Go Back   Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums > Performance, Engines & Troubleshooting > Other Ford Engines > 4 Cylinder Engines
Sign in using an external account
Register Forgot Password?


Welcome to Ford-Trucks Forums!
Welcome to Ford-Trucks.com.

You are currently viewing our forums as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join the Ford-Trucks Forums community today!





 
Reply
 
 
 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 06-27-2012, 01:44 AM
Rifle Rifle is offline
Freshman User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 43
Rifle is starting off with a positive reputation.
Righty Loosely Lefty Tightly Mistake

Yeah, so to start out with I have a 2005, 4 cylinder, 2.3l engine, 2x4, Ford Ranger, and is just about at the 70,000 mile mark. Long story short here is the problem…Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.
fficeffice" />>I going to take it the auto-mechanic this morning; any idea if it’s going to be and easy fix to loosen the oil plug, or what the price point might be?>>
>
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-27-2012, 01:44 PM
tomw tomw is offline
Postmaster
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: suburban atlanta
Posts: 4,132
tomw has a very good reputation on FTE.tomw has a very good reputation on FTE.tomw has a very good reputation on FTE.
I would get a set of ViceGrips, find the appropriate size that will fit into the niche, and clamp onto the head of the plug. Rotate COUNTER-CLOCKWISE. Lefty Loosey...
You should be able to break it free, and replace it with a new one from FoMoCo or an auto parts store. Do NOT get one that cuts its own threads. Some have slices cut into the 'tip' of the bolt, and they will cut new threads which you don't need, as the threads you currently have are holding tight even with all the twisting you did.
Get factory OEM or equivalent, with correct threads.
You could also try a twelve point socket, next size up, crammed onto the head with a hammer to break it loose. When you have it out, you can work the plug out of the socket. May be a six point would fit. Try english {inch} as you may find one of them is just the right size to fit over your mess. There IS enough to grab onto with a wrench, and any mech that charges an arm and a leg to remove the drain plug is taking advantage.
If you do take it to a shop, BRING your OWN replacement drain that you know is correct, as many will try to use what they have on hand. This plug stays with you for the life of the truck and you don't want to mess it up with stuff pulled out of someone's junk box...
tom
__________________
It's not how hard you work, it's how much you get done. Simplificate and add lightness

Last edited by tomw; 06-27-2012 at 01:46 PM. Reason: add
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-29-2012, 12:53 AM
fixnair's Avatar
fixnair fixnair is offline
Posting Guru
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Bakersfield Ca.& Anaheim
Posts: 1,547
fixnair has a very good reputation on FTE.fixnair has a very good reputation on FTE.fixnair has a very good reputation on FTE.fixnair has a very good reputation on FTE.
fixnair
Another trick is to smack it hard with a heavy hammer. This will often compress the gasket under the plug and cause the threads to loosen up. The trick is getting enough of a swing at it.

It may be beneficial to put a socket, larger than the hex, up against the domed part of the plug so as to distribute the force.
__________________
2002 F350 7.3 Ltr. 6sp.DRW 270K miles, 13' service body
1952 F1 flathead Project Truck
2008 Lincoln MKX

need thermostat housing & cab 4 project

Last edited by fixnair; 06-29-2012 at 12:55 AM. Reason: Add'l info
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-29-2012, 08:14 AM
tomw tomw is offline
Postmaster
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: suburban atlanta
Posts: 4,132
tomw has a very good reputation on FTE.tomw has a very good reputation on FTE.tomw has a very good reputation on FTE.
fixnair would you do that to a plug with a steel threads in a cast aluminum pan ? I would not know how hard to whack it. Just me. Can't speak for anyone else.
tom
__________________
It's not how hard you work, it's how much you get done. Simplificate and add lightness
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-29-2012, 10:38 AM
fixnair's Avatar
fixnair fixnair is offline
Posting Guru
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Bakersfield Ca.& Anaheim
Posts: 1,547
fixnair has a very good reputation on FTE.fixnair has a very good reputation on FTE.fixnair has a very good reputation on FTE.fixnair has a very good reputation on FTE.
fixnair
You would have to sneak up on it. By that I mean start out by hitting it mildly hard to begin with and save the heavy blows if the softer blows do not get it.
To answer your question, yes I would hit a steel plug into an aluminum housing and have done so many times.
__________________
2002 F350 7.3 Ltr. 6sp.DRW 270K miles, 13' service body
1952 F1 flathead Project Truck
2008 Lincoln MKX

