WHAT WEIGHT OIL ARE YOU RUNNING IN THE FE's - Page 3 - Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums

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View Poll Results: WEIGHT OIL ARE YOU RUNNING IN THE FE's
5w20
2.12%
5w30
5.51%
5w40
2.54%
10w30
27.54%
10w40
21.19%
15w40
11.86%
15w50
2.12%
20w50
16.10%
30w
10.17%
50w
0.85%
Voters: 236. You may not vote on this poll

WHAT WEIGHT OIL ARE YOU RUNNING IN THE FE's

 
  #31  
Old 12-07-2004, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by yomow
I was told by a bearing mfg. that the oil wts. & API service grades [se,sf,sg],and so on is what the bearing mfg. want you to use for the life of your bearing & ring's . They build them in a way to last so long. For the engine mfg. Ford in our case. Now, no one has addressed the API service grade that is the service duty of the oil .

Don
We're in the FE forum, so think about what the API service grades were back in the late 50's and 60's... if they even existed. Today's oils are far superior to what they recommended back them - and I have never opened up a set of aftermarket crank/rod bearings and found an oil recommendation

What I'm getting at is that anything you buy off the shelf these days has an API service rating that is so far ahead of the original FE recommendations that there is no need to even bring it up. I think it's a moot point.

As for EgoMan running straight-weight oil, well, I run Fram filters and never had a problem with them - my point being that even though you have never had any problems with what you're using, there are reasons you shouldn't

You took a truck from a field, which probably had bearing clearances that were a mile wide in the first place, and ran straight weight oil - probably not a bad idea after sitting for 10 years - but for a new or freshly-rebuilt motor, there is a reason they make multi-weight oil.

I think one of the things everyone is forgetting is that using thicker oil to raise the oil pressure may actually hurt you - the oil pressure itself doesn't get you anything, it's the rate of flow, and how hot the oil gets. Running 5w30 might bring the temps down (because of the high rate of flow) where it's better than running 20w50 - but I wouldn't go that light in an FE
 
  #32  
Old 12-07-2004, 05:33 PM
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Originally Posted by EgoMan
Multi weight oil is garbage... strait 30 or 50 is all you need unless it get's very cold where your at, then its handy to have multi for easy start ups. Just my opinion.
I'm not sure how you can call multi-weight engine oil "garbage" but then later say it's "handy". Lots of people run vehicles to 200,000 miles and more on multi-weight with no problems. Do you know something others don't? To suggest that multi-weight oil has no advantages is just plain silly.
 
  #33  
Old 12-07-2004, 07:30 PM
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i run 5w30 amsoil synthetic in mine with a wix filter and have the same oil pressure at startup as i do at hot run 60-65lbs, and yea i'm pretty sure the gauge is workin?...best dang stuff i've ever seen ha ha. but then again i run the amsoil 2stroke premix in my dirtbike at 100:1 and havent re-ringed in 2 years.
 

Last edited by 754x4fordman; 12-07-2004 at 07:38 PM.
  #34  
Old 12-07-2004, 11:46 PM
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30w chevron works best for me.I also like chevron delo 400 15w40 best oil around.
 
  #35  
Old 12-07-2004, 11:59 PM
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Originally Posted by krewat
5W20 is being used in the Ford modular because Ford REQUIRES it. And even then, some of us use 5w30 instead. The modular motors are built with different clearances then the FE's, and with over-head cams, you need thin oil to get up to the top of the heads as quick as possible on start-up.

The problem with very heavy-weight oils, for example, 20w50, is that the spread between the cold and hot viscosities is hard to do, and they use paraffin or other additivies to make up the difference. These additives break down sooner, so thicker oil seems to break down quicker - all it's doing is loosing it's 50w hot viscosity. But seriously, I never had Castrol 20w50 break down in my FE's to the point of noticing an oil pressure drop.
I agree krewat. However, I was under the impression that 5w20 oil also had special properties over and beyond just the thickness in comparison to a 5w30 oil.

Just a quick point: I did not mean to suggest using a 5w20 oil in a FE...so just as long as I make myself clear. Would not be a good "practice".

 
  #36  
Old 12-08-2004, 09:12 AM
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I'm having to change. I run 20W50 but I think it's a little too thick now that the lows are in the 50's. I think I'm going to drop some light weight oil in there to loosen it up a little.
 
  #37  
Old 12-08-2004, 10:43 AM
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I'm not sure how you can call multi-weight engine oil "garbage" but then later say it's "handy". Lots of people run vehicles to 200,000 miles and more on multi-weight with no problems. Do you know something others don't? To suggest that multi-weight oil has no advantages is just plain silly.<!-- / message -->
Well I dont think its "handy"I do think its "garbage" and I dont see any advantage to it will old motors new motors may be made differently I dont know. I understand the concept of multi weight oil but there is NO proof that its any better......correction If i was running a 4 cylinder and it was cold I can see it might be hard to start first thing in the morning Then again in my FE I got tired of swapping to 30wt for the winter and just ran so i just kept running 50wt year round even when it was 9 degrees out side never had a slow start. So take it for what its worth but last time i checked I was entitled to my own opinion.
 
  #38  
Old 12-08-2004, 04:32 PM
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The original owner used 10w40 ,so I stuck with it.
 
  #39  
Old 12-08-2004, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by biz4two
I agree krewat. However, I was under the impression that 5w20 oil also had special properties over and beyond just the thickness in comparison to a 5w30 oil.

Just a quick point: I did not mean to suggest using a 5w20 oil in a FE...so just as long as I make myself clear. Would not be a good "practice".

