How To: 6.0L CCV Re-route - Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums



6.0L Power Stroke Diesel 2003 - 2007 F250, F350 pickup and F350+ Cab Chassis, 2003 - 2005 Excursion and 2003 - 2009 van

How To: 6.0L CCV Re-route

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  #1  
Old 08-29-2008, 11:41 PM
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Post How To: 6.0L CCV Re-route

Disclaimer: This is how to re-route the crankcase vent to the underside of the truck instead of back into the turbo intake tube. I take no responsibility for any damage that may incur from doing this mod.

This mod is relatively simple. I decided to do another write up as the one previously written is missing photos and might be hard to follow for some people. It takes about an hour or less depending upon your mechanical ability. The hardest part is locating 1" ID (inside diameter) heater hose. NAPA auto parts and Ace Hardware should sell it.

Parts Needed:
1 - 1/2" PVC Cap
2 - 1 1/4" - 1 1/2" Pipe Clamps
1 - 30 or 60 minute Epoxy
15-25' - 1" ID Heater Hose

Tools Needed:
1 - Opened Ended 10mm Wrench
1 - Side cutters
1 - Pliers or Small Channel Locks
1 - Flat Head Screwdriver
1 - Can of Brake Cleaner or Degreaser
1 - Pack of Zip Ties

Note: Allow your engine to cool as you will be reaching around and working with some hot parts. Also make sure you can go without driving your truck for a few hours as it will take time for the epoxy to cure.

Step 1: Remove the 2 lines from the coolant degas bottle using a pair of pliers to loosen the clamps. (#1, #2)

Step 2: Unplug the MAF Sensor and Filter minder plugs. (#3, #4)

Step 3: Remove the air filter housing. (#5)

Step 4: Loosen the clamp on the turbo inlet hose (#6)



Step 5: Remove the turbo inlet hose and post filter tube. It should slide straight up and out with the coolant lines removed.

Step 6: Loosen the clamp on the plastic intake tube where the crankcase vents. (#7)






Step 7: Remove the 2 10mm nuts on the bracket that attaches the intake tube to the FICM. (#8)

Step 8: Pull the 90* elbow out of the CCV filter. (#9) It snaps into place so just give it a gentle tug.

Step 9: Remove the plastic intake tube. Don't let anything get into the turbo, so cover it with a rag. (#10)



Step 10: Take a pair of side cutters and cut off the crip clamps over the hose that enters the intake tube. Remove the angled hose. (#11)

Step 11: Clean the tube and hole where the hose entered the tube with some brake cleaner or degreaser. (#11)



Step 12: Make sure the 1/2" PVC cap is clean and remove any stickers. (#12)



Step 13: Mix up the epoxy and coat the outside of the 1/2" PVC Cap.

Step 14: Insert the cap into the hole in the intake tube. (#13)





Step 15: Take the 90* elbow and cut the crimp clamp off the short hose. Attach the 1" ID heater hose to the 90* elbow and secure with a pipe clamp. (#14) I purchased 3/4" as I was misinformed on the correct size. So I used the original short hose and stuck the 3/4" hose into the 1" short hose and secured with a hose clamp.






Step 16: Run the heater hose down the frame rail to the rear of the truck and secure with zip ties. Be mindful of where the hose ends as it will eventually spit out some oily residue. It will take at least 20' to reach the bumper of a crew cab short bed, so adjust accordingly.

Step 17: Reassemble everything in reverse order.

Step 18: Let it sit for a few hours to allow the epoxy to fully cure. I recommend leaving it overnight.

If you have any questions or comments please ask here in the thread. Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 08-30-2008, 12:14 AM
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Solid Write Up!!!

Thanks and now i should be able to do this, been putting it off for a while but with these pics it will be way easier.

Rep Points Given!!!
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Old 08-30-2008, 07:14 AM
pete98cobra pete98cobra is offline
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Thank you for the write up. I was curious where the ccv was on the 6.0 . Didnt want to tear into my truck with out knowing where everything was. I will be making a shopping list. Did you put anything at the end of the tube to catch the oil ,or plan to put anything at the end of the tube?
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Old 08-30-2008, 07:19 AM
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Great post riggz - reps to ya also.

Hopefully you do not mind that I "scab" onto your post w/ a slightly modified version - just to give the readers some options to consider.

I did not want an open vent to possibly drip. I also wanted to keep a little vacuum pulling on the crancase (I think it helps pull moisture and combustion products from the crankcase as the oil gets hot.

