Exhaust Manifold Studs Broken Causing Leak, PO Drilled Off-Center - Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums



Exhaust Manifold Studs Broken Causing Leak, PO Drilled Off-Center

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Old 08-23-2012, 02:52 PM
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Exhaust Manifold Studs Broken Causing Leak, PO Drilled Off-Center

Hey All,

I believe I am in the right place.

I have searched and read about the common Broken Exhaust Manifold Stud issue.

Since I purchased this 1993 E350 7.5L, I have had an Exhaust Leak.
I finally pulled the Engine Cover to discover that the 2 Bolts on the Driver Side, closes to the Rear of the Van, were gone.

I looked into the holes and saw that the Bolts were broken off, and only Studs remain.

I also noticed that someone had tried to perhaps drill out one of the Studs and went completely off-center, and looks like they marred the Threads on the Head.

So, I think all the ways to remove the Studs that I have been reading about, won't work for me.
Except maybe using a portable Electrical Discharge Machine.

I would like to see if anyone can give some tips on how I can cheaply get this Stud out, without removing the Manifold.

I have thought about fabricating some 'guide rods' from some round-stock that will fit into the Manifold hole, then drilling a hole in the exact center of the metal rod as a guide for a drill bit.
And maybe making 2 or 3 'rod guides' with different sized 'guide holes' to drill out the entire Stud.

Thoughts?

Thanks.
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Old 08-23-2012, 07:33 PM
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Okay, so I had some 'guide rods' made.

Now my problem is clearance.

I have a right angle air-drill, but not enough space for everything.

I don't want to cut the sheet metal near the foot pedals.

Any tips?

Thanks.
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Old 08-24-2012, 04:02 PM
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The lack of responses should speak volumes. It's incredibly difficult to accurately drill out the center of the stud in the best-case scenario in-situ (in-place). I just witnessed this process go bad a few weeks ago in a shop, and the shop had to buy and install a used head for the customer (no profit on that job, no cookie for you).

My advice is to pull the motor, as difficult as that is. I had a Cadillac 472 with a leaky exhaust manifold that would have required engine removal in order to correctly fix it - I used two stainless screw-type hose clamps and some asbestos rope to seal the leak. About once a year I would have to loosen the clamps and repack the asbestos into the gap and then tighten it down again. Did that for ten years until I sold the vehicle!
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Old 08-24-2012, 04:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redmondjp View Post
The lack of responses should speak volumes. It's incredibly difficult to accurately drill out the center of the stud in the best-case scenario in-situ (in-place). I just witnessed this process go bad a few weeks ago in a shop, and the shop had to buy and install a used head for the customer (no profit on that job, no cookie for you).

My advice is to pull the motor, as difficult as that is. I had a Cadillac 472 with a leaky exhaust manifold that would have required engine removal in order to correctly fix it - I used two stainless screw-type hose clamps and some asbestos rope to seal the leak. About once a year I would have to loosen the clamps and repack the asbestos into the gap and then tighten it down again. Did that for ten years until I sold the vehicle!
Yeah, I only need to buy time to do it correctly.

My registration is due in a week, so I have to pass Smog.

Maybe if there is a way I can seal up the port for now.

Not sure I fully understand how you did it with the Hose Clamps and Rope.

Thanks for the Reply.
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Old 08-24-2012, 05:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Wagon View Post
Yeah, I only need to buy time to do it correctly.

My registration is due in a week, so I have to pass Smog.

Maybe if there is a way I can seal up the port for now.

Not sure I fully understand how you did it with the Hose Clamps and Rope.

Thanks for the Reply.
The leak on mine was in the gap between the manifold and the head. There was sufficient space around each exhaust port on the head, and in the design of the exhaust manifold itself, that I was able to completely wrap around the leaky port with a stainless screw-type hose clamp (actually I used two short ones connected to each other). I had to make a couple of bends in the clamp strap in order to get the clamp flush to the surface in the area of the leak. Then I used the asbestos material over the leak and tightened down the clamps.

You may be able to use a sheet-type of exhaust manifold gasket material and cut a piece and wedge it into the leaking slot, then using the clamps to hold in place. Handy-wire or rebar tie wire (aka "bailing wire") could also be used instead of the stainless hose clamps.

