Ccv Mod - Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums



1999 - 2003 7.3L Power Stroke Diesel  
Sponsored by:
Sponsored by:

Ccv Mod

Reply
 
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 09-18-2004, 10:42 PM
freddyfast9 freddyfast9 is offline
Senior User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Romulus, Michigan
Posts: 131
freddyfast9 is starting off with a positive reputation.
Ccv Mod

I have been hearing a lot about this and have done a lot of things to my truck so far I even went so far as running a scoop in the wheel well to gather extra air for my baby to breath I guess my question is what should I expect to gain from this mod and if it is worth it I really like the kit on ebay looks sharp.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-18-2004, 10:56 PM
psdpower's Avatar
psdpower psdpower is offline
Elder User
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Forest Hill, MD
Posts: 637
psdpower is starting off with a positive reputation.
If you leave the stock CCV tube in the intake hose the only thing you can expect is cleaner intercooler tubes. Removing the CCV tube from the intake hose and replacing it with 4 inch tubing is supposed to be good for a 20% reduction in intake restriction. The kit on EBAY is nice but if you don't need the powdercoat you can do the mod yourself much cheaper.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-18-2004, 11:06 PM
SpringerPop's Avatar
SpringerPop SpringerPop is offline
Too old to be too smart
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: La La Land
Posts: 17,219
SpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputation
I did this mod two days ago. I ran the 3/4 inch hose all the way to the rear bumper. Takes 22 feet of hose to do it this way. You also should get a piece of 4 inch diameter exhaust pipe that is 3-1/2 inches long. This piece replaces the plastic piece of turbo intake air ducting where the crankcase is originally vented to. Get an in-line plastic 3/4 inch heater hose "splice" from your parts house. Shove it into the factory 90 degree hose, and shove the heater hose onto the other end. Use heater hose clamps on everything. You'll need three total, because you should cut off the factory "crimp" types from the small 90 degree bend. Run the heater hose up over the master cylinder. Starting the run of hose in an upward direction will allow most of any liquid oil that may have accumulated to drain back into the valve cover when the engine is shut off. Then run the rest of the heater hose to the outside of the frame to avoid the exhaust system, and then decide where you want the other end to terminate. Others have run it off to different places.

The advantages to doing this mod are: 1) To eliminate engine oil from getting sucked through the turbo and collecting in the intercooler, and 2) you end opening up the turbo intake ducting by at least 20 percent by replacing the plastic duct with the exhaust pipe piece.

YMMV
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-18-2004, 11:39 PM
wlihntr's Avatar
wlihntr wlihntr is offline
Postmaster
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: colorado
Posts: 4,758
wlihntr has a good reputation on FTE.wlihntr has a good reputation on FTE.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringerDad
I did this mod two days ago. I ran the 3/4 inch hose all the way to the rear bumper. Takes 22 feet of hose to do it this way. You also should get a piece of 4 inch diameter exhaust pipe that is 3-1/2 inches long. This piece replaces the plastic piece of turbo intake air ducting where the crankcase is originally vented to. Get an in-line plastic 3/4 inch heater hose "splice" from your parts house. Shove it into the factory 90 degree hose, and shove the heater hose onto the other end. Use heater hose clamps on everything. You'll need three total, because you should cut off the factory "crimp" types from the small 90 degree bend. Run the heater hose up over the master cylinder. Starting the run of hose in an upward direction will allow most of any liquid oil that may have accumulated to drain back into the valve cover when the engine is shut off. Then run the rest of the heater hose to the outside of the frame to avoid the exhaust system, and then decide where you want the other end to terminate. Others have run it off to different places.

The advantages to doing this mod are: 1) To eliminate engine oil from getting sucked through the turbo and collecting in the intercooler, and 2) you end opening up the turbo intake ducting by at least 20 percent by replacing the plastic duct with the exhaust pipe piece.

YMMV
excellent explanation
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-18-2004, 11:59 PM
SpringerPop's Avatar
SpringerPop SpringerPop is offline
Too old to be too smart
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: La La Land
Posts: 17,219
SpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputation
I forgot to mention that the two Phillips-head screws that hole the breather assembly to the rest of the valve cover should be removed to allow you to turn the breather housing 180 degrees to put the outlet hose toward the rear of the engine instead of facing forward as it is stock. Be sure that the two O-rings between the housing and the valve cover are seated correctly, too, when you reassemble it. Check them for cracks and tears. They are 1-1/8 inch i.d. rings, and I needed to replace mine. Cheap, at your parts house or even Home Depot. Also, there are small 1/4 inch i.d. rings on the two Phillips-head screws. Insure they are good, too, or you'll have a small, constant oil leak problem. Also available at your friendly o-ring supplier.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-19-2004, 09:35 AM
freddyfast9 freddyfast9 is offline
Senior User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Romulus, Michigan
Posts: 131
freddyfast9 is starting off with a positive reputation.
ah I see so more air to the engine was the selling point on that I can use all the air I can get with these ts injectors thanks guys.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-19-2004, 12:59 PM
SpringerPop's Avatar
SpringerPop SpringerPop is offline
Too old to be too smart
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: La La Land
Posts: 17,219
SpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputation
You might be surprised to see how much oily grit has collected on that plastic duct piece, too! It might be very "telling" of the condition of past air filters and their correct fit into the air box.

