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1966 Windshield Installation complete

 
  #1  
Old 08-09-2010, 12:46 PM
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1966 Windshield Installation complete

Got the windshield installed the other day on my '66 Custom Cab...
I had read a few threads on the forum and followed instructions based
on original Ford maintenance docs on FTE and it went as smooth as could be. I lucked out and found a wreck here in San Diego with a perfect NOS
windshield, with perfect trim...nice to have a spair.

I was a little nervous about it, as quite a few guys had said it was a bear
and took a long time??...It went so easy, I was a little confused. The hardest thing was looking at the new seal and getting the right parts into the right slots...Custom cabs have the Chrome trim, and everyone said they are so easy to destroy (I agree!). The secret, which I think should be obvious, as the Chrome trim is so hard to find, is to simply buy the new $40 window seal and then gently cut out the old window from the inside and pop it out, then remove the chrome by cutting/extracting it gently from the old rubber. By doing it like this, it was a piece of cake. The string method in the final mounting of the seal onto the truck (done from inside) needs to be done very carefully to prevent any tearing of the seal...slow and easy.

The other trick is as the seal and chrome go on, tape it into place until the trim is completely in. Siliconed the seal after, and voila!

Thanks to FTE for the info.
Best,
Jason
 

Last edited by CropDusterMan; 08-09-2010 at 11:31 PM. Reason: small omition
  #2  
Old 08-09-2010, 07:22 PM
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Your install is right on, the gasket is supposed to be installed without sealant.





John
 
  #3  
Old 05-06-2012, 06:42 PM
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Question New windshield

I am going to be removing and installing a windshield in my 66 F100 Custom Cab...I got what you are saying about the removal, but don't understand the sting trick for the install, can you please go in to detail on that, also...am I NOT suppose to use that black sealant on the new seal? And last but not least can this be a one man job?...Thanks
 
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Old 05-06-2012, 09:01 PM
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The gaskets used on Slicks are dry fit. The good rubber is made at Dennis Carpenter & sold through his network of dealers.

This is a 2 person job, using 3/16 or 1/4 in sash cord. Start center bottom go totally around back to center bottom. Set the unit in place and start pulling the cord to pull the rubber inside the metal lip while #2 is on the outside pushing in.

If you have metal trim, it goes in while it's still on the bench.

If you have more questions ask away.




John
 
  #5  
Old 05-06-2012, 10:03 PM
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I have done this before, but I have reached the age where I have erased from my brain all the irrelevancies of life, and Fords. However, I erased something I now can't retrieve, beyond a faint memory:
Either: the stainless goes in first or you will have a very difficult time; or, the stainless goes in after or you will have a very difficult time. Which is it? ( If John knows it's only because he wrote it down somewhere!)
Eric
 
  #6  
Old 05-06-2012, 10:14 PM
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I found it to be a royal pita with the custom cab stainless IMHO
 
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Old 05-06-2012, 10:43 PM
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Yeah, I have a feeling that this will be interesting. The seal that is in it now has 1" gaps every 2 feet...not sure what was going on there...
 
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Old 05-07-2012, 05:51 AM
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6t6, Don't know what you were fretting about, I thought it was a piece o cake.

I bought new Dennis Carpenter rubber, took it to the local glass shop where I bought new glass from. They laid out 2 work benches, placed the glass on it, put the rubber on, put the trim in, wrapped the sash cord around, then put it in.

Absolutely no issues at all.





John
 
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Old 05-07-2012, 06:51 AM
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that's what I like to hear!
 
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Old 05-07-2012, 08:40 AM
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Yes indeed!
Eric
 
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Old 05-07-2012, 09:53 AM
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ya that's the trick get some other sucker to do it n
 
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Old 05-07-2012, 11:46 AM
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Unfortunately it will be myself and a friend taking on this task...
 
  #13  
Old 12-23-2018, 12:37 PM
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Thumbs up Windshield Installation Success!

Hi Everyone
First off, just want to say thanks for all the great advice here. I've been lurking for some time, and this is my first time posting. I figured a solid success warranted that!

I replaced the windshield of my '66 F250 CCab the other day and it was a piece of cake. Took about an hour from start to finish with a second set of hands helping. There were no issues at all, this truly was a snap. Thankfully, too - I had been expecting the worst.

We used a combination of the advice gleaned here, a good YouTube video, and info from the shop manual. I ended up taking what I thought were the best parts of each. There are links for everything at the end of this post.

I sure wish I had taken pictures and video along the way to share. Live and learn - I'll do more of that with my next project here.

