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2015 Battery life

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Old 11-16-2018, 05:42 AM
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2015 Battery life

Mine died today after 3 years and left me looking for a jump
Its sad,nothing lasts like the old days,5 years was the standard
I am used too..
 
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Old 11-16-2018, 05:55 AM
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My OEM only lasted 2 years. I have one year on it’s replacement. We’ll see how long it lasts.
 
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Old 11-16-2018, 08:07 AM
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I believe in general it's partly the anti-theft modules, clocks, stereos, remote start and other gee-gaws and black boxes that tend to run for quite a while after shutdown, sometimes as much as a half hour or more. There are a ****-ton of accessories and power robbing devices these days that draw a very slight current. This is now considered "normal." The battery is probably always slightly discharged/undercharged. Not in a major way but it's enough, causing sulfation the #1 battery killer. In the really "old days" batteries probably had a 1 year warranty or so at best and needed watering several times a year. Maintenance-free batteries changed all that. But in those days when you shut off the truck, the amp draw was Zero. Could come back 6 months later and it would at least start. Not anymore. High underhood temperatures also contribute, engine bays are packed today with barely any room.

Charge up the battery to 100%, and esp. if the truck isn't used for a few days, check the voltage at the posts, it will be noticeably down from 100% I bet. A tenth or two of a volt doesn't sound like much but as a percentage of battery charge it is a lot. If you want them to last in modern cars and trucks they will need some attention with outboard chargers & maintainers. No way around it. Or be prepared to swap them out on a regular basis.
 
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Old 11-16-2018, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Excelerater View Post
Mine died today after 3 years and left me looking for a jump
Its sad,nothing lasts like the old days,5 years was the standard
I am used too..
For your replacement, go with Northstar. A little pricey but they`re worth it . American made with a 4 year warranty.
Part# NSBG650001
 
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Old 11-16-2018, 11:00 AM
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I've never had a new Ford where the battery lasted more than 3 years. My daughter's 2015 Fusion just needed a new battery, less than 30K miles on the clock.

I've purchased only MC Maxx batteries, they have a 99 month warranty and that pretty much beats the industry.
 
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Old 11-16-2018, 11:05 AM
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I agree with Tedster. There are a ton of parasitic loads on the battery these days, and if your driving habits are relatively short hauls, the battery may never get recharged enough. Ours is ~~ 3-1/2 years now, but because we live far from town, most of our drives are a minimum of 1 hour. So we've not done anything special, and I expect our battery will get a typical life of around 5 years.
 
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Old 11-16-2018, 01:06 PM
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I change mine every three years. Forgot about it in one truck and it died in me in the 37th month.

Not really too bad of a cost over a three year period.


 
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Old 11-16-2018, 03:39 PM
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Arrow

In today's modern world, 36 to 48 months sounds about right. I always check if a "heavy duty" battery is an option for my model vehicle...and opt for the heavy duty. As an example, my Honda Civic had a heavy duty battery option for the folks that lived up in the North COLD part of the country. I added that same battery type/size.

Besides, I really have never had good luck with OEM batteries on new vehicles. Once I buy off the shelf at the dealer, those batteries seem to last longer. I agree...that Motorcraft has a decent warranty period if purchased from the dealer.


biz
 
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Old 11-16-2018, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by GlueGuy View Post
I agree with Tedster. There are a ton of parasitic loads on the battery these days, and if your driving habits are relatively short hauls, the battery may never get recharged enough. Ours is ~~ 3-1/2 years now, but because we live far from town, most of our drives are a minimum of 1 hour. So we've not done anything special, and I expect our battery will get a typical life of around 5 years.
This is an excellent point. A little off topic but, in my mail truck, I deliver mainly to apartments and just two walking streets. My truck literally has no more continuous run time than say 5 minutes and with all the starts and stops, I normally go through two batteries per year.

So about 9 months ago I started letting my truck idle during my lunch break (30 minutes). I've been able to extend the life of a single battery by about 6 months but I'm burning more fuel. Just can't win.
 