SpringerPop
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-19-2004, 04:19 PM
01stroker's Avatar
01stroker 01stroker is offline
Senior User
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 248
01stroker is starting off with a positive reputation.
The main selling point for me to do it was keeping that oil out of my intercooler therfore keeping my boots cleaner! Too much oil collecting in the intercooler can possibly lead to a runaway condition. I don't know if this has happened very many times but I don't want to take a chance.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-19-2004, 11:20 PM
444dieselrod's Avatar
444dieselrod 444dieselrod is offline
Posting Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Barnesville MN
Posts: 2,415
444dieselrod is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.444dieselrod is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.
Good Point HeatStroked.

I never really thought of the possibility of a runnaway condition acurring, but I do wonder if it has ever happened.

hey Freddy, expect a little bit a smoke/steam from the hose after you do the mod, I was suprised at the amount of steam that it gives off once it is warm and idling.

Diesel rod
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-20-2004, 02:41 PM
Kevin24 Kevin24 is offline
Junior User
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 72
Kevin24 is starting off with a positive reputation.
Can somebody post some pic's of this mod please ..

Thanks
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 09-20-2004, 03:25 PM
wlihntr's Avatar
wlihntr wlihntr is offline
Postmaster
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: colorado
Posts: 4,758
wlihntr has a good reputation on FTE.wlihntr has a good reputation on FTE.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin24
Can somebody post some pic's of this mod please ..

Thanks
look in my gallery, i have a few pics of it in there
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 09-20-2004, 04:40 PM
freddyfast9 freddyfast9 is offline
Senior User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Romulus, Michigan
Posts: 131
freddyfast9 is starting off with a positive reputation.
Unhappy

Thank you guys very well put,I do love it so when someone explains things the way you guys did very detailed I am doing this one next weekend and I won't be alarmed by the steam and smoke coming out thanks for the heads up.OH by the way I removed my chip to show a neighbor the difference it made and noticed blue smoke coming out when I rev up and even at idle an extra amount of smoke coming out my injectors are designed to come on at higher boost and full throttle so anyone have any idea about the blue bad smelling smoke it has never done this
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 09-20-2004, 07:35 PM
Turbo_Whistler's Avatar
Turbo_Whistler Turbo_Whistler is offline
Senior User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Lewiston, Idaho
Posts: 297
Turbo_Whistler is starting off with a positive reputation.
Does the crank case vent only allow air or contents to come out?, i drive in dusty conditions a lot and wouldn't want any dust or dirt particles going into my motor through valve cover if i did this mod?
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 09-20-2004, 08:06 PM
SpringerPop's Avatar
SpringerPop SpringerPop is offline
Too old to be too smart
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: La La Land
Posts: 17,219
SpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputationSpringerPop has a superb reputation
Whistler,

The purpose of this mod is to vent the crankcase blowby gasses directly into the atmosphere. While the engine is running, there is a small amount of cylinder gasses that escape past the piston rings into the crankcase. Since what is "blown-by" starts out a very high (combustion chamber) pressure, the blowby creates a pressure in the crankcase that is always higher than atmospheric pressure when the engine is running. Nothing will get back into your crankcase provided that you have a sufficiently long hose attached. I used 22 feet, but others have used much less and vented the end of the hose to different locations. There is also a filter assembly (very expensive) that could be added to the end of the hose, but I thought it unnecessary.

What you end up with is a crankcase ventilation system that was used on both diesel and gasoline engines until the advent of PCV valves, which came into popular use during the early '60s.

There is one other, minor, consideration involved here. PCV valves were originally used to slightly vacuum the crankcase, leaving them at a pressure slightly less than atmospheric. The purpose was to cut down on oil leakage past seals and gaskets. If that actually worked, we might all see a slight increase in the chances for engine oil leaks to develop.

Me? I'll take that risk.

SpringerPop
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 09-21-2004, 01:33 AM
Kwikkordead's Avatar
Kwikkordead Kwikkordead is offline
Post Fiend
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: North Seattle, WA.
Posts: 22,282
Kwikkordead has a superb reputationKwikkordead has a superb reputationKwikkordead has a superb reputationKwikkordead has a superb reputationKwikkordead has a superb reputationKwikkordead has a superb reputationKwikkordead has a superb reputationKwikkordead has a superb reputationKwikkordead has a superb reputationKwikkordead has a superb reputationKwikkordead has a superb reputation
On gas engines you don't want to disable the PCV systems that are in place. You'll end up with a real gunky crankcase. The diesel is different it doesn't accumulate that sludge like a gasser will. Don't believe me? Go look in a filler neck on a pre-67 any brand of car and you will find a lot of sludgy buildup on the filler neck and valve covers. The PCV valve vacuums out the gasses that make that sludge.
Don't be afraid of the CCV mod on the diesel it won't sludge up like the gasser.
Reply With Quote
 
 
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need some info for bulitproofing my 04 6.0 DpLandScaping 6.0L Power Stroke Diesel 7 08-15-2017 09:36 AM
ZF 5 Short Throw Mod?? F-250 restorer 1987 - 1996 F150 & Larger F-Series Trucks 5 03-18-2017 09:59 AM
New 350 owner Bellzbub 2017+ Super Duty 4 02-01-2017 04:15 AM
bumpside body mods and pictures davidmoss1992 1967 - 1972 F-100 & Larger F-Series Trucks 31 10-07-2012 11:38 PM
Help - "Pedal Mod" "Power Pedal" "Hot Foot" Spool&Go 1999 - 2003 7.3L Power Stroke Diesel 27 07-22-2010 11:12 PM


Go Back   Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums >

Tags
2001, 2006, 60, 73l, ccv, crankcase, diesel, ebay, ford, mod, onpowerstroke, pics, powerstroke, tdi, vent, vw

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:36 AM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.