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6.0L Power Stroke Diesel 2003 - 2007 F250, F350 pickup and F350+ Cab Chassis, 2003 - 2005 Excursion and 2003 - 2009 van

Electrical Glitches / Electrical / Electronic Diagnostics / Fixes Thread.

 
  #16  
Old 02-28-2010, 01:16 PM
theonlypheonix
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Originally Posted by gearloose1 View Post
WARNING:

THERE ARE POSTS THAT SUGGEST USING A PRODUCT CALLED OXY-GARD.

DO NOT USE THIS PRODUCT.

IT IS A CONDUCTIVE GREASE AND THE MANUFACTURER CONFIRMED IT WILL SHORT OUT ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS.

IT IS NOT INTENDED FOR AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS USE.
Ox-Gard is a GB product, what material data sheet do you personally have which supports ANY of your claims which as stated above constitutes misinformation. One would think that common sense would tell you that a conductive paste (including heat sink thermal compounds) would NOT be wise to slather all over "electronic circuits" whether automotive or general use. However the application of a compound specifically design to prevent oxidation on electrical conductors can be appropriate as to the intended desgined application to "conductors".

Why is it not for "automotive applications"? Does GB limit its application in any warning notice to advise as "not for automotive use"? Or is that because its melting point is only 400 F (203C)? Or is there some chemistry that you believe is incompatable in the automotive environment? If your conductors exceed 400F I would think your vehicle is on fire and you would have serious electronic probelms as solder melts at 387F and most automotive electronic components are only rated up to 125C. Certainly one woud not use it as an anti-sieze grease on exhaust manifold nuts/bolts!

GB suggests that properly applied Ox-Gard is appropriate for electrical CONDUCTORS (as it is electrically conductive) as an aid in preventing oxidation of electrical CONDUCTORS. Further their printed material did not place any restriction on whether the electircal conductors are used in the general electrical field or electrical conductors as found in the automotive field. Once again per GBs data sheet Ox-Gards melting temp is 400F.

There have been posters on this board suggesting that silver filled heat sink thermal grease/compounds are appropriate for use on automotive connectors/electrical conductors. Even though this type of compound can be labeled as a "grease", this type of product would be inappropriate on any connector. Note that NO manufacturer of these compounds recommend application to any electrical connector/electrical conductor, as it sole advertised application is for thermal conduction on heat sinks. There are no claims as to lubrication properties for connector rubber seals and no claims to prevent oxidation on electrical conductors. Lastly note some of these thermal compounds can also act as a glue which can also be undesirable in application to connectors.

Serveral base types of thermal compounds products are available, some are more of an insulator (ceramic and "snaazy" diamond filled) and some are more of a conductor (silver filled) all depends on their entire chemisrty package. On an electrical conductor one would not want to apply an insulator which is where Ox-Gard (slightly conductive) excels as an oxidation prevention on conductors but yet NOT an insulator. Note that if one were to put their ohm meter leads into a pile of Ox-Gard, on a 20 meg ohm scale the ohm meter would read OPEN CIRCUIT. So... its conduction is very minimal at best and certainly does not rasie to the level of a SHORT CIRCUIT! Ox-Gards only purpose as GB states and when used as recommended, is on electrical conductors as found in the electrical world in application up to hundreds of Volts, to aid in preventing oxidation of the conductor. Despite some posters misconceptions it is not intended to be used to lubricate or to improve on the sealing capabilities of the rubber seals found in any electrical connector.

One needs to discern between lubricating properties for rubber seals and electrical conduction of the electrical conductors.

 
  #17  
Old 03-01-2010, 01:36 AM
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OX-GARD, the BEST KEPT SECRET

Originally Posted by gearloose1 View Post
WARNING:

THERE ARE POSTS THAT SUGGEST USING A PRODUCT CALLED OXY-GARD.

DO NOT USE THIS PRODUCT.

IT IS A CONDUCTIVE GREASE AND THE MANUFACTURER CONFIRMED IT WILL SHORT OUT ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS.

IT IS NOT INTENDED FOR AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS USE.

OX-GARD ... described as the best kept secret in the electrical industry! Don't rely on amateurs, see for yourself and make your OWN decision.

OxGard

My error in mis-spelling the products brand name (I was thinking Oxi-Clean), I apologize if I confused anyone.
 
  #18  
Old 04-02-2010, 10:52 AM
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Electronic Glitches / Bad Contacts and CEL / DTCs

What to do when your engine throws a Check Engine / Wrench Light


If you get the wrench light, go directly to repair.

However, if you get the Check Engine Light (CEL) and want to be adventurous, don't panic.

Often the CEL is set by software glitches, spurious signals, electrostatic electricity, momentary shorts, dirt, dust, "whiskers" of conductive solder, wiring / connector faults, or any of many things.

However, many CELs will place the vehicle in a form of a "limp mode", not as severe as the "wrench" but still sizable degradtions of performance.

For example, the EGR codes P0405 will considerably degrade performance. However, I have managed to reset it, and it worked fine --- until I ultimately isolated the fault in the EGR stick under hot conditions.

Often, several CEL codes will be set without any clarity as to whether you have one fault, an upstream fault that sets many codes, but tell you very little as to the root cause --- the one you want to fix.


Most of the time, CELs can be cleared with a cheap $50 code reader.


Hence, when the CEL comes on, there is no need to panic.

