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Correct steering geometry

 
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Old 01-14-2019, 02:07 PM
Emittim3
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Correct steering geometry

So I just bought a low mileage Excursion 2wd. Previous owner lifted it for looks. However I am doubting he did anything to correct the steering linkage geometry bevbeca I get wandering, bump steer andit is just a handful to drive.

Can someone show me a picture of your stock steering linkage? It will help me to determine if they put anything on to compensate for the lift. I am thinking I can get away with a drop pitman but wanted to make sure.

What are the dimensions of the stock pitman arm?


 
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Old 01-18-2019, 12:06 AM
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It appears you already have a drop pitman arm. Sounds like time to go after the usual suspects, like tie rods and ball joints. It's been a long while since I had a truck with twin I beam, but I do remember worn axle pivot bushings causing problems for me.
 
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Old 01-18-2019, 08:42 AM
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tie rods look parallel to the beams in the pics so i dont think you would be having a bump steer issue but it could just be the pics. the RWD ex caster spec is diffrent then the 4x4 do be certain yours is correct that will likely be the cause of the wander.
 
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Old 01-19-2019, 11:08 PM
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The bump steer is because the steering linkage is not the same length as the control arms. Not much you can do about that from a cost effective perspective.

The wandering is likely because of your positive caster (which I can see is atleast .5* positive from the pictures). If it's toed out as well, it will wander and drive like a complete mess.

My current F150 has a leveling kit and awful alignment with positive camber and insufficient caster, but drives great because it's toed in like it should be. This is not a hillbilly excuse for proper driving, my daily is a low mileage 2015 Camaro SS, the F150 really does drive well with just proper toe in and balanced caster/camber to prevent pulling.

I did performance alignments for several years before pursuing engineering, I'd get your alignment checked.
 
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Old 01-28-2019, 12:40 PM
Emittim3
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Originally Posted by callforfire View Post
It appears you already have a drop pitman arm. Sounds like time to go after the usual suspects, like tie rods and ball joints. It's been a long while since I had a truck with twin I beam, but I do remember worn axle pivot bushings causing problems for me.
Just to make sure of clarity, when you state axle pivot bushings, what are you speaking of? The bushings for the twin I beams themselves?
 

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