Buying 2018 F250 Screw Diesel for travel trailer. Advice needed - Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums

Go Back  Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums > Super Duty/Heavy Duty > 2017+ Super Duty
Reload this Page >

Buying 2018 F250 Screw Diesel for travel trailer. Advice needed

Notices
2017+ Super Duty The 2017+ Ford F250, F350, F450 and F550 Super Duty Pickup and Chassis Cab

Buying 2018 F250 Screw Diesel for travel trailer. Advice needed

Reply

 
 
 
  #1  
Old 03-11-2018, 12:41 PM
davidpacificnw
davidpacificnw is offline
Senior User
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 379
davidpacificnw is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.
Buying 2018 F250 Screw Diesel for travel trailer. Advice needed

Hi all,

After an exhaustive search to find an F150 with the options we wanted and the necessary payload numbers, we've decided it doesn't exist and will be buying a new F250 diesel. Our travel trailer is on order and arrives in May so I have time but am negotiating with several dealers now.

The help I need is regarding towing a travel trailer. I've towed similar units with half tons before being educated about the payload paradox of towing trailers. In previous towing, the tongue height at level was always pretty close to the hit height and I used a WD hitch to level things out and move TW on to the front axle of my half ton and the back axles of the TT. With the F250 I'll need a hitch that allows me to drop the ball way down. Anyone else have experience here and what's your set up look like.

I'll be rolling a 2018 F250 Screw 4x4 diesel 160" WB. My TT is a KZ 281BH. It's 33' tip to toe with a ry weight of 6300. I'll load it to 7300 and have a TW or about 1000 pounds. So, do you use a WD hitch with this set up on a super duty? A WD hitch is an absolute necessity with a half ton. Also, what kind of ball set up do you use?

Pics of your set up would be awesome.

Thanks
 
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-11-2018, 12:50 PM
Tricon's Avatar
Tricon
Tricon is offline
Posting Guru
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: SoCal
Posts: 2,398
Tricon has a good reputation on FTE.Tricon has a good reputation on FTE.
Originally Posted by davidpacificnw View Post
Hi all,

After an exhaustive search to find an F150 with the options we wanted and the necessary payload numbers, we've decided it doesn't exist and will be buying a new F250 diesel. Our travel trailer is on order and arrives in May so I have time but am negotiating with several dealers now.

The help I need is regarding towing a travel trailer. I've towed similar units with half tons before being educated about the payload paradox of towing trailers. In previous towing, the tongue height at level was always pretty close to the hit height and I used a WD hitch to level things out and move TW on to the front axle of my half ton and the back axles of the TT. With the F250 I'll need a hitch that allows me to drop the ball way down. Anyone else have experience here and what's your set up look like.

I'll be rolling a 2018 F250 Screw 4x4 diesel 160" WB. My TT is a KZ 281BH. It's 33' tip to toe with a ry weight of 6300. I'll load it to 7300 and have a TW or about 1000 pounds. So, do you use a WD hitch with this set up on a super duty? A WD hitch is an absolute necessity with a half ton. Also, what kind of ball set up do you use?

Pics of your set up would be awesome.

Thanks
A WDH at that weight isn't completely necessary. Some will say use a wdh no matter what, but it's ultimately up to you.

It's the exact same hitch you've used before but it'll have a drop shank, nothing special about the setup. Andersen is popular around here.
 
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-11-2018, 01:38 PM
KMP44's Avatar
KMP44
KMP44 is offline
Junior User
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Central New York
Posts: 81
KMP44 is starting off with a positive reputation.
As Tricon said, per Ford's towing guide and the owner's manual, WDH is not required all the way to the max towing capacity. I pull a ~6,500 lb camper with mine. Towed the first few times without it, and all was good, especially coming from towing with an F-150. Threw it on there one day to see if there was any difference, and there was noticeable improvement in the ease of towing. It wasn't the weight distribution really, it was the sway control. I went from two hands on the wheel "just in case" to a relaxed one hand on the wheel kind of feel. Totally up to you, but I like the improvement of the sway control. If you have an Equalizer or one of the others where the sway control is built in, you would be using the WDH. You can also buy a standalone friction sway bar from Pro Series or Reese. Only downside to the friction sway control is you can't backup with it in place.

And not trying to de-rail your thread, but might be worth considering a 350 if you go with the diesel to get a higher payload rating. The capacity (at least by the sticker) is pretty skinny on a 250 diesel. For around $700 you could upsize and gain around 1,000 lbs on payload.
 
