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Plug change with photos

 
  #31  
Old 03-23-2006, 10:48 AM
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Originally Posted by tmehrkam
Life time warrenties are the norm. When I see that I assume that I will spend the rest of my life changing the part.
LOL! I hear ya, tmehrkam And that's about right on some of that junk.

You're a good sport...
 
  #32  
Old 03-23-2006, 01:15 PM
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My job went as well , only diff, after trying compressed air, I got my shop vac out
and connected a piece of 3/8 vacum line... used it to clean the holes out.. I found
it was quicker and more effective.. and the torque wrench was very helpful...
 
  #33  
Old 03-23-2006, 01:40 PM
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tmehrkam, good points, all!

I deal with locally owned shops, and usually get jobber prices on stuff because of family relationships.

The level of the parts is obviously quite different. The local guy doesn't buy skids of starters made in China and slap their label on the box. He buys stuff from local (regional) quality rebuilders or brand-new stuff that was made by a "New World" company (as opposed to third-world).

I have never bought a part from Autozone, Auto Barn, Aid Auto, or whatever national brand there is. NAPA I've dealt with a few times, but made sure the part was at least as good as original. Timken bearings for a 8.8" Ford rear rebuild, for instance, I got from NAPA in NAPA-branded boxes...

It's just funny, is all, I always shied away from Motorcraft-branded stuff.
 
  #34  
Old 03-23-2006, 05:40 PM
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tmehrkam,


What was the mileage on your truck before you decided to change the plugs?

Thank you,
RustyFuryIII
 
  #35  
Old 03-23-2006, 09:13 PM
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106,000 miles
 
  #36  
Old 03-27-2006, 11:04 PM
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i thought it was a no-no to use antiseize on the threads because of interfering with proper torque
 
  #37  
Old 03-28-2006, 06:10 AM
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If you look in the Motorcraft spark plug application manual they state that AntiSeize is not necessary. If you use it then you should reduce the torque.

They specify a range of torque. I used the recommended torque in the Manual which is in the lower end of the range.

From my experiance with Al threads a little lubrication is not a bad thing. I used very little AntiSeize just enough to coat the threads. It makes me sleep better at night. It should at least keep the threads on the plug from rusting.

On the other hand I do not expect I will be changing the plugs again for a very long time. 100,000 Miles.
 
  #38  
Old 03-28-2006, 06:23 AM
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Look at this document on page 10

http://www.fordinstallersupport.com/...logs/spark.pdf

The motorcraft web site says that AntiSeize can be helpful on Al heads.
 
  #39  
Old 03-28-2006, 09:24 AM
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There is no such thing as "correct torque" on un-lubricated threads. If they are not lubricated, you just can't get the correct torque. You can take a stab at it, but no way is the torque going to be near correct.

The anti-sieze will HELP get the correct torque, AND keep the iron-to-aluminum corrosion to a minimum.
 
  #40  
Old 03-28-2006, 09:52 AM
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Thatís right, Art. This is been covered many times, but with new folks coming onboard it needs to be repeated. The procedure of torquing the plugs suffers from inaccuracy due to inconsistent friction between the plug and headís internal threads. That is why we stress here in the V10 forum to lightly coat the threads on the plug evenly with anit-seize so that each thread is covered. This developes the proper torque while isolating the two different metals.

Some machine shops also suggest re-tapping each hole for "perfect" torque, but I don't think that would apply here. JMHO on that. Besides there is no "perfect torque" that I am aware of without going into thread distortion and the like, which is impossible in this application.
 
  #41  
Old 03-28-2006, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Big Orn
Some machine shops also suggest re-tapping each hole for "perfect" torque, but I don't think that would apply here.
Yup, machinists usually "run a tap through" on head bolt holes, main caps, etc, to make sure there's nothing left inside after the acid-bath.

Doesn't apply to spark plug holes
 
  #42  
Old 03-31-2006, 06:27 PM
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05 and a new tool to change the plugs "9/16 plug socket".hay wifie i need a bigger snapon tool box.
thanks for the link man. that info on the newest plug design is interesting thread over the taper seat . makes good sence. seal it under the thread and reduce the chance of one seizing into the head
 
  #43  
Old 03-31-2006, 08:58 PM
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Is it necessary to replace the boot when changing the plugs?
 
  #44  
Old 04-01-2006, 12:36 AM
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Originally Posted by tmehrkam
If you look in the Motorcraft spark plug application manual they state that AntiSeize is not necessary. If you use it then you should reduce the torque.

They specify a range of torque. I used the recommended torque in the Manual which is in the lower end of the range.
You are 100% correct. Adding lube to the threads will increase the amount the spark plug rotates before torque is reached. In applications where failed threads is common this can be a big issue. But at the same time, I would never assemble aluminum and steel parts together without anti-seize. Going to the low end of the scale is a good bet.
A preferable method would be what GM used in the mid-eighties for the head bolts on the 4-bangers - torque to yield. I forget the exact procedural numbers, but you would bring the head bolt to something like 30 ft-lbs, and then rotate the bolt another 180 degrees past that.
 
  #45  
Old 04-01-2006, 08:21 AM
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As with any assembly line effort, the taps, dies used for bolts (plugs holes is this case)are changed when a go/no-go gage requires it. The go/no-go gage may be different and may be called different names, but the concept is the same. Every thread, be it male or female, is not checked individually with thread micrometers...too costly. So the best we can do is keep it in the engineered tolerances. According to some standard somewhere, the material (alum alloy in this case) is tested for yield of thread with no galling. The only way of doing that is to use lubricant. Torque is then calculated using the lube for that application.

Picky? Yes, but we have to convey our knowledge or there will always be plug blowouts.
 

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