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pinging/sensor

 
  #1  
Old 09-01-2006, 02:14 PM
desrcr
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pinging/sensor

This is my last ditch before going diesel (if its going to rattle, I want it to OK)
I have welded/shimmed all rattles and my V10 still pings, so I am going to replace the sensor that detects detonation.
I was hoping for a detailed picture or description of where its located.
I tow 10k with small babies in the truck so reliability is definatly king.
If this doesnt work, I will sell/trade away at a loss for reliability.
 
  #2  
Old 09-01-2006, 04:05 PM
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Arrow

How have you tried to correct the "ping"?

The knock sensor is under the intake manifold...according to a post, the intake manifold does not need to be removed to replace the sensor. Check the thread...it is all in there.

ON EDIT: You may want to read this thread. Has lots of good info! https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/4...highlight=ping

Good luck...

biz

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Last edited by biz4two; 09-01-2006 at 04:36 PM.
  #3  
Old 09-01-2006, 04:25 PM
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Diesels "rattle' too ya know.

Has the rattle ever left you stranded??
 
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Old 09-01-2006, 04:49 PM
desrcr
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Originally Posted by Monsta
Diesels "rattle' too ya know.

Has the rattle ever left you stranded??
So detentation is ok until it leaves me stranded?
I live in an area where to get anywhere I have long grades in all directions.
Climbing is nerve rattling enough without the constant pedal search away from the detenation.
The things I have tried besides exhaust and trans plate.....91 octane fuel filter and techron for injectors and carbon buildup.
It will go in next week for a thorough inspection/scan.
A deisels rattle is ok,a gasser detenating is bad.
Answers not insults.
 
  #5  
Old 09-01-2006, 04:52 PM
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I can certainly relate to your frustration. I have a 2001 V10 and it pings merrily away in OD anytime the temp is over 90 degrees. I have changed and checked everything, and it has no codes. It does burn oil, which I believe is very unusual in these engines, so I am guessing that damage has been or is being done. Higher octane does help a bit, but I'm not going that route. Good luck solving the mystery, let me know if you do.
 
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Old 09-01-2006, 05:02 PM
desrcr
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Originally Posted by heavyiron
I can certainly relate to your frustration. I have a 2001 V10 and it pings merrily away in OD anytime the temp is over 90 degrees. I have changed and checked everything, and it has no codes. It does burn oil, which I believe is very unusual in these engines, so I am guessing that damage has been or is being done. Higher octane does help a bit, but I'm not going that route. Good luck solving the mystery, let me know if you do.
Mine burns little if anyy oil which in itself is good for 128k.
I wish I could solve it, A new truck does'nt set well with my SO. She's the only reason I haven't traded yet.........0% financing sounds good to me.
I will relate anything I find.
 
  #7  
Old 09-01-2006, 05:48 PM
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How's about your Egr valve? Have you checked it? It will give you terrible pinging on a load especially.
 
  #8  
Old 09-01-2006, 05:55 PM
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Year's of "bad gas" will build up high amounts of carbon in the egr valve.You sometimes can "clean" them up,bye chipping the carbon away,but if the trucks a keeper, I would just throw a new one on.Make sure you don't damage the gasket.
 