My ccv re-route is to a coalescing filter element that I installed on the drivers frame rail and then back to the same turbo inlet tube. The hose run to the filter element is an initial vertical rise up and over the brake master cylinder and then a long constant vertical drop to the filter (no liquid legs in the hose run). The return line is a long constant vertical rise. This configuration is to maximize liquid disengagement from the vent lines and to eliminate backpressure from liquid legs caused by dips and rises on the same run of hose. It took awhile to saturate the filter element (maybe a month) but now I am constantly draining small amounts of oil from the filter drain valve.

I will post my procedure in a following post.
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Old 08-30-2008, 07:20 AM
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http://s251.photobucket.com/albums/g...view=slideshow

<TABLE style="WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-COLLAPSE: collapse" cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=924 border=0 x:str><COLGROUP><COL style="WIDTH: 693pt; mso-width-source: userset; mso-width-alt: 33792" width=924><TBODY><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl25 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>Materials List</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>Filter housing and mounting bracket</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>15 feet of 5/8 inch ID heater hose (to be cut into two pieces). You may have to buy two 10 ft lengths.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>3 inches of 1 inch ID heater hose</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>Two 3/8 inch diameter stainless steel carriage bolts, 1.5 inches long with 4 flat washers, two lock washers, and two nuts</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>4 stainless steel hose clamps for the 5/8 inch ID hose connections</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>3 stainless steel hose clamps for the 1 inch ID hose connections</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>2 plastic barbed hose adapters (1 inch ID to 5/8 inch ID)</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 13.5pt" height=18><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 13.5pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=18>1 1/2 inch diameter stainless steel carriage bolt, 2 inches long with 2 flat washers, a lock washer, and a nut.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

