Ford F-250: Tires General Information Specs

Learn about your F-150's wheels and tires in depth. We'll break down the components that keep your truck rolling, common questions, and maintenance information.

By Thom Cannell - November 21, 2014

Super Duty Fords are unlike their smaller, less robust siblings, particularly in the wheels and tires they must use. Note that we said must. Differences start at the 8-lug wheels and LT E rated tires. Here’s everything you need to know, directly from Ford’s Greg Dabkowski, Product Development Engineer - Tires, Wheels & Jacks Engineering, and Dan Haakenson, Tire Development Technical Expert.

Tires

Ford develops specific guidelines for tires and the owner's manual states their load capacity and size, but no brand names. You may have favorites like BFG T/A KO2.

Every Super Duty is released with LT tires rated for an E load range. The rubber bands that make up a tire are called plys. The more plys a tire has, the more weight it can carry, and the more pressure it can take. LT means the tires are built for light trucks. Tires for Super Duties must be Load Range E or higher. These tires have 10 plys and can be aired up to 80 PSI.

The combination of load range and pressure is what ultimately supports the truck's ability to haul, tow, or carry. Ford’s engineers stated that although a load range C tire might be cheaper, don't buy it! Match the load range that came on the truck.

  • Figure 1. The tire's load rating will be indicated on the sidewall.
  • Figure 2. Read the door sticker to know what tires the vehicle came with from the factory.

Rims

Ford has no position on wheels other than that they meet the ratings stated in the owner's manual. That said, any wheel, regardless of how robust and slick it looks, must be capable of holding sufficient air pressure up to 80 PSI.

The wheel width is also critical; don't go below the width that came with the vehicle. It's not a Mustang where you can mess with rims and wheels for style. Change the aspect ratio of the tire and you may be changing load rating. Load capacity MUST match the OE rating.

Ford says there were many engineering years devoted to developing and optimizing the wheel-tire package for that truck. Anything that the customer changes may result, the engineers say, in a truck that doesn’t ride and steer as nicely as stock.

Figure 3. OEM 18' chrome rim.

Dual Rear Wheels

With dual rear wheels, nothing changes in its load range. A caution, according to Ford, is that the Tire and Rim Association (TRA) developed a standard where rear tires are LT/D rated for dual rear tires. This is not a clear cut recommendation by Ford; rather, use Ford's door sticker recommendation. Note that on many tires there will be two load index ratings, for instance, an LT 245/75R17 with two more numbers separated by a slash (XX/YY). The larger number indicates a single rear wheel load index, the smaller a dual rear wheel load index.

Figure 4. Super Duty with dual rear wheels.

TPMS

Beyond the tires, every truck or car built in the US since 2008 must be equipped with a TPMS, or tire pressure monitoring system. Some manufacturers infer tire pressure from the ABS system indirectly: deflated tires roll less easily. Direct systems use internal or external pressure sensors. They may report a low tire, or in upscale trucks, report individual pressures on the driver’s display. If you don’t have them, aftermarket suppliers offer TPMS systems.

  • Figure 5. Valve stem style tire pressure monitor.
  • Figure 6. Band style TPMS monitor.

Scheduled Maintenance

Ford recommends examining the tires every time the vehicle is brought in for service. There are a few more specific instructions, too:

  • Every 7,500 miles: Rotate the tires; inspect wheels for noise, wear, looseness, and drag; measure tread depth.
  • Every 60,000 miles: Replace wheel bearing grease.
  • Replace tires if the tread has fallen beneath 2/32" of an inch. Generally speaking, the other issues of noise, wear, and looseness are symptoms of other failing components related to suspension and steering. Check out our articles for wheels and suspension if there is trouble in these areas.

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Technical Service Bulletins

  • TSB 8-3-9 WHEEL LIP MOULDINGS LOOSE/WARPED (EXCLUDES KING RANCH) – BUILT BEFORE 10/5/2007
  • TSB 10-2-1 6.8L – CREW CAB – SINGLE REAR WHEEL (SRW) – DRONE/MOAN AT HIGHWAY SPEEDS – BUILT ON OR AFTER 3/18/2009
  • TSB 10-23-3 SINGLE REAR WHEEL (SRW) – ELECTRONIC LOCKING DIFFERENTIAL (ELD) – BUILT ON OR BEFORE 9/22/2010 – BINDING – UNABLE TO UNLOCK
  • TSB 12-6-10 PAINT DAMAGE/ROAD ABRASION TO DUAL REAR WHEEL (DRW) REAR BODY FENDERS SIDE(S)
  • TSB 05-26-24 VIBRATION DIAGNOSIS – TIRE/WHEEL RUNOUT
  • TSB 06-16-2 FRONT WHEEL BEARING NOISE – F-250/350 4X2 VEHICLES BUILT PRIOR TO 7/21/2006
  • TSB 08-24-2 VIBRATION DIAGNOSTICS – STEERING WHEEL NIBBLE – TIRE WHEEL RUNOUT AND BALANCE

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