Notices
Modular V10 (6.8l)  
Sponsored by:
Sponsored by:

Plug change with photos

 
  #46  
Old 04-01-2006, 08:58 AM
Wolfboro's Avatar
Wolfboro
Wolfboro is offline
Elder User
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: FL
Posts: 545
Wolfboro is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.
tmehrkam,

Thanks for the information . Is there a”spring” somewhere in the spark plug boot ? if so, is there a certain orientation of the spring (when replacing the rubber boots) ?

Did the original boots come off easily or any trick used to remove them?

Also I would like to know if you had any “back-up plan” just in case a spark plug is broken during the removal ?
Thanks for your response
Ken
 
  #47  
Old 04-01-2006, 10:26 AM
Krewat's Avatar
Krewat
Krewat is offline
Admin Newbie
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Long Island USA
Posts: 39,956
Krewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputation
Change the boots. The springs fit eitherway.

USE ANTI-SIEZE ON THE THREADS!

DO NOT LISTEN to people who say lubricated threads allow too much torque.

Balderdash...
 
  #48  
Old 04-01-2006, 10:27 AM
Krewat's Avatar
Krewat
Krewat is offline
Admin Newbie
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Long Island USA
Posts: 39,956
Krewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputation
Originally Posted by PMDRACER
A preferable method would be what GM used in the mid-eighties for the head bolts on the 4-bangers - torque to yield. I forget the exact procedural numbers, but you would bring the head bolt to something like 30 ft-lbs, and then rotate the bolt another 180 degrees past that.
You should brush up on Ford's modular motors.

Almost everything in the motor is a torque-to-yield.
 
  #49  
Old 04-01-2006, 11:35 AM
captchas
captchas is offline
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: north west new jersey
Posts: 7,988
captchas has a great reputation on FTE.captchas has a great reputation on FTE.captchas has a great reputation on FTE.captchas has a great reputation on FTE.
torque-to-yield has been around a long time. vw started useing that back around 1981 .care to try a 855 cummings motor 300 plus pounds " i think it was 375" plus 180 degs that will bust a arm and shoulder.
arp states use a light oil on their bolts now.so yes i would coat a plug.esp. when we know of problems with steel into alloythen mabe some day ford will get wise like the marine companys and use stainless steel for the plugs and bolts into alloy
 
  #50  
Old 04-01-2006, 11:27 PM
biz4two's Avatar
biz4two
biz4two is offline
Post Fiend
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Albuquerque
Posts: 5,828
biz4two has a great reputation on FTE.biz4two has a great reputation on FTE.biz4two has a great reputation on FTE.biz4two has a great reputation on FTE.
Originally Posted by jstutz101
Is it necessary to replace the boot when changing the plugs?
No...it is not necessary, but is certainly recommended. If you wait for the 100,000 mile change...the boots will probably be in poor shape.

biz

________________________________
2003 F250 SD SC 142" XLT FX4 V10 Auto 4x4 3.73s
 
  #51  
Old 04-02-2006, 12:31 AM
PMDRACER's Avatar
PMDRACER
PMDRACER is offline
Senior User
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 161
PMDRACER is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.
Originally Posted by krewat
You should brush up on Ford's modular motors.

Almost everything in the motor is a torque-to-yield.

Not sure where the smart-*** tone is coming from, but why bother. If it breaks I have a warranty. I build and race musclecars. I'm not about to waste my time wrenching on my daily driver.
 
  #52  
Old 04-02-2006, 05:46 AM
captchas
captchas is offline
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: north west new jersey
Posts: 7,988
captchas has a great reputation on FTE.captchas has a great reputation on FTE.captchas has a great reputation on FTE.captchas has a great reputation on FTE.
Originally Posted by krewat
You should brush up on Ford's modular motors.

Almost everything in the motor is a torque-to-yield.
art
tty has been around a very long time and proven it self well . first i read any thing about was in big diesels in the 70's. new style gasketing made it needed all round in all the brands.

and those spark plug boots .change them as a safty item .for the extra cost it can save a lot of time and a possible miss fire down the line by leting moister in under the boot and plug seal
 

Last edited by captchas; 04-02-2006 at 05:49 AM.
  #53  
Old 04-02-2006, 07:36 AM
Big Orn's Avatar
Big Orn
Big Orn is offline
Post Fiend
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: NE Texas
Posts: 5,643
Big Orn has a very good reputation on FTE.Big Orn has a very good reputation on FTE.Big Orn has a very good reputation on FTE.
Originally Posted by PMDRACER
Not sure where the smart-*** tone is coming from, but why bother. If it breaks I have a warranty. I build and race musclecars. I'm not about to waste my time wrenching on my daily driver.
Take it easy, PMDRACER.

We've seen misleading posts take a few folks down 40 miles of bad road and just want everybody to be on the same page. We're not talking about racers or trickin' or pimpin'...we just want the right info out there.

There should have been a step by step guide to remedy this problem when it first began in the late-90's. The way it is, over a half-dozen years later, we're the only ones that really help. And the "we" in we're is "us", you and I.
 