<TABLE style="WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-COLLAPSE: collapse" cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=924 border=0 x:str><COLGROUP><COL style="WIDTH: 693pt; mso-width-source: userset; mso-width-alt: 33792" width=924><TBODY><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl25 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>Install</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 25.5pt" height=34><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 25.5pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=34>Installed the ccv re-route this past weekend. I chose to install a filter on the frame rail and leave the vent piped up to the same spot on the turbo air inlet boot (pre-turbo).</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>It took me - about 3 hours. Probably should only be a 2 hour job.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>Steps:</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 51pt" height=68><TD class=xl26 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 51pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=68>1. Mount the filter on the drivers side frame rail (I bought the filter from another Diesel Forum from one of the members). Use Stainless Steel hardware and lock washers. You should have two acceptable holes already in the frame rail that you can use, if not, you may need to drill a hole. The filter mounting bracket is offset a little to avoid the emergency brake cable that runs along the frame rail. When installed, the oil vapor supply line from the engine will attach to the lower filter connector and the clean vapor return line will be attached to the upper filter connector.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl26 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 51pt" height=68><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 51pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=68>2. Run 5/8 inch heater hose (both supply and return hoses) from the filter you just installed along the bottom of the truck and up into the engine compartment. Both runs of hose (each about 7 feet in length), should come up into the engine well between the brake master cylinder and the coolant degas bottle. Note - before feeding the hose up into the engine compartment, there is a narrow channel on the bottom of the truck near the fire wall that you can run the hoses through to keep them out of the way.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 25.5pt" height=34><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 25.5pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=34>3. With needle nose pliers, remove the two small coolant lines that connect to the degas bottle. Also remove the MAF sensor plug and remove the "filter minder" by pulling it out of your air filter end cap (it is tight, but pull and twist slightly and it will come out).</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 76.5pt" height=102><TD class=xl26 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 76.5pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=102>4. Loosen the hose clamp that connects the air filter end cap / MAF tube to the turbo air-inlet boot (the bottom of this boot is where the ccv vapors are introduced). Un-latch the two clamps that hold the air filter onto the end cap / MAF tube. Lift up on the air filter and remove the air filter end cap / MAF tube by leaning it towards the cab of the truck and lifting it up out of the air filter retaining slots (refer to a good air filter change procedure to make this easier). Then pull this end cap / MAF tube out of the turbo inlet boot and set it aside for now. You also may want to remove the air filter itself to get it out of the way. This will also be a good time to change the air filter element if the timing or mileage is close to when you want to change it. AT THIS POINT, THE TURBO INLET SYSTEM IS OPEN. MAKE SURE YOU DO NOT LET ANY FOREIGN OBJECTS GET INTO THIS INTAKE SYSTEM.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl26 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 38.25pt" height=51><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 38.25pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=51>5. Underneath the air inlet boot to the turbo, you can see the ccv elbow fitting and short hose segment that is located on top of the crank case vent filter (a rectangular black box located on top the engine between the valve cover and FICM bracket). Now, loosen the hose clamp that connects the air inlet boot to the turbo.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 38.25pt" height=51><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 38.25pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=51>6. While still inserted in the ccv vent filter, cut the clamp (actually it is a narrow crimp ring) that connects the ccv vent hose to the plastic ccv elbow. You will need a pair of dikes to cut the crimp ring at the crimp. You may or may not have to pull the hose off of this elbow before proceeding to the next step. Evaluate step 7 first and then decide which is the best way on your vehicle to remove the turbo inlet boot and ccv elbow.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 76.5pt" height=102><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 76.5pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=102>7. Carefully remove the air inlet boot from the turbo inlet flange. After pulling it loose (if you have not removed the hose from the ccv elbow) you will have to rotate it counter clockwise about 90 degrees or so in order to properly pull the ccv plastic elbow up and out of its position on the crank case vent filter. If you have already removed the hose from the ccv elbow, the turbo inlet boot will pull right out. After properly rotating the plastic elbow, remove it from the vent filter. Remember, it must be pointing to the front of the engine which is parallel to the engine valve cover (about 90 degrees). This will line up the tabs on the elbow with the grooves inside the vent filter nozzle and prevent breaking the tabs when removing the elbow. All necessary ccv components have now been removed.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 25.5pt" height=34><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 25.5pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=34>8. You may now want to clean the inside of the air inlet boot downstream of where the crank case vapors are introduced since its is now accessible and most likely has oil in it. This will be the last time cleaning is necessary since that is why this mod is being performed.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 25.5pt" height=34><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 25.5pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=34>9. If you have not yet done so, remove the plastic ccv elbow from the short ccv vent hose that is still attached to the air inlet boot. Next, install a NEW short piece (2-3 inches) of 1 inch ID rubber hose on the ccv elbow using a hose clamp.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 25.5pt" height=34><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 25.5pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=34>10. Install a 1 inch to 5/8 inch (all ID measurements) plastic barbed reducer on the newly installed 2-3 inch long (1 inch ID) hose segment you just installed on the ccv elbow.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 38.25pt" height=51><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 38.25pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=51>11. Re-install the ccv elbow and then rotate it to the new position (pointing towards the degas bottle). It is now ready to connect to the new hose that feeds the new frame rail ccv filter. MAKE SURE THE PLASTIC CCV VENT ELBOW IS PROPERLY INSERTED INTO THE ENGINE MOUNTED CCV FILTER WITH THE O-RING PROPERLY IN PLACE TO ENSURE MINIMAL OIL LEAKAGE in the future.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 25.5pt" height=34><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 25.5pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=34>12. Connect the 5/8 inch hose that is attached to the lower fitting on the frame rail filter onto the barbed hose connector that has just been installed on the plastic ccv elbow on the crank case vent filter that is on the engine.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 38.25pt" height=51><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 38.25pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=51>13. MAKE SURE that this hose was placed up and over the front edge of the degas bottle to provide a high spot so that any quickly condensed oil can immediately drain back to the crankcase. You can also run this hose under the degas bottle and then up and over the brake master cylinder to provide the high spot. If you do this, make sure the hose is not pinched or restricted.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 38.25pt" height=51><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 38.25pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=51>14. MAKE SURE that there is no slack in the line, no pinched points, and no low accumulation points in the hose. IT IS CRITICAL TO NOT LEAVE LOW SPOTS WHERE OIL CAN COLLECT AND BLOCK VAPOR FLOW. There should be a constant slope upward to the high spot on the degas bottle and then a constant slope downward all the way to the filter. This minimizes pressure drop and eliminates restrictions.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 25.5pt" height=34><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 25.5pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=34>15. Install a 1 inch to 5/8 inch (all ID measurements) plastic barbed reducer onto the segment of original ccv vent hose that is connected to the bottom of the turbo inlet boot.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 38.25pt" height=51><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 38.25pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=51>16. Connect the 5/8 inch hose that comes from the upper fitting on the frame rail filter onto the barbed hose connector that was just installed in the ccv vent tubing to the air inlet boot. This requires putting the air inlet boot back into position, but not tightening the hose clamp at the turbo until the vent line from the filter has been installed and tightened.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>17. Adjust all the hoses and the turbo inlet boot into their final position and then tighten all clamps.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 25.5pt" height=34><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 25.5pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=34>18. Re-install the air filter and end cap / MAF tube. Make sure the air filter assembly is properly fitted and sealed, ensure all components are in their final position, and tighten all clamps (hose clamps and air filter clamps).</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>19. Re-attach the two small hoses to the coolant degas bottle and re-connect the MAF sensor plug and re-install the air filter-minder.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>20. Make sure the new ccv filter is attached tightly to the frame rail and verify that the drain plug / valve is in the closed position.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 25.5pt" height=34><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 25.5pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=34>21. Check to see if there were any low spots that would trap liquid. This may require unhooking the hoses at the filter and cutting a little off to be able to pull the hoses tight.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17>21. Install tie-raps in various places to keep everything in the right place.</TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 12.75pt" height=17><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 12.75pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=17></TD></TR><TR style="HEIGHT: 38.25pt" height=51><TD class=xl24 style="BORDER-RIGHT: #d4d0c8; BORDER-TOP: #d4d0c8; BORDER-LEFT: #d4d0c8; WIDTH: 693pt; BORDER-BOTTOM: #d4d0c8; HEIGHT: 38.25pt; BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" width=924 height=51>22. Lastly, under the truck, install a bolt in a metal seam that forms a perfect "channel" for the two hoses (up near the point where the hoses turn and go up into the engine compartment). With the bolt installed, this seam (that runs perpendicular to the bottom of the truck for a foot or so from the fire wall) is perfect for keeping the run of hose tightly up against the bottom of the truck until it makes the last "unsupported" run to the filter connectors.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
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  #6  
Old 08-30-2008, 07:52 AM
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Nice write up guys. Something to think about too is the elbow that came out of the intake makes a great turn down at the end of the hose.
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Old 08-30-2008, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pete98cobra
Thank you for the write up. I was curious where the ccv was on the 6.0 . Didnt want to tear into my truck with out knowing where everything was. I will be making a shopping list. Did you put anything at the end of the tube to catch the oil ,or plan to put anything at the end of the tube?
Glad you liked it and thanks for the rep points! I think I will be adding some sort of filter to the end of the hose. Probably a PCV type that can vent into the open air.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bismic View Post
Great post riggz - reps to ya also.