Here are the steps I followed:
1) I removed the old window, preserving the stainless trim. I marked (using a sharpie) the orientation and alignment of the clips before I removed the trim. Make sure you also put a few marks on the old glass which you can transfer to the new glass to aid in aligning the trim.
In my case the old rubber was in such bad shape that I had to chisel it out, being careful not to ding the window flange.

2) Clean up the flange. In my case, there were some pretty serious sharp burrs (from the original manufacture) around that flange. To avoid tearing the rubber [read: to give myself the best odds of success] I removed or softened these burrs, and then primed and painted the metal before proceeding. I used a high-build epoxy primer to help smooth out the opening and give the rubber an easy seat.

3) We laid out and marked the new glass and the truck cab. Using some sawhorses, a long ruler, and a cloth tailor's tape I marked a horizontal and vertical centerline on the outside surface of the new glass using a Sharpie. I did this to help align the rubber seam (which goes at the bottom, incidentally), and also to help align the trim. I also put some blue tape at four cardinal points on the outside of the cab, just outside where the rubber would land. I measured and marked a corresponding center horizontally and vertically. Note that the goal here isn't dead accuracy, but rather to give yourself a target as you put the window in.

4) Next, we put the rubber on the glass. While I was doing the measuring, the new rubber (from the Dennis Carpenter Cab-Kit CAB61-B) was warming in the sun. With the inside facing up, we worked the rubber onto the window. This is really a two person job, just because it's unwieldy. I used a lot 2" 3M blue painter's tape to hold the rubber in place as we worked, looping it from one side of the glass around to the other. Once the rubber was on we let it set for 5-10 minutes to give the rubber time to acclimate and conform. I did not use any sealant between the glass and the rubber. If a leak develops I plan to use a flowable silicone at this joint.

5) Next, we installed the stainless trim. I found that I could undo sections of the blue tape and fold the entire outer flange of the weatherstrip up, exposing the groove for the stainless trim. The trim has a J-hook shape that fits into this groove. We put some rubber lubricant into the J-groove, and carefully worked the trim pieces into place. Those marks I made on the trim came in real handy. After the trim was in place, we folded back the rubber and re-taped it. We did this entire step with the inside of the glass still facing up.

[Note that the order of the above two steps differs a bit from the 1966 Ford Truck Shop Manual (page 17-27) - that calls for the trim to go into the rubber before it's on the glass. I think this was a mistake by the technical writer who authored the instructions in the manual. I really can't imagine doing it that way.]

6) We strung a rope in the rubber and taped it to the inside of the glass, using exactly the same procedure in the video. This took a bit of lubricant as well. In this step, as well as the one before, I used Purple Power rubber lubricant. The shop manual mentions RuGlyde, but Purple Power had better reviews on Amazon, so I went with it. The gasket rope insert tool was a major help.

7) I opted for a non-hardening sealer between the rubber and the cab. There are conflicting thoughts on this - I decided to do it for two reasons: a) This was my first time performing this repair and I don't want to have to repeat it, and b) the Ford shop manual recommends it. I used 3M Bedding and Glazing Compound. We put about a 1/4" bead all around the outer rubber flange.

8) We used a couple suction handles on each side of the glass. I bought mine at Harbor Freight, although the link below is from Amazon. Having handles on both sides really helped - I could position and tension the glass from inside the cab as I roped, while my helper had control from the outside as well.

9) After lifting the glass in place, we roped it in just like in the video below, working from center bottom. We took the blue tape off the bottom and sides first, leaving it on the top until we had the lower flange pulled over. I put some rubber lubricant in a small jar and used a chip brush to paint it on the rubber as I roped, to help avoid tearing. This turned out to be the trick to getting it in quickly and smoothly. Once the whole thing was in, we used the handles to help nudge the glass around a bit to help seat the fit.

Hope this helps someone as much as the rest of this thread helped me!

Great YouTube video on this installation:
Purple Power (3920P) Tire and Rubber Lubricant: http://a.co/d/gvNlSsK
Gasket Rope Insert Tool: http://a.co/d/aX1XvE0
3M 08509 Auto Bedding and Glazing Compound: http://a.co/d/6xcjsch
Double Suction Cup for Glass: http://a.co/d/1vcSB6Q
Cab Weather Stripping Kit w/ Groove for Chrome 1961 - 66: Cab Weather Stripping Kit | Dennis Carpenter Ford Restoration Parts
Replacement glass: https://www.blueovaltruckparts.com/g...lass-4107.html
 
 
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