REVIEW: Ford Tough Celebrates America’s Favorite Ride

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Ford Trucks

Auto historian Patrick Foster covers a century of Blue Oval’s best with fascinating facts and photos in new tome from Motorbooks.

If you’re like us, you simply can’t get enough when it comes to Ford trucks. And despite the fact that many folks like to think they know it all when it comes to the Blue Oval, 100 years covers an awful lot of ground. So, to celebrate the centennial of America’s most iconic vehicle, automotive writer and historian Patrick Foster has put together an amazing book covering the entire story: Ford Tough: 100 Years of Ford Trucks.

The story, of course, starts way back in 1917. It was then that Ford introduced to the world its very first one-ton commercial truck chassis. Little did anyone know then that the simple shift from commercial cars and delivery vans to trucks would prove to be such a harbinger of history.

And even before Ford sold them, dealers were offering small, aftermarket truck beds for the Model T passenger car. America clearly wanted trucks, and only eight years after the debut of the Model TT, Ford answered that call with its first factory-built pickup. The rest, as they say, is history. And foster covers it all in his outstanding book.

The 208-page hardback tome from Motorbooks is chock-full of fascinating facts surrounding Ford’s truck journey. And of course, Ford Tough: 100 Years of Ford Trucks features over 300 stellar photos of everything from the Model T to everyone’s favorite Ford truck, the Raptor. The comprehensive tome leaves no stone unturned and features everything from mega-popular F-150s to rare rides, including the Model A roadster pickup and the 81C.

So, whether or not you claim to know everything about Ford trucks, there’s certainly plenty to learn in the pages of Ford Tough: 100 Years of Ford Trucks. You can find a copy of Ford Tough, which hit bookshelves earlier this month, here.

Check out some of Ford Tough‘s fun facts and photos, below, and brush up on your Ford truck knowledge!

Ford Trucks

Recession-busting Badass: In 2009, the U.S. economy was just beginning to bounce back from a low point. Trucks like this sharp-looking F-150 were one reason why shoppers were returning to showrooms.

Ford Trucks

Ford Ranger Rides Again: The Ranger returned in 1987 with minor improvements and few appearance changes. The full line was advertised as “an investment in value” because they offered more standard features than the competition.

Ford Trucks

War Hero: The day after the ruthless bombing of Pearl Harbor, America declared war. As the nation began building up its might, Ford was asked to produce heavy-duty cargo trucks for the military.

Ford Trucks

One Cool Ride: The 1931 Model A is an ultra-rare Type 66-A Deluxe Pickup. Only 293 were produced, with most going to General Electric as part of a refrigerator promotion.

Ford Trucks

America’s Then Top Model: In July 1930, Ford began offering a line of factory-supplied dump trucks. This 1930 Model AA had dual rear wheels for extra carrying capacity and strength. The 1.5-cubic-yard model was the least expensive dump truck in the lineup.

Ford Trucks

Transformer: One of the more popular “trucks” of 1919 wasn’t really even a truck. The converted Model T roadster sported a short bed, steel doors and a soft top. Although they couldn’t haul much, they were inexpensive and popular with farmers and small business owners.

Ford Trucks

Warrior on Wheels: In 1917, Ford continued to produce the Model T car. It also offered chassis that were converted to truck-type vehicles. One that was vitally needed, due to WWI, was this ambulance model. More than 5,700 of them were produced for the war effort.

Ford Trucks

Radical Roadster: This 1915 Model T is yet another roadster fitted with a slip-on pickup body. Made of steel construction with sturdy flare boards and a double-panel tailgate, it had a high-quality body.

Brett Foote is a longtime contributor to Internet Brands’ Auto sites, including Chevrolet Forum, Rennlist, and Ford Truck Enthusiasts, among other sites.

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