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-11-2018, 01:49 PM
davidpacificnw
davidpacificnw is offline
Senior User
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 379
davidpacificnw is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.
Originally Posted by KMP44 View Post
As Tricon said, per Ford's towing guide and the owner's manual, WDH is not required all the way to the max towing capacity. I pull a ~6,500 lb camper with mine. Towed the first few times without it, and all was good, especially coming from towing with an F-150. Threw it on there one day to see if there was any difference, and there was noticeable improvement in the ease of towing. It wasn't the weight distribution really, it was the sway control. I went from two hands on the wheel "just in case" to a relaxed one hand on the wheel kind of feel. Totally up to you, but I like the improvement of the sway control. If you have an Equalizer or one of the others where the sway control is built in, you would be using the WDH. You can also buy a standalone friction sway bar from Pro Series or Reese. Only downside to the friction sway control is you can't backup with it in place.

And not trying to de-rail your thread, but might be worth considering a 350 if you go with the diesel to get a higher payload rating. The capacity (at least by the sticker) is pretty skinny on a 250 diesel. For around $700 you could upsize and gain around 1,000 lbs on payload.
KMP44.

Great advice. Thanks. What hitch set up do you use. I checked the payload rating on the door sticker for the rig I am negotiating on and is we over 2200 payload. the may I could find on f150 Lariat with the options we wanted was 1609 as the HDPP is not available on a loaded F150 (stupid ford move but now you know why 250s are blowing out the door).

I'll look at the 350. This is going to be my daily driver as well, so I am trying to work within the weekend tow/week day commute paradox.

You have any pics of your TT behind you super duty.

Thanks
 
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-11-2018, 02:09 PM
ERAUGrad04
ERAUGrad04 is offline
Junior User
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 86
ERAUGrad04 is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.ERAUGrad04 is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.
100% agree about looking at a 350. When I started down this path a couple of months ago, I wasn't even thinking 350. However, by the time you outfit a 250 with the HD towing packages, a similarly equipped 350 is within ~$700.

I've only test driven each truck about 5-10mi each, and it was hard to notice an ride quality differences. I'm sure the 350 is a bit harder, however, there is so much subjectivity to ride quality.

On the 2017+ Super Dutys, Ford has done A LOT with regards to ride quality and interior comfort. Maybe the 250 vs 350 differences were more apparent on older SDs, however, the new ones have closed the gap quite a bit.

Good luck on the new truck and trailer purchase! Sounds like fun times ahead!!
 
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-11-2018, 02:26 PM
wrvond's Avatar
wrvond
wrvond is offline
Posting Guru
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 1,987
wrvond has a very good reputation on FTE.wrvond has a very good reputation on FTE.wrvond has a very good reputation on FTE.
For the money, I also recommend going with an F350.
I have been using a Reese dual cam WDH with built in two point sway control since 1989. Earlier this week I ordered a Blue Ox Sway Pro from eTrailer.
I strongly recommend a WDH - primarily because it shifts weight off the tongue to the axle(s) of the camper, resulting in a less bouncy ride for the camper. Your particular camper also has a lot of sail area, so having a four point anti sway system (the Blue Ox) should be considered a very good thing.
Also, with the Blue Ox, if you upgrade to an even heavier camper, all you need to change are the torsion bars. The Blue Ox SwayPro is a snap to set up and simple to use. The only exposed grease is what you put on the ball.
 
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-11-2018, 03:29 PM
F350Dreamer
F350Dreamer is offline
New User
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 15
F350Dreamer is starting off with a positive reputation.
Just adding another recommendation to look at the 350. 250 Diesel will likely be an increase in payload over the 150, but how little the difference is may shock you. 250 Diesel may have sufficient payload for the trailer you're looking at now (be sure to include people and things in your truck bed in addition to tongue weight and hitch against your payload), but a 350 will give you a lot of headroom if your trailer appetite grows or you find yourself filling up your truck with 4 people and bed with firewood or other supplies to take camping with you. Diesel engines are heavy and the 250's limiting GVWR to 10K pounds doesn't leave a lot of payload left. 350 increases GVWR significantly, giving you a lot more payload rating.

To add a few numbers from the 2017 supplemental order guide (haven't looked for the 2018):

F250 Screw 4x4 diesel 160" WB: May payload for 2017 is 2,660 pounds, and that will be for a stripped XL. You'll get down in the low 2K range quickly with a well-equipped XLT or higher.
F350 Screw 4x4 diesel 160" WB: May payload for 2017 is 3,680 pounds with 17" tires or 3,930 with 18" tires. Again, higher trim models will bring that down...but you're starting with 1K more payload minimum over the F-250.

Buy the truck that works for you....just consider these figures in your calculation of what fits your needs.