Pull over, get out your code reader, and log all the codes, the operating conditions (ambient temperature, how hot, how cold, whether engine warm, cold, hot, towing, highway, city, etc.)

Then see what the code is. If it does not appear to be a "drop dead now" code, clear it and keep going.


Following this procedure, over time, you will build up a log of what, where, when, how codes appear, giving you valuable diagnostic information.


If this is not done, taking a vehicle to a garage with a CEL will basically invite them to spend time doing what you could have done yourself all along.

Garages make money when yo bring the car in, and they are rewarded for "fixing" the problem the first time.

So they are likely to take any code (even just one) and do "what it takes" to get the code to go away.

That can mean unnecessary repairs.


No doublt, early on in the 6.0's life, many a turbos, EGR valves, etc. got replaced because it "coded".

Few diesel technicians will want to see a customer walk out the door with a $100 bill for turning off the CEL and telling them to come back to see them the next time it happens.

If you are traveling / on the road / and not a truck driver / professional, getting work outside of your home town is a challenge --- what incentive do the repair shop have to let you get out the door without a very expensive repair bill if they are likely to never see you again?


Better to read and log the code, erase it, and see if it happens again --- or wait until you got home.
 
  #19  
Old 04-03-2010, 09:39 AM
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Cheap $50 code reader that can read basic codes, reset code:

https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/9...ml#post8721372
 
  #20  
Old 04-03-2010, 11:27 AM
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Added to the Tech Folder since some of us are electrically impaired. All I ask in return is that you electricians play nice.....
 
  #21  
Old 04-03-2010, 01:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Maxium4x4 View Post
Added to the Tech Folder since some of us are electrically impaired. All I ask in return is that you electricians play nice.....


Honored to be on the tech list!


I have on my work in bin adding write ups on:


A) why electrical glitches happen:

- conductive dust

- bad solder / tin whiskering

- EMF interference

- Software faults

- Latching (frozen ICs because of excessive voltage)



B) Electronics / Software Failure Analysis



Feel free to add ideas to my work pile...
 
  #22  
Old 04-04-2010, 12:01 PM
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Cruise Control Deactivation Switch Failure - 2003 onwards

Almost all the issues are in the cruise control deactivation switch.

This is the switch under the brake master cylinder that was recalled on all Fords because it caused fires.

The new, redesigned switch also have a habit of prematurely failure --- fortunately, not causing fires.

If your cruise will not engage or seem to have trouble, it is the first place to fix.

See.

https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/9...e-350-v10.html
 
  #23  
Old 04-05-2010, 04:49 PM
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well i have one for ya see if you can help battery 's are good nothing going to pcm no info on scanner downloader back to stock not turning over at all but have power what do you think
 
  #24  
Old 04-05-2010, 05:16 PM
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Originally Posted by dsirekis View Post
well i have one for ya see if you can help battery 's are good nothing going to pcm no info on scanner downloader back to stock not turning over at all but have power what do you think
1. repost in the main thread so more people see this - lots of people on there that knows more than I do.

2. Do a reset as per instructions above.

3. Tech file on no start.
 
  #25  
Old 04-18-2010, 09:03 AM
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Why older vehicles have more glitches - Sensors wear out

Here is the first post on this issue.

Gist: your sensors do wear out like any wear part.

However, right now, the auto industry have not a single sensor listed to be periodically replaced as "regular maintenance".

It is unrealistic to expect every sensors to last much past 100,000 miles, so if your vehicle is over 100,000 miles, consider replacing the most critical / wear prone sensors in one sitting.


https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/9...ml#post8782837
 
  #26  
Old 04-18-2010, 01:52 PM
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I have a question you might know. So I am in the coast guard and went out to sea for 2 weeks. Before I left my reverse indicator was working just fine. when I got home it doesnt work. If I push the button P while i am in Reverse the OFF light just stays lit. But lets say I go into Park i can toggle the OFF light on and off. any thoughts?
 
  #27  
Old 04-18-2010, 08:53 PM
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Gear..

Great stuff here. Keep on clearing codes and compiling the data. Great to talk to you the other day

Regards
 
  #28  
Old 04-30-2010, 06:27 AM
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FICM Issues / Mods

Who is the suspected (not yet confirmed) OEM?


It is Via Systems:

Markets | Automotive


OEM made for Navistar.



-------------------------------------------


"Hot" high voltage FICM mod (58V) warning

See here;


https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/9...ml#post8823091

Or consult the original Dieselstop thread:

Swamps Diesel Hot FICM Tests - TheDieselGarage.com
 

Last edited by gearloose1; 04-30-2010 at 09:39 AM. Reason: Correct re 6.7 no FICM thanks to SteveBicks
  #29  
Old 05-01-2010, 03:30 AM
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  #30  
Old 05-01-2010, 07:47 AM
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Theonlyphoenix is the same poster that resulted in a Warning Message on this thread about OxyGard.



Originally Posted by gearloose1 View Post
This poster has repeatedly posted false and misleading information.

My specific recommendation is "dielectric thermal compound".

The poster refers to a range of thermal compounds that are specifically conductive.


The poster have previously advised using Oxy-Gard on Ford Truck Connectors and contacts, which WILL SHORT CIRCUIT ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS IF USED.

THERE IS NOW A WARNING MESSAGE ABOUT NEVER USING OXY-GARD AS SUGGESTED BY THIS POSTER ON MY "ELECTRICAL BUG FIX" LINK BELOW.


BEWARE

https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/9...ml#post8574775
 

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