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wheel bearings

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Old 07-24-2007, 10:16 PM
menzfamfour menzfamfour is offline
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wheel bearings

how big of a job would it be to adjust the front wheel bearing of a 85 4x4 f150
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Old 07-25-2007, 12:51 AM
johnsnewtruck johnsnewtruck is offline
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you don't adjust them, you grease them and repack them

not that big of a job, provided you can get the bearings out
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Old 07-25-2007, 06:17 AM
srercrcr srercrcr is offline
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Not adjusted, but they should be installed (tightened) correctly. Not familiar with 4X4 spindle/bearing though.
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Old 07-25-2007, 10:42 AM
Tom84150 Tom84150 is offline
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This site will have a lot of threads about removing and installing bearings so check them out (everybody has there own way/opinion). Haynes/Chiltons manuals have nice exploded diagrams showing you were the bearings are on your truck. You could even check out the LMC catalog diagrams too. It's not such a big job for the bearings in the hub/rotor assembly, you will need specialized or self-made tools to knock out the old and seat the new races. You also have spindle bearings in this truck, and removing the spindles can be a real pain, and I have never replaced these bearings. I just re-packed them when I was changing out my ball joints.

-Tom
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Old 07-25-2007, 10:46 AM
mtflat mtflat is offline
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Since you said 'adjust' I'm guessing you think they're too loose?
Jack, jack stand, remove wheel, remove brake caliper if its dragging on the rotor too much.

Loosen the six allen head screws that hold the cap on the end of the hub. I don't remember if the wire keeper has to come out (it sits in a groove just inside the front of the hub). Also not sure if you need to remove the clip on the end of the hub.

You need a spanner - looks like an over-grown socket with 4 nibs. Remove what you have to inside the hub until you can see the locking/wratcheting assembly with 4 corresponding holes in the body - the spanner fits into this. Turn it clockwise to tighten. It'll make a clicking sound sorta like a torque wrench. Don't overtighten and make sure you can still move the rotor. You can back it off if you get it too tight.

Last edited by mtflat; 07-25-2007 at 10:50 AM.
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