I freely admit that this is a bandaid fix at best; I did it because I was in college at the time and didn't have the time, resources, or place to repair my vehicle properly so I did the best that I could with what I had. I just threw this out there as a possibility that may work.
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Old 08-25-2012, 02:20 PM
big vann big vann is offline
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You'll have to remove the manifold to get it out.Weld a nut on the broken stud and work it out.Spray some PB Blaster on the area as well.I just did this on a Windsor engine and it (the broken bolt) came right out.
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Old 08-25-2012, 04:52 PM
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Yes remove the manifold off of the head, will give you room to work. Your other fasteners should come out easy. Just use 6 point socket. Removing the stud shouldn't be so hard that a way. Pull the head last, you may have to go with another head, worst case. Use the locking screw kit.
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Old 09-10-2012, 01:05 PM
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Since passing smog was my goal, I decided to try and have it tested before I pull the Manifold off to see if it would pass first.

It past.

So, now I can take my time.

It is extremely tight around the Manifold on these Vans.

Having a hard time getting tools in there.

Got a long extension and managed to break another stud.

Even after I get all the studs off / broken off, I will have a hard time getting in there to work the broken studs out.

And then re-installing the Manifold and new bolts will be difficult as well.

I need more space!
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Old 09-10-2012, 03:12 PM
big vann big vann is offline
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I just sold my '83 E150 4x4 van because it was a PITA to work on.It only had a 351w.I swapped the Edelbrock heads for some cast iron home ported stockers and they were very difficult to install on the engine due to the doghouse.I can't imagine doing that on a 460 in the same location as the Windsor.That 460 must be a real tight fit.You might be better off just swapping heads as they're cheap and relatively common.Just remember there is a difference between carbed heads and EFI heads.You cannot interchange them.
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Old 09-10-2012, 07:19 PM
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Be sure & go buy STAINLESS STEEL Studs & bolts when you go back together, & use anti seize in the threads.
When I owned my 460 I replaced mine with stainless & never had another issue. In fact I don't care what engine, IE make, model, size stainless steel bolts & studs will save you a lot of headaches later.
Craig
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Old 09-12-2012, 11:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big vann View Post
I just sold my '83 E150 4x4 van because it was a PITA to work on.It only had a 351w.I swapped the Edelbrock heads for some cast iron home ported stockers and they were very difficult to install on the engine due to the doghouse.I can't imagine doing that on a 460 in the same location as the Windsor.That 460 must be a real tight fit.You might be better off just swapping heads as they're cheap and relatively common.Just remember there is a difference between carbed heads and EFI heads.You cannot interchange them.
Thanks for the tip.
Its an EFI.
I definitely have a tight fit to say the least.
When I replaced the Spark Plugs, they were very oily.
This engine probably could stand to be removed any way and given a once over.
Then Ill have all the space I need.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kermmydog View Post
Be sure & go buy STAINLESS STEEL Studs & bolts when you go back together, & use anti seize in the threads.
When I owned my 460 I replaced mine with stainless & never had another issue. In fact I don't care what engine, IE make, model, size stainless steel bolts & studs will save you a lot of headaches later.
Craig
Agreed.
Thanks.
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Old 02-15-2013, 01:58 AM
Gtbread Gtbread is offline
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This is the problem I am looking at on my 2001 v10 I need other exhaust work too wondering about some different headers all together for better gas milage
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Old 02-16-2013, 08:56 AM
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With oil on any number of spark plugs U are wasting your time doing anything to it except removal. After removal, knowing the compression of each cylinder U can make a value decision. Simple trade in would be good at this time of the year.

GTbread U are at the time to decide also. Rebuild or trade for new. UR looking at a lot of personnel time and cash to REBO and a lot rides on just how sound is theold girl?
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Old 02-27-2013, 05:16 PM
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So if I'm pondering headers on my 1990 E350 motorhome.....

what if the studs were soaked daily for a week with PB blaster, or JB80, or Kroil....will any of the studs break?

Keep in mind the above products get into the "millionth of an inch" space, and given time (I have plenty of it) should work, right?
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Old 03-10-2013, 01:08 AM
dtupper1 dtupper1 is offline
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Can't say if the studs will break or not, but here is how it went for me today on an 85 f250 w/ 460. I sprayed/soaked the studs in penetrant about 5 times over the course of about 12 days. They came out easy and intact today, it was an awesome feeling. Lots of smoke from burning penetrant when I moved it before starting the work though : )
Incidentally I was freaking out and extra careful because I also have a e350 motor home with 460 and a few years ago I spoke to a guy at Banks Engineering and he said "they will almost always break or be broken". Might have gotten lucky.
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