Hopefully you do not mind that I "scab" onto your post w/ a slightly modified version - just to give the readers some options to consider.

I did not want an open vent to possibly drip. I also wanted to keep a little vacuum pulling on the crancase (I think it helps pull moisture and combustion products from the crankcase as the oil gets hot.

My ccv re-route is to a coalescing filter element that I installed on the drivers frame rail and then back to the same turbo inlet tube. The hose run to the filter element is an initial vertical rise up and over the brake master cylinder and then a long constant vertical drop to the filter (no liquid legs in the hose run). The return line is a long constant vertical rise. This configuration is to maximize liquid disengagement from the vent lines and to eliminate backpressure from liquid legs caused by dips and rises on the same run of hose. It took awhile to saturate the filter element (maybe a month) but now I am constantly draining small amounts of oil from the filter drain valve.

I will post my procedure in a following post.

I have no problem with you adding the way you did it. More options is always better! One thing... can you post up where you purchased and what model the filter housing & bracket is?
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  #8  
Old 08-30-2008, 01:40 PM
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Err, not a PCV filter... I mean to say breather filter. I'm gunna stop by AutoZone and see what I can find.
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Old 08-30-2008, 05:01 PM
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Thanks for the great post with photos. With me a picture is worth 1,000 words. I am planning to do this in a few months. Thanks again.
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Old 08-30-2008, 11:35 PM
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I've located a breather filter that should work with a 1" ID heater hose. I found it at AutoZone. Luber Liner breather filter model # BF3402. I plan on redoing mine with a 1" hose. Hopefully a moderator will edit my original post when I do to add some pictures.
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Old 08-31-2008, 06:13 PM
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Great work guys...rep points to both of you
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Old 09-06-2008, 11:36 PM
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What about routing it through an air compressor water/oil seperator mounted to the frame, then back to the turbo inlet? That way you could see how much oil is in it, since it is a clear cylinder and empty it through the drain when you do an oil change.
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Old 09-07-2008, 12:20 AM
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I don't think there is THAT much oil that is coming out of it. I've purchased a breather filter that will mount to the end of the 1" hose. I can change out the element or the whole filter there. There is no oil yet at the end of the hose after 300 miles or so.
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Old 09-07-2008, 01:23 AM
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Just a thought, I just don't want to my pride and joy sitting there with an oil spot under her. This is Chevy country and they look for any little thing to harass you about, but they all shut up when I ask em to hook up with me for a pulloff!
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Old 09-07-2008, 01:38 AM
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