  #54  
Old 04-02-2006, 08:35 AM
Krewat's Avatar
Krewat
Krewat is offline
Admin Newbie
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Long Island USA
Posts: 39,956
Krewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputation
Originally Posted by Big Orn
We've seen misleading posts take a few folks down 40 miles of bad road and just want everybody to be on the same page. We're not talking about racers or trickin' or pimpin'...we just want the right info out there.
Like "don't put anything on the plug threads, you'll get the wrong torque"...

So many professional mechanics here say to use anti-sieze for the obvious reasons, I've used it on all my aluminum-headed motors, etc. etc.

To have someone say don't lubricate the threads or you'll get too much torque, well, that's just absurd.

 
  #55  
Old 04-02-2006, 02:24 PM
captchas
captchas is offline
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: north west new jersey
Posts: 7,988
captchas has a great reputation on FTE.captchas has a great reputation on FTE.captchas has a great reputation on FTE.captchas has a great reputation on FTE.
don't lube the threads sure why then dose arp say to lightly lube the threads when torqeing their bolts. or why did cummins always say lightly oil when assembling .,jeppers even chevy said that back in the 50's . a very light coat of oil has always been in the books to stop any possible binding when torqeing down.
never seize on alloy heads for spark plugs is also old school. the 2 metals have always reacted against each other . nickel and stainless help stop it.
sorry dude but this very old time wrench disagrees with you. been were you are. drag raced small and big blocks for years . even had n stock and h gas national record way back with a blue flame I6 and a 272 inch small block.just gave up racing drag boats "502 inch" last summer but still untop of the news . i have never dry torqed any bolt ever and never had a problem
 
  #56  
Old 04-02-2006, 10:28 PM
PMDRACER's Avatar
PMDRACER
PMDRACER is offline
Senior User
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 161
PMDRACER is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.
Originally Posted by captchas
don't lube the threads sure why then dose arp say to lightly lube the threads when torqeing their bolts. or why did cummins always say lightly oil when assembling .,jeppers even chevy said that back in the 50's . a very light coat of oil has always been in the books to stop any possible binding when torqeing down.
never seize on alloy heads for spark plugs is also old school. the 2 metals have always reacted against each other . nickel and stainless help stop it.
sorry dude but this very old time wrench disagrees with you. been were you are. drag raced small and big blocks for years . even had n stock and h gas national record way back with a blue flame I6 and a 272 inch small block.just gave up racing drag boats "502 inch" last summer but still untop of the news . i have never dry torqed any bolt ever and never had a problem
I NEVER said do not use anti-seize on the plugs, or any threaded surface. Go back and read my post. Better yet, I'll quote it for you:
I would never assemble aluminum and steel parts together without anti-seize.
At the same time, I have some homework for you so-called professional mechanics. Take any threaded assembly such as a head bolt and remove all traces of oil on the bolt and the threaded hole. Torque the bolt to 60 ft lbs and mark where the bolt head ends up. Now remove the bolt, lightly oil it with engine oil and re-torque. You will see the bolt will have actually rotated farther this time.

Conclusion? The lube prevented the bolt head and threads from galling and the subsequent friction from causing the same torque reading, but at a different stopping point, with the latter lubed assembly actually pulling harder on the threads. ARP others have known this for years and have recommended their torque values based on a lubed assembly because a threaded bolt will be pulled farther when oiled. Also, due to different coefficients of friction from one lubrication agent to another, it is imperative to make sure that the correct agent is used when assembling parts. Depending on the parts assembly and/or manufacturer, assembly instructions may call for a "light oil" such as Marvel Mystery, others call for for engine oil, and still some anti-seize.

So what's the point? If Ford calls for a torque measurement with dry threads (as tmehrkam stated) and now we lube the threads with anti-seize, what do you have when you get to the high side of the measurment range? An over-torqed assembly, and possibly stripped threads.

The obvious solution is to torque to the lower end of the measurement range which is exactly what I commented on from tmehrkam's post.
 
  #57  
Old 04-03-2006, 08:11 AM
SuperBlue's Avatar
SuperBlue
SuperBlue is offline
Elder User
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Mesa, Arizona
Posts: 747
SuperBlue is starting off with a positive reputation.
No Fear! I will do mine when the time comes, thanks for the write up!
 
  #58  
Old 04-03-2006, 09:32 PM
someday
someday is offline
Posting Guru
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: midwest
Posts: 1,307
someday is starting off with a positive reputation.
has anybody ever indexed for the v10 or any engine for that matter?
 
  #59  
Old 04-05-2006, 07:10 AM
Berticus
Berticus is offline
New User
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 18
Berticus is starting off with a positive reputation.
That is awesome. I was going to ask in here just about this.

Thank you, Thank you, Robert.
 
  #60  
Old 04-05-2006, 03:17 PM
inoverdrive
inoverdrive is offline
New User
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 12
inoverdrive is starting off with a positive reputation.
Great post trehrkam...I have a 1999 E450 V10..motor home..Being 7 years old I want to change the spark plugs..(48000 miles)
Would the procedure and torque specs be the same as you mentioned?
I'm an old time mechanic ( when a tune up included points and condenser!!)
When the weather warms up I'd like to tackle that job myself..
I'm really happy I found this site and your post..
Thank you...Ken
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Plug change with photos


Contact Us - About Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.