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How to remove Rotors that are rusted on Ford Expedition

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Old 11-12-2014, 11:41 AM
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How to remove Rotors that are rusted on Ford Expedition

 
  #31  
Old 02-02-2006, 11:12 PM
Kevdadi
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I'd have to recommend the grinder approach, cutting yourself a piece of "pie," then taking that chunk and use a very big chisel (happened to be laying around in the garage) and wedging it against the hub then taking a big freakin' hammer and driving it home. Eventually it's gonna peel like an orange. I did happen to try the screw method recommended above with heavy duty bolts (thickest that would fit through the caliper mounting holes) and they both snapped, there was that much force required.

Drink plenty of booze, get more booze, get creative as to what words you'll come up with, and be persistent. I didn't have a torch or a sawzall, but the angle grinder was the best thing to use in hacking up the rotor... be sure to wear gloves and goggles.
 
  #32  
Old 02-02-2006, 11:14 PM
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I did snap the handles of an old school miner's pick axe, the sledge hammer approach proved futile, and also the leverage of a prybar with a pipe also got bent to hell as well.
 
  #33  
Old 02-02-2006, 11:25 PM
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I have seen a bunch of these, when they are really bad, order rotors and get the torch. On the really bad ones the rotors have to be heated around the outer edge of the rotor hub face, then hit with the sledge, if that still dont work you have to start cutting into the rotor from the middle out, mind you this gets the rotor glowing red...after the rotor cracks, a few good slugs and it comes off. If you don't want to replace the rotors and they still have enough to cut, take them to a shop that has an oncar brake lathe, this will save you time and headaches..so dont start slaming on the rotor just yet. Hope this helps.
 
  #34  
Old 02-03-2006, 03:34 PM
97 WS6 T/A Conv
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After reading about the frozen rotors I removed all of my rotors within a few months of purchasing the truck (Jan 04) and I applied a bit of antisieze to the contact area of the hub and rotor to prevent this problem for when I do need a brake job. Just something for all to consider.
 
  #35  
Old 02-06-2006, 07:36 AM
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Antisieze

This is a great idea---but be sure it's applied especially to the 1/2in wide EDGE of the hub---not just the face. Most of the corrosion occurs between the edge of the hub and the inside edge of the rotor. At least that was the problem in my case.
 
  #36  
Old 11-04-2009, 04:48 PM
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THANK YOU sanman1969!

While not a Ford owner, nor enthusiast, you solved a problem than has frustrated me for several days. Good to know the jack bolt trick works equally well on a Chevy Silverado. Having moved to the upper mid-west several years ago from the deserts of California, this is the first time I've had heavy corrosion as an issue during a brake job. 3 days of PB blaster, hammers and frustration were solved in 10 minutes and $3 worth of nuts and bolts.
 
  #37  
Old 11-04-2009, 06:17 PM
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I'm in hopes that here in Va, they won't be too badly rusted on. I'll find out in a few weeks. Great pointers by all BTW. I also think I'll place sheet of felt paper behind the new rotors. What do you all think? Is there a better material that will resist decay or would anti seize just be better?

Tim
 
  #38  
Old 11-04-2009, 07:04 PM
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We had to replace the whole hub assembly with the rotors still frozen on.
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  #39  
Old 11-05-2009, 01:03 PM
alloro
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Originally Posted by tseekins View Post
I also think I'll place sheet of felt paper behind the new rotors. What do you all think?
I wouldn't do it. With the felt in there your rotor is not sitting firmly against the hub.
 
  #40  
Old 11-07-2009, 06:30 PM
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Soak the rotor with pb blaster where it meets the hub, let it sit a while, spray it again, then loosen the lug nuts on the wheel by about 1/2 turn or so, then slowly back the truck about 3-5 feet or so. The weight of the vehicle/engine will pop the rotors from the rust. Don't over do it, just a couple of feet is all it takes. The popping noise can be pretty loud. Bring the truck forward, jack it up, remove the wheels and caliper, then tap the rotors, they should fall off easier. Worked for me, keep in mind I also planned to replace the rotors anyway and rebuilt the calipers, etc, this trick just makes it go quicker.
 
  #41  
Old 11-09-2009, 09:49 AM
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Originally Posted by tseekins View Post
I'm in hopes that here in Va, they won't be too badly rusted on. I'll find out in a few weeks. Great pointers by all BTW. I also think I'll place sheet of felt paper behind the new rotors. What do you all think? Is there a better material that will resist decay or would anti seize just be better?

Tim
Use the anti-seize. I think you are asking for trouble by using felt paper which I can see trapping moisture and furthering the rust issue in addition to the reasons mentioned by alloro.
 
  #42  
Old 11-09-2009, 07:04 PM
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Originally Posted by MisterCMK View Post
I can see trapping moisture and furthering the rust issue
Good point, I didn't think of that one.
 
  #43  
Old 11-11-2009, 10:05 PM
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I tried all the tricks mentioned here. Spend three evening on the right front rotor of my exp without getting the rotor to budge. I broke down & bought a 12 inch three jaw puller. Best possible tool for this type of brake job. Popped the rotors off with little effort. I've used it on three other cars & it makes the job real easy. Pushing 50, I can muscle it like I used to. Dont have the patience either.
 
  #44  
Old 11-12-2009, 07:42 AM
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  #45  
Old 11-12-2009, 09:08 PM
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I have one rotor that is bad. Do you think I should replace both sides?
 

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