as hell. I figured I would pay less for the tooling and line to put things in myself in one vehicle than I would have to pay a shop to do it. And I get the tools to keep, so I spent the money.

Amazon.com: K-Tool International (KTI70081) Brake Pipe Flaring Tool: Automotive


 
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Old 10-12-2011, 10:06 PM
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Thanks guys, I'm sure as we get into this I'll have tons of questions. I do have a tubing bender, no forming pliers, and access to flaring tool.
 
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Old 10-13-2011, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by housedad View Post




OOooOOOooo, I like those blue handled quick bend pliers! Looks like a nice fast easy tool to use and it can bend right up against fittings nicely. Imma have to get me one of those!
 
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Old 10-13-2011, 10:33 AM
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The pliers are nice but you can crimp lines with them if you try to bend too much with them - it will also nick the line a bit but it isn't a huge deal. For the brake line - I recommend the copper nickel line. It's soft enough to get nice bends with and it flares easily with most tools.
 
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Old 10-14-2011, 08:10 AM
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Go to Bronco Graveyard
Early Bronco Restoration Full Size Bronco Restoration Classic Ford Bronco Parts For Sale
Order a set of pre-bent Stainless Steel Lines. I know Rust Living in Erie PA, all I see in Winter is Salt Salt and more Salt
only thing i needed to do for my 1993 F150 4x4 was go to Advanced autoparts for a Adapter. only one of the fittings was wrong.

Other than that it was the eaisest thing in the world to do and no more Rust to worry about and Pedal feels 100% better
 
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Old 11-02-2011, 04:15 PM
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Well my son took the truck to his voc school (towed it -love AAA) and the future mechanics of America replaced lines, rotors, pads, calipers, e-brake cable, and on and on and on so I still have no experience replaceing any of that stuff but they did a great job and for short $$. Thanks for all the replies.
 
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Old 11-03-2011, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by tdappleman View Post
The pliers are nice but you can crimp lines with them if you try to bend too much with them - it will also nick the line a bit but it isn't a huge deal. For the brake line - I recommend the copper nickel line. It's soft enough to get nice bends with and it flares easily with most tools.
I hadnt thought of the copper/nickel lines. What are the pro's/con's vs. stainless? It would be much easier to work with. I always think of the copper for water. Where do you find it?

Nevermind, got off my lazy butt and searched. Here is one place:
Federal Hill Trading Company
 

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