From what I have read here (and other places) Ford's 5w20 is "semi-synth" - but I think it's that way because it's so thin that it needs to be somewhat synthetic to keep the wear down. But that's an opinion... Ford said something about emissions and MPG - not motor wear - some dealers have used the 5w20 spec to back out of warranty claims, but I see absolutely no difference between my '01 V10 and the '96/97 4.6L's in the driveway that specify 5w30 dino.

For EgoMan, sheesh, 50wt at 9 degrees? If that thing turns over at all, I'd start wondering why it turns over, something's gotta be loose Everything I've ever put 20w50 in cranks slow when it's below freezing... my 390 would tick on startup with anti-pump lifters and 20w50. But then, that might be re-inforcing your argument, because even the multi-weight 20w50 that's "supposed" to be 20w at low temps cranks slow like it would with straight 50w. Hmm... something more to think about ...
 
  #40  
Old 12-09-2004, 12:30 PM
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Well if I had to guess id say that because the 360 has low Compression it helped with that but It also had a brand new starterfrom oreily auto and that thing was a torque monster. But thats why i was so surprised because i was running 30wt in the winters and I changed my oil right before the tempsdropped one year and i didnt want to rechange my oil and go back to 30 so i left it and I didnt run into any real problems. Thats what I base my opinion on...but if i hadmore CR and bigger crank assembly Itwould probobly have been a bigger problem. Mostly all im getting at was that Ive never "needed" multi weight oil and it seems to go bad faster.
 
  #41  
Old 12-16-2004, 06:41 AM
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Originally Posted by fordman428
10w40 summer 10w30 winter.
I agree with you all the way fordman! That's the exact weights of oil my machine shop told me to use during those seasons. He told me to use Valvoline because it is the best. He also told me not to run 20w-50 in any engine due to the fact that its so thick that it won't keep the lifters primed correctly, leading to valvetrain problems.
 
  #42  
Old 12-16-2004, 08:44 AM
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I have heard that 10-40 is an unstable oil and shouldnt be used, any thruth to this? Also, I will be running mobil delvac full synethetic in my 352FE once it is broke in, its a disel rated syn, hard to beat that.
 
  #43  
Old 12-16-2004, 10:09 AM
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When the high and low viscosity numbers are too far apart, they need to add things that break down quickly... but even still, a good brand-name 10w40 won't break down before 3K miles.

Same for 20w50.

I've run 20w50 in my FE's in the summer for 20 years, (until I recently junked the '74), and never had a lifter problem - I would imagine it would be a problem for newer OHC engines though. But as soon as the outside temp got below 45, those lifters would make noise with 20w50 on startup
 
  #44  
Old 12-16-2004, 02:18 PM
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The only lifter problem I ever had with an FE engine was I flattened a cam on start up after a rebuild. Other than that never any other problem. The way the oil feeds in the FE's says if the lifters have an oil problem the mains have a bigger one.
 
  #45  
Old 12-16-2004, 07:40 PM
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My Automotive Instructor at college runs 10W30 Castrol in his vehicles except for his wife's car (5W30). He said he used to run Valvoline all the time and thought it was a good oil. He said he used to just run 30 wt. in the summer and 10W30 in the winter and cooler seasons. Eastern Montana can't get as cold as you ever want to see. It gets down into the -20 degrees F. regularly in the winter and then with a wind chill brrrrrr. I have heard of it getting down to as low as -45. He told me when I was a Freshman (last year) that a lot of guys that are his age or around his age (41) are just finally starting to use 10W40 again. Apparently quite a few years ago 10W40 would crap out and would just be 10 wt. all the time and that scared quite a few people back then and they wouldn't use it. He has a friend that has a dad that runs SAE 10wt year around on his farm and has stuff last forever so you be the judge. I just check my oil frequently (level, color, condition) watch my oil p.s.i. gauge and coolant temp guage religiously and go from there. If I ever overheat my engine, (which I did once this summer) I change the oil a.s.a.p. I got mine to a little past 260 degrees this summer with 20W50 Valvoline (conventional) and it made the oil get a little darker. Luckily I caught the guage moving quickly at 260 and shut her down and then damn near had a nervous breakdown. The night before that, me and my cousin were driving it with the speedo needle well past the 100mph mark and it threw the p.s. belt off. The next day I was headed to my now ex-girlfriend's parents house to smooth over an argument we had and I was hungover and wasn't really paying attention to the gauges that often. It was a hot summer day (90 degrees if I recall) and I started to smell something like boiling antifreeze while I was cruising at about 25 mph on the gravel road. I looked down to see the guage steadily rising and just go past 260. I shut it off immediately, waited about 20 min. and put the remaining 2 belts back on (alt, and A.C.) then started it when it was at about 225 and it started cooling down immediately with the belts on. I know this is getting long, but what happend was I had replaced the water pump about a week and a half before this event and it worked fine for a few days and then my engine started throwing belts. Remanufactured NAPA pump had a shaft that had a wobble. When I got it home that afternoon the front bearing on the pump had came half way out. Replaced it with another reman. and haven't had a problem since (knock on wood). I run 10W40 in my pickup most of the time and haven't had a problem. Instructor said that the oil companies fixed the issue with 10W40 "years ago" but a lot of people just had a hard time believing it. Keep an eye on you p.s.i. guage, temp guage, and check your oil once in a while and you should be fine. With relatively tight bearing clearances and it's current stock replacement oil pump my 401 seems to like 10W40 better (for pressure anyway). My pressure with 10W30 is adequate but somewhat lower with it and the higher readings with 10W40 just give me more peace of mind I guess.
 

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