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Winter Driving - Weight needed in bed?

 
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Old 06-09-2019, 07:27 PM
Arctic033
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Winter Driving - Weight needed in bed?

Granted it's the start of summer but as I organize the garage and shed I keep moving 3 bags of sand at 70 lbs each. I use these in winter for the back of the F150. I'm not sure if they do any good or not as I put them in late fall and take them out in April.

Question - I purchased a F250 supercab. Since it's a larger and heavier truck is weight still needed? If so will 210 lbs even make a difference? If not I will dispose of the sand bags and get back some storage area.

I will add that both trucks are 4wd and I'm in southern WI so we see our fair share of snow.
 
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Old 06-09-2019, 07:29 PM
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Whatís wrong with just using 4WD?
 
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Old 06-09-2019, 08:03 PM
Arctic033
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I use 4wd when needed but isnít always required. Maybe that is the answer though. Forget the sand and if the rear breaks loose then use 4wd then
 
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Old 06-09-2019, 08:06 PM
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I have 4 50 lb bags for mine. I use 4WD more in my 250 than I did in my 150. The added power and weight in the front results in more tire spin for me.

Truck weighs more yes, but that weight isnít all over the rear axle so itís actually more of a hindrance, especially from a stop. Iíve got the diesel, so thatís even more weight to get moving.

I use the 4WD when I need to, and all the weight up front means traction is never an issue once I am in 4WD. However, I find the rear end to be too light if the roads are the least bit slippery. Even certain hills with stops at the top I routinely break the tires loose when the road is wet from rain.

I donít like shifting in an out of 4WD at every other intersection, and I donít like having 4WD engaged on dry-ish roads, especially when turning, so adding some weight over the axel is a good move in my opinion. Especially since the factory all season tires are just average at best in the winter.
 
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Old 06-09-2019, 08:17 PM
Arctic033
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Originally Posted by VA13FX4 View Post
I have 4 50 lb bags for mine. I use 4WD more in my 250 than I did in my 150. The added power and weight in the front results in more tire spin for me.

Truck weighs more yes, but that weight isnít all over the rear axle so itís actually more of a hindrance, especially from a stop. Iíve got the diesel, so thatís even more weight to get moving.

I use the 4WD when I need to, and all the weight up front means traction is never an issue once I am in 4WD. However, I find the rear end to be too light if the roads are the least bit slippery. Even certain hills with stops at the top I routinely break the tires loose when the road is wet from rain.

I donít like shifting in an out of 4WD at every other intersection, and I donít like having 4WD engaged on dry-ish roads, especially when turning, so adding some weight over the axel is a good move in my opinion. Especially since the factory all season tires are just average at best in the winter.

Thank you for the detailed write up. That is the entire reason I use them in the f150. That extra bit over the axle to help keep traction.
 
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Old 06-09-2019, 08:24 PM
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More weight is just more that slides when braking. Your truck has 4wd use it. Don't add weight in the back not needed at all
 
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Old 06-09-2019, 08:26 PM
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I'm in Edmonton I keep 1500 lbs in box in winter to avoid using 4x4 and the weight smooths out the ride, driving on rutty ice can get rough
 
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Old 06-09-2019, 08:37 PM
Arctic033
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Originally Posted by Boasty View Post
More weight is just more that slides when braking. Your truck has 4wd use it. Don't add weight in the back not needed at all
Iíve never had it slide around. I add 2x4 braces that prevent it from sliding forward so itís always over the axles.

Nothing stops it from sliding backwards and itís never moved.
 
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Old 06-09-2019, 08:50 PM
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More weight equals more inertia when you do start to slide. Get yourself some good winter rated goodyear duratracs.
 
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Old 06-09-2019, 08:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Arctic033 View Post
Iíve never had it slide around. I add 2x4 braces that prevent it from sliding forward so itís always over the axles.

Nothing stops it from sliding backwards and itís never moved.
Yup! 2x4s are sitting with the bags in the garage. Iíve never had the sandbags slide anywhere.

My morning commute takes me through 4 towns and some country roads. Around 20 intersections with stop signs or stop lights. Iím normally at work by 7am and itís hit or miss as to what the roads will be like at that time of morning if it snowed the night before. The added weight over the axel results in me having to shift into 4WD a lot less, even on the hills. Now if the roads are not cleared at all, I will most definitely roll through town and down the highway in 4WD.

This was my first real winter in several years and the first winter with this truck. I initially thought the overall weight of the truck would mean it would be a tank in the snow. Not so much! In 4WD itís pretty unstoppable, but the tires break loose a lot from a stop in 2WD. Granted, some of the issue was me relearning winter driving and getting used to the truck, but even after I got in the groove of things I still had issues on hills with tire spin. Yes, it only takes a second to go into 4WD, but if I can accelerate from a stop 99% of the time without shifting into 4WD, Iíd rather do that. I also have the electronic locker, so as soon as there is any loss of traction I just pop that on and Iím good to go most of the time.
 
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Old 06-09-2019, 09:28 PM
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Originally Posted by ap48379 View Post
More weight equals more inertia when you do start to slide. Get yourself some good winter rated goodyear duratracs.
^^^^^^^^^^. This is good advice. I was never a duratrac fan but a buddy talked me into them. I got them studded due to the crazy ice roads I drive in the winter. I canít believe Iíve never used a studded tire before and I will never go without them again. Had to drive 350km on sheer ice on a trip to and from work a few times, If I didnít have the studs, I would have been all over the place like every other truck I saw going 40km/hr. Obviously a studded winter tire isnít a good option for a guy in Texas but their great for us Prairie Canucks north of the border.
 
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Old 06-09-2019, 10:18 PM
AlphaInfinity
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All,

Unless you have a headache rack or a locking toolbox in the back of your truck, I would suggest NOT putting anything in the bed of the truck for weight.

Consult your local fire department or state troopers and ask them what happens when an unsecured sandbag goes through the back window of a truck if a wreck were to occur.
 
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Old 06-09-2019, 10:33 PM
Alloy
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I find that weight in the back keep the rear end from sliding around...more the better.

The tires are glued to the road when we tow the 5th in the winter. We pulled it through 10" of snow into a site 2 years ago. Our friends with bumper pull trailer needed chains on the rear wheels to get in.

edit: we are running K02s
 
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Old 06-09-2019, 10:44 PM
Boasty
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Originally Posted by Arctic033 View Post
Iíve never had it slide around. I add 2x4 braces that prevent it from sliding forward so itís always over the axles.

Nothing stops it from sliding backwards and itís never moved.

Im not talking about the sandbags sliding. I'm talking about the truck. You add weight in rear of truck you start braking in the Icey roads and when you start to slide your extra sand weight is doing you more bad then good. Again as I said your truck has 4wd use it don't add weight
 
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Old 06-09-2019, 10:55 PM
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A full tank of fuel is 320lbs.

my spare tire is another 120lbs

truck cap is 200lbs

640lbs is plenty of weight
 

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