Edit: found the 2018 guide and payload figures were within 10 pounds of 2017...no material differences.
 

Last edited by F350Dreamer; 03-11-2018 at 03:53 PM. Reason: add details
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-11-2018, 04:00 PM
psdxohio
psdxohio is offline
Senior User
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 266
psdxohio is starting off with a positive reputation.
Originally Posted by wrvond View Post
Also, with the Blue Ox, if you upgrade to an even heavier camper, all you need to change are the torsion bars. The Blue Ox SwayPro is a snap to set up and simple to use. The only exposed grease is what you put on the ball.
Can I use my existing Swaypro head and move it to the 2000 lb shank that goes in the 2-1/2” hitch?
 
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-11-2018, 04:47 PM
wrvond's Avatar
wrvond
wrvond is offline
Posting Guru
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 1,987
wrvond has a very good reputation on FTE.wrvond has a very good reputation on FTE.wrvond has a very good reputation on FTE.
Originally Posted by psdxohio View Post


Can I use my existing Swaypro head and move it to the 2000 lb shank that goes in the 2-1/2” hitch?
Only if your existing head is a BXW2000. All other heads use the 2" shank.
 
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-11-2018, 05:04 PM
Tall Timbers's Avatar
Tall Timbers
Tall Timbers is offline
Freshman User
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Fairbanks Alaska
Posts: 39
Tall Timbers is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.
I don't have a trailer (other than a flatbed I haven't been using) at the moment, but I suggest always using a weight distribution mount with your trailer, and with the sway bar if you're going far. Since I've had lots of things I've pulled over the years I've got a mess of trailer ball mounts that both raise and drop the ball. The WD mounts I have (have two of 'em) can be raised or lowered as needed for the vehicle/trailer match.
 
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 03-11-2018, 05:28 PM
TrippinStfflr
TrippinStfflr is offline
Junior User
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: On the road
Posts: 74
TrippinStfflr is starting off with a positive reputation.
I tow almost the exact same set up every day. I use a Huskey Centerline WDH only because I had it on my Tundra. I've towed many times without installing it. Is it better with it installed? Absolutely. Do you really need it? No. My main concern is more related to my trailer tongue jack. In order to install it. You have to lift the *** end of your truck up (weight of the truck, payload, tongue weight of trailer). I dont know for sure how much it is, I havent put it on a scale and it varies depending on my truck payload, but my tongue jack sure sounds like its straining. I've lowered the tension on my WDH so I dont have to lift it so high. All in all, I'm gonna keep using my WDH. It absolutely helps with sway and levels the truck out and I bought it so I'm gonna use it.
 
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-11-2018, 05:43 PM
Sunnyside42
Sunnyside42 is offline
Senior User
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 177
Sunnyside42 is starting off with a positive reputation.
Welcome to the slippery slope of the F250 / F350 decision point.

I was in almost your exact shoes, except we don't have the TT yet. We started down the "let's load out a 150" path, looking to tow about 10K pounds. This quickly turned into a "yeah okay, this is really a 250 discussion". Then add in the "looking at the differences between the 250/350 and the possibility of a 5th wheel" and boom we ended up in 350 land.

I put the order in last week...
 
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-11-2018, 07:03 PM
Jlepper
Jlepper is offline
Freshman User
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 29
Jlepper is starting off with a positive reputation.
If you’re in the Pacific NW as your signature suggests you’ll be pulling mountain passes. An F150 no matter how loaded up for towing is going struggle. Been there, towed a 7000 lb trailer with a F150 before moving to F350 6.7 eight months ago. The difference is stunning, no more “tail wagging the dog”. Have to check the mirrors to make sure the trailer is still there. Mileage is 12% better with identical setup and the drive is much more relaxed. Unlike most other areas diesel runs about 10% less than regular gas in British Columbia (yes brutally expensive). 350’s are actually cheaper here as they are exempt from a 3% luxury tax for vehicles over 55K. Yes, I still use a WDH with the new truck. You’re going to be glad you didn’t go the 150 route.
 
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-11-2018, 07:32 PM
mrgrayaz
mrgrayaz is offline
Senior User
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 323
mrgrayaz is starting off with a positive reputation.
Yep F-350 for when you eventually outgrow the TT and want a 5th...
 
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-11-2018, 08:27 PM
AdaminGA
AdaminGA is offline
New User
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 6
AdaminGA is starting off with a positive reputation.
In a similar boat...looking to get a 250 for a TT of 7200 lbs. What’s the payload difference in a 250 with max trailer package and a 350?
 
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Buying 2018 F250 Screw Diesel for travel trailer. Advice needed


Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.