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1987 - 1996 F150 & Larger F-Series Trucks 1987 - 1996 Ford F-150, F-250, F-350 and larger pickups - including the 1997 heavy-duty F250/F350+ trucks

89 F-350 Clutch Issue

 
  #1  
Old 05-14-2019, 06:35 PM
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89 F-350 Clutch Issue

Greetings all! New member and glad to be here

A few weeks ago I picked up an 89 F-350 which was converted from AT to MT. When I read the ad, I assumed ZF 5-sp which I thought was the only manual option available that year but when I went down to drive it, discovered the PO put a T-19 in there. Perfect for what this truck is for... so I bought it. The clutch worked fine at first but all of the action was in the very bottom of the stroke. Then after a couple weeks the pedal started sticking to the floor momentarily and eventually got to the point where I couldn't get it in gear at all. I went ahead and replaced the master and slave cylinder along with the pushrod bushing. This fixed the sticking issue and it feels like a normal clutch now but still won't disengage enough to even get into gear.

Here's the thing... in the process of replacing the master cylinder, I noticed that the cross shaft lever is completely fabricated... literally just a chunk of steel with a pin welded on it. Nice :| So, seeing as how I don't know what the pedal assembly in here came out of, I'm having trouble knowing exactly which lever to order. All this has me wanting to just buy a new OEM pedal assembly but now I can't find one for '89 but lots for '92 and up.

I know it's not a direct fit but how much work would it be to adapt a pedal assembly from '92 to fit in an '89? I see there are studs for the master cylinder instead of bolt holes but besides this what issues am going to run in to. Anybody ever tried this before?

Is there anything else I should be looking at? Maybe there's still air in there from replacing the hydraulics?

Thanks! Glad to be a part of FTE!
 
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Old 05-15-2019, 08:38 AM
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Using the '92-up pedal assembly is a no-go, they are not even close. I recommend you find the proper pedal assembly from a junkyard or on eBay. Even if it is worn, at least you will have the proper starting point.
 
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Old 05-15-2019, 01:33 PM
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Good to know. Thanks!

I'll probably just pull this one out and try to rebuild first it if the aluminum isn't worn away. Steering column needs an overhaul too anyways.

Is it just me or is there a serious shortage of parts available for these late 80s trucks? I know it's 30 years old but I see a ton of them on the road still...
 
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Old 05-15-2019, 06:49 PM
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Went digging a little more this afternoon and realized the end of the cross shaft in the pedal assembly is different than what I've been seeing online. It has a tab on the end instead of the teeth. After a little more research, I'm convinced the pedals are out of an 84-86 truck. This would explain the 4 speed and why the steering column isn't aligned right. Good times!

My question now is this... if I buy the correct assembly used off e-bay, what should I replace before I put it all back together?
 
 


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