coverting my 93 to 134a what type of oil is best? - Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums



1987 - 1996 F150 & Larger F-Series Trucks 1987 - 1996 Ford F-150, F-250, F-350 and larger pickups - including the 1997 heavy-duty F250/F350+ trucks

coverting my 93 to 134a what type of oil is best?

Reply
 
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 07-16-2010, 08:34 AM
shuttlevalve shuttlevalve is offline
Senior User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 404
shuttlevalve is starting off with a positive reputation.
coverting my 93 to 134a what type of oil is best?

Well the title says it all, but i just about have all the parts to start my convertion new hose off the compressor, accumulator, and red orfice the only major part iam missing is the new compressor that i'm getting next payday. I have enough 134 for the job and gages i just see a few options for oils (PAG?? Ester?? etc) in various weights whats the best for a old converted ford?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-16-2010, 08:59 AM
GlennFordx4's Avatar
GlennFordx4 GlennFordx4 is offline
Posting Guru
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: cape may county NJ
Posts: 1,412
GlennFordx4 is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.
I used ester when I did mine in my 93 bronco.
Glenn
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-16-2010, 09:01 AM
rla2005's Avatar
rla2005 rla2005 is online now
Post Fiend
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Illinois
Posts: 13,593
rla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud of
PAG46 is the most common oil used by Ford for R-134a systems.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-16-2010, 10:58 AM
fordman1090 fordman1090 is offline
Elder User
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 973
fordman1090 is starting off with a positive reputation.
I used PAG46. And it worked great, however the compressor will come with oil as well, but the oil depends on the freon your using so use accordingly.

It looks like you have most of the stuff ready to go, make sure to pre-fill the compressor and the dryer then put whats left of the oil in the line leading to the compressor.
Make sure the system is completely dry of all old oil and Freon, and run some flush through it. Even if most parts are new. Did the old compressor lock up or stop working? If so you really need to flush or replace the condenser in front of the radiator really well. The older compressors have nylon bushing that wear out, melt and plug the tiny holes in the condenser, then it only causes more problems in the future.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-16-2010, 03:31 PM
shuttlevalve shuttlevalve is offline
Senior User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 404
shuttlevalve is starting off with a positive reputation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fordman1090 View Post
I used PAG46. And it worked great, however the compressor will come with oil as well, but the oil depends on the freon your using so use accordingly.

It looks like you have most of the stuff ready to go, make sure to pre-fill the compressor and the dryer then put whats left of the oil in the line leading to the compressor.
Make sure the system is completely dry of all old oil and Freon, and run some flush through it. Even if most parts are new. Did the old compressor lock up or stop working? If so you really need to flush or replace the condenser in front of the radiator really well. The older compressors have nylon bushing that wear out, melt and plug the tiny holes in the condenser, then it only causes more problems in the future.
No, the system lost charge and the compressor was weeping oil from the halves and the line was leaking off the back of the compressor. whats the best method to flush the condensor and evap?? and make sure all the cleaning agent is out before i charge up the system?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-16-2010, 03:37 PM
rla2005's Avatar
rla2005 rla2005 is online now
Post Fiend
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Illinois
Posts: 13,593
rla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud ofrla2005 has much to be proud of
Interesting reading on this topic here: Auto A/C Flush Procedure
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-16-2010, 04:14 PM
fordman1090 fordman1090 is offline
Elder User
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 973
fordman1090 is starting off with a positive reputation.
I just bought a pressurized can of A/C flush. Then used compressed air to blow/dry it out of the system. Then pull a vac for 20-30min to get all the moisture left by compressed air out, then let it sit for 20-30min at a vacuum to make sure there are no leaks. Then charge.
Reply With Quote
 
 
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
1992 Ford F-150 5.0 A/C Advice tkerkela 1987 - 1996 F150 & Larger F-Series Trucks 1 09-16-2016 01:25 PM
R12 System to R134a System WA0GMH 1987 - 1996 F150 & Larger F-Series Trucks 9 10-08-2015 11:13 AM
89 AC converted to a134 now how much do Akzep69 1978 - 1996 Big Bronco 2 06-20-2015 05:07 PM
Suggestions for A/C Refit? kc5hwb 1973 - 1979 F-100 & Larger F-Series Trucks 4 11-03-2011 02:54 PM
WHat orfice tube do i get?? shuttlevalve Cooling, Heating, Ventilation & A/C 1 07-10-2010 11:01 PM


Go Back   Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums >

Tags
134a, 1995, 92, ac, compressor, f150, ford, kind, oil, type

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:54 PM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.