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Old 09-01-2006, 06:16 PM
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Originally Posted by desrcr
Answers not insults.
Shame you took it as an insult. It certainly wasn't intended to be one.

~~~~~~~~~~~

How 'bout some details like the year & miles.

Does your truck even have an EGR? Most do not unless you like in a "smog" state.
 
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Old 09-01-2006, 06:17 PM
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Originally Posted by crazyrwe
Year's of "bad gas" will build up high amounts of carbon in the egr valve.You sometimes can "clean" them up,bye chipping the carbon away,but if the trucks a keeper, I would just throw a new one on.Make sure you don't damage the gasket.
I'll try anything.........how do I know if its bad? .....should I just replace and see?
Sorry sig not showing??????????
1999 cc lwb drw 4x4 128k mi Peoples Rupublic of California
 

Last edited by desrcr; 09-01-2006 at 06:37 PM.
  #11  
Old 09-01-2006, 06:33 PM
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A new MAS fixed my ping but it cost me almost $500 at the dealer. I had loss of power & over heating as well (temperature must be close to 90 dregees though) pulling a travel trailer. It does just fine in cool weather or without the trailer. Since it is only it the 60's now, I am waiting for warmer weather to hookup the trailer & test it out again.
 
  #12  
Old 09-01-2006, 08:08 PM
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Let's start with that golden oldie, the single diaphragm EGR valve. It consists of a spring-loaded diaphragm that is connected to a pintle and seat by a slender steel shaft. Normally closed by spring tension, as it receives ported vacuum, the diaphragm rises, which pulls the pintle off its seat and enables exhaust to flow into the valve's chamber and then on to the intake manifold. To test this component, use a hand-held vacuum pump connected to the vacuum nipple to raise and hold the diaphragm. About eight inches of vacuum should do the trick. The valve should hold vacuum and raise the pintle in a linear fashion. When the engine is idling, pumping it up should stall the engine. This type of valve may or may not have vacuum modulation. Remember, vacuum modulation to the EGR is a vital ingredient of good driveability and precise NOx control. This type of EGR valve is used with a thermal vacuum switch and maybe an inline vacuum delay valve.

The positive back pressure EGR valve can be identified by the letter "P" stamped next to the part number and date code. A back pressure valve is easy to spot because its pintle shaft is much thicker than the single diaphragm type. This is so because the shaft is hollow. The hollow design allows exhaust gases to flow into the shaft and push up on it. When positive back pressure in the exhaust system is sufficient, the shaft raises up and seals the built-in control valve. Once the control valve is closed, it allows applied vacuum to pull up on the diaphragm. Without back pressure to lift the hollow shaft and close the control valve opening, the EGR valve will not hold vacuum. It is bled off to the atmosphere. This design thus modulates EGR flow by modulating the applied vacuum. As engine load increases, so does engine back pressure, which causes the control valve inside the EGR to trap vacuum and open up. To test this valve, bring the engine up to 2,000 rpms to create back pressure, then apply vacuum. EGR should open and cause a 100 rpm drop or more. Exhaust leaks or a modified exhaust system can create havoc here. Adding dual exhaust or headers on a car designed for a single exhaust will reduce back pressure and set a Code 32 on GM cars. Positive back pressure EGR valves are used in simple vacuum controlled systems, as well as more complex pulse width modulated applications.

EGR solenoids are used with all types of EGR valves, especially back pressure type valves. The EGR solenoid will have two or more vacuum lines and an electrical connector. The solenoid also has an air bleed and sometimes an air filter. Vacuum is bled off through the filter vent. The PCM uses the solenoid to regulate vacuum to the EGR valve. The vacuum can be manifold or ported vacuum. The solenoid is a vacuum switch with inlet and outlet vacuum ports. The PCM calculates intended EGR flow from various other inputs and then sends a pulsed "on/off" signal to the solenoid. No vacuum flows until commanded by the PCM. This signal turns the vacuum on and off in rapid succession. This is called "pulse width modulation." If the filter becomes clogged, the vacuum cannot bleed off and too strong a signal will be sent to the valve. If that happens, the EGR valve will open too much and cause a driveability problem.
 
  #13  
Old 09-01-2006, 08:56 PM
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Wow, that was very informative. I need to go check to se if I have one and if I do, I think I will replace it.
 
  #14  
Old 09-01-2006, 10:03 PM
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My son and daughter in law bought a new Taurus in 99 with the same problem. It would ping with anything less than 91 octane and the dealer on many occasions would just add octane boost and send it back out on the road saying it was "fixed." They got an attorney and sued under the "lemon law" and Ford bought it back........they bought an Accord. Then a few months later I was reading that Ford had recalled several 99 Taurus because of a bad Mass Air Flow Sensor!!! This could very well be your problem on the V10! Call Detroit, threaten litigation, get mean!
 
  #15  
Old 09-02-2006, 07:40 AM
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Being a '99 with 128k miles, I don't think there's a case for "litigation".

Does the truck ping all the time- even on flat ground? How bad is the ping?

If you only get pre-detonation when towing &/or going up a grade, then this may be "normal". Ford states that light pinging is to be expected when the engine is under heavy load.
 

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