need thermostat housing & cab 4 project
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-29-2012, 04:36 PM
Rifle Rifle is offline
Freshman User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 43
Rifle is starting off with a positive reputation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomw View Post
I would get a set of ViceGrips, find the appropriate size that will fit into the niche, and clamp onto the head of the plug. Rotate COUNTER-CLOCKWISE. Lefty Loosey...
You should be able to break it free, and replace it with a new one from FoMoCo or an auto parts store. Do NOT get one that cuts its own threads. Some have slices cut into the 'tip' of the bolt, and they will cut new threads which you don't need, as the threads you currently have are holding tight even with all the twisting you did.
Get factory OEM or equivalent, with correct threads.
You could also try a twelve point socket, next size up, crammed onto the head with a hammer to break it loose. When you have it out, you can work the plug out of the socket. May be a six point would fit. Try english {inch} as you may find one of them is just the right size to fit over your mess. There IS enough to grab onto with a wrench, and any mech that charges an arm and a leg to remove the drain plug is taking advantage.
If you do take it to a shop, BRING your OWN replacement drain that you know is correct, as many will try to use what they have on hand. This plug stays with you for the life of the truck and you don't want to mess it up with stuff pulled out of someone's junk box...
tom
Tried all that.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-29-2012, 04:47 PM
Rifle Rifle is offline
Freshman User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 43
Rifle is starting off with a positive reputation.
Thanks for your Ideas but it’s a bit too late, apparently there is a socket that looks like screw turned inside out on the inside. Went to the auto mechanic he pick one of them up broke it free with no trouble; since I had a new oil plug, filter, and of course the oil to boot. That help cut down the cost, still had to pay $10 labor and my pride. Thanks for the tips, never got them in time, but tried them and they didn’t work anyway.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-29-2012, 05:40 PM
Rifle Rifle is offline
Freshman User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 43
Rifle is starting off with a positive reputation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fixnair View Post
Another trick is to smack it hard with a heavy hammer. This will often compress the gasket under the plug and cause the threads to loosen up. The trick is getting enough of a swing at it.
Ok, glad I didn't do that.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-03-2013, 10:59 PM
Stinky1 Stinky1 is offline
Junior User
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Whitewater, CO
Posts: 65
Stinky1 is starting off with a positive reputation.
I see that somebody saved the day. I bet that for you, that $10 was cheap.

For future reference, you can try putting vicegrips on it and then hitting it as you are putting pressure on it. IOW, put pressure on the VGs, like you are trying to loosen it and then wack it.

If that doesn't work, take a 1/2" nut, place it over the mangled bolt and weld it on there. It will come off. There is a more to this than what I just said (standard safety precautions apply), but I guar-an-darn-tee, that if you weld a nut on the bolt, that the bolt is coming out. Also, I would consider this a last resort....especially because you have an AL pan. I sorta doubt that you'd have fire issues as the oil would prevent oxygen getting to the heat...AND, you'd go slow.

I've done the above, to get busted studs out of steel and cast...they come right out. I had a crank bolt bust...no problemo
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 10:59 PM
 
 
 
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rear sway bar install on a F350 with 20” wheels! (Pictures) Big-Sarge 6.7L Power Stroke Diesel 159 11-19-2014 12:57 PM
New to the So~cal chapter 95bronco12 California, Southern Chapter 12 07-08-2013 03:36 AM
superduty axle's under 97 PSD jschmale04 1994.5 - 1997 7.3L Power Stroke Diesel 7 02-27-2013 10:29 AM
Well What’s the Damage? Rifle Ranger & B-Series 16 02-24-2013 04:41 PM
What is this part and port? rfdepew 1987 - 1996 F150 & Larger F-Series Trucks 3 07-11-2011 06:30 PM


Go Back   Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums > Performance, Engines & Troubleshooting > Other Ford Engines > 4 Cylinder Engines

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7 AC1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertising - Terms of Use - Privacy Statement - Jobs
This forum is owned and operated by Internet Brands, Inc., a Delaware corporation. It is not authorized or endorsed by the Ford Motor Company and is not affiliated with the Ford Motor Company or its related companies in any way. Ford® is a registered trademark of the Ford Motor Company.

vbulletin Admin Backup