  #10  
Old 11-16-2018, 04:48 PM
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Also worth mentioning as the battery ages the BMS will refuse to charge it completely. I highly advise resetting the BMS. Also the BMS will re learn a new battery after 8 hours but it will not reset the BMS timeline and it will cause lack of charging and system shutdown messages.
 
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Old 11-16-2018, 05:07 PM
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Newer vehicles have more parasitic drains and are harder on batteries than older ones. If a person hooked up a battery maintainer overnight one night a week, i think the battery would last a lot longer. That's a hassle, so most people just replace fairly often.
 
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Old 11-16-2018, 06:32 PM
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So letís expand this chat a bit. I have the following noted on my phone (my truck notes):

Battery Voltage and State of Charge:
  • 12.6v - 100%
  • 12.4v - 75%
  • 12.2v - 50%
  • 12.0v - 25%
  • 11.8v - 0%

Does this look accurate? I think I got it here, but maybe from the Internet.

If this is accurate, at what point would you recommend preemptively replacing a battery? Iím coming up on four years with my truck and it shows 12.4v after a good drive/charge. I was figuring when it gave me a 12.2v reading it was time to replace.
 
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Old 11-16-2018, 06:51 PM
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Originally Posted by onug View Post
So letís expand this chat a bit. I have the following noted on my phone (my truck notes):

Battery Voltage and State of Charge:
  • 12.6v - 100%
  • 12.4v - 75%
  • 12.2v - 50%
  • 12.0v - 25%
  • 11.8v - 0%

Does this look accurate? I think I got it here, but maybe from the Internet.

If this is accurate, at what point would you recommend preemptively replacing a battery? Iím coming up on four years with my truck and it shows 12.4v after a good drive/charge. I was figuring when it gave me a 12.2v reading it was time to replace.
State of charge is nice to know, but isn't what tells you the battery won't take a full charge and have the Depth of charge to keep working. And not many are willing to charge up a battery and check the electrolyte itself, as that is a better indicator of the health of the battery. I only started coming up to visit you guys as I was helping a friend buy a new F150 (which he loves), but down in 6.0 land we have a lot of extra loads at start up, so we talk about bigger output alternators and things like overdrive pulleys to help keep electronics happy and batteries charged.

Much talk of either of those up here?

Scott
 
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Old 11-16-2018, 06:55 PM
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What kind of battery? 12.65 volts is 100% charged at 77į F, but, that is an obsolete number for the old school basic lead-acid type battery with the filler caps to add water.

Modern "maintenance free" batteries use a different plate alloy with calcium, a different chemistry. They have a fully charged open circuit voltage of 12.80 volts at 77į F. If you measure a maintenance free type battery reading 12.65 volts it's only about 75% charged. This is also the discharge level where permanent sulfation begins.

The open circuit voltage is only part of the story though. Battery has to both accept, and hold, a charge in order to be considered good. A battery can also test OK for voltage with a meter but it might choke under any kind of load.

An easy test is to first remove any surface charge. Turn the headlights on high for 5 minutes. Then wait at least 10 minutes or overnight. Measure the voltage across the posts. That is the true open circuit voltage and level of charge. If you can safely disable the ignition crank the engine starter for about ten to fifteen seconds while measuring the voltage at the battery posts. A good battery will not drop below 9.6 volts at 77į F. Then wait another ten minutes or so. The battery voltage should "bounce back" to the correct OCV. The capacity will be less, though not the voltage, if the battery is good. Put the charger on the battery to get it back to its happy place. If it passes those tests it should be good for a while. Maybe...
 
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Old 11-16-2018, 07:12 PM
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My first simple test is to charge the battery fully with a smart charger (like CTEK or NOCO), and THEN disconnect from charger and let it sit overnight. if the resting voltage is less than 12.8, I'm worried. SOME vehicles have surprisingly large parasitic draws, so if you have battery issues, you may want to do these tests with the battery disconnected from the vehicle to rule that out.
 

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