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1948 - 1956 F1, F100 & Larger F-Series Trucks Discuss the Fat Fendered and Classic Ford Trucks

Odd, older custom features on a ‘52 F2

 
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Old 04-18-2019, 01:05 AM
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Odd, older custom features on a ‘52 F2

First off, I have no $ interest in this truck, only curiosity interest. It’s for sale on eBay and I think it’s located somewhere on the high plains (Wyoming, I believe). It has some unusual, older custom features and the photo representation includes a curious kitty. It apparently has a Y-block 272 or 292 engine from the seller’s description of a crossover manifold. (With the crossover feeding the right bank manifold, why there are two exhaust outlets in the custom bumper?)

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F312573132454
 
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Old 04-18-2019, 12:32 PM
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Apparently, the owner never wanted to run low on fuel. So many questions on this one.
 
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Old 04-18-2019, 12:47 PM
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I don't see a filler cap on that "tank", that would be a really, really bad place for an aux tank.

Ford did list a complete changeover kit to put Y-blocks in earlier trucks, I've never seen a truck so converted.

 
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Old 04-18-2019, 12:49 PM
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Fuel?

Originally Posted by FortyNiner View Post
Apparently, the owner never wanted to run low on fuel. So many questions on this one.
So those big box things on the back are fuel tanks? I thought possibly tool storage, but on looking again I don’t see either hinged lids or filler cap / necks. With the lights installed, it made me think it was an attempt to create a utility bed. - If those boxes were for fuel, that would be lots of fuel and very exposed in a rear end collision.
 
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Old 04-18-2019, 01:06 PM
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These boxes in the rear of the bed are hollow and open towards the bed, sort of extensions?

I would get the angle grinder and undo it all......
 
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Old 04-18-2019, 01:50 PM
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There's a large tank in the bed. I'm clueless on the purpose of the boxes by the tailgate.
 
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Old 04-18-2019, 03:08 PM
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Those "boxes" are open to the bed. An early attempt at creating a utility body. Also, the storage box on the left front fender is a nice touch. The lights appear to be mounted in a separate plate behind the boxes.
That is the first 1/2 ton pickup I've seen with a full floating rear axle and eight lug wheels. Hmm.
 
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Old 04-18-2019, 03:29 PM
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He calls it a 1/2-ton but it's an F-2, at least according to the hood, but the serial number may show it to be an F-3. It appears to have at least two WM's.
 
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Old 04-18-2019, 04:28 PM
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Originally Posted by FortyNiner View Post
There's a large tank in the bed. I'm clueless on the purpose of the boxes by the tailgate.
Now I see the fuel tank. In the photos with portrait orientation it was obscured. I looked again and zoomed in on the ‘sideways’ picture. Someone cut a hole in the right front side of the bed box for a filler neck. Perhaps this was a setup for transferring fuel to field tractors on a farm. - That reminds me of a story . . . . .. . . . Warning, now going a bit off topic.

Having graduated from college after summer term of ‘73, it was too late to find a teaching position. Feeling dejected at being unemployed (except as a door-to-door sweeper salesperson - awful job), I agreed to urging from a college buddy to do a Florida spring break trip to escape the cold and the snow of Indiana.

My dad had a ‘71 Ford F250 that we used on our small farm and for his daily driver to and from his job at a coal mine. I borrowed the truck from dad and left him my ‘70 Nova for the drive to work. We also borrowed a heavy gage farm field tank from a neighbor and loaded it with 200 gallons of fuel. A small, vented canopy (bed cap) was fitted with window curtains made from old pillow cases, thanks to my mom. - We had read about and had seen on TV the long lines for gas in Florida. So we were off for a Florida spring break adventure with enough fuel for several fill ups if we could not get gas.

By Chance, we ended up in a beautiful place that I had not heard of with beautiful, unspoiled beaches. It was Sanibel Island. A causeway bridge had been built about a year earlier, so development was soon to follow. We saw that some people had been driving off road out near the beaches, so we tried to drive there too. After a half mile of easy driving and following tracks made by others, we came to dip in the tracks. On trying to traverse the ‘dip,’ we sank to the axles in the soft, dry, sand. We’re were very stuck. We would dig by hand and raise the truck with a jack, but would only move a couple of feet only to sink again in the sand. Two disheveled looking fellows and a girl emerged from the bushes and offered some help. They said that the same thing had happened in that spot a few weeks earlier. They scoured the beach area for a bit and returned with some boards and some plywood to help was get the pickup up and across the soft spot. By then it was nearing late afternoon and they invited us to their “camp” farther down the beach where they had some food they were willing to share.

On joining them at their “camp” we saw that they were staying in a rough, old, mid-fifty’s panel truck. They had come to Florida on spring break from some college in Ohio . . . more than a year earlier. They had camped so long that their old truck wouldn’t run (dead battery) and they had used all the fuel from the truck for starting their camp fires. They said it had been fun for a year, but they were ready to leave but could not get their old panel van going. (I think it was about a ‘55 Ford panel truck.) They had been doing work for the some owners of a few of the nice homes on the island and collecting canned foods in return. Apparently there was a public shower by the causeway bridge that they were able to use from time to time. We offered to charge / jump their battery from out truck to help them get going, but they thought it would not be possible by having no gasoline and they knew that the gas shortage / rationing would make it difficult to get fuel from the main land. They felt certain that their time on the island was limited and they would soon be evicted by the authorities. In the past few weeks they had been pulling up survey stakes for fire wood and they knew that would not be tolerated much longer.

We got their battery to take a charge with cables and we told them that next morning we would siphon some gas from our tank to try to get their truck going. We did not reveal that we had 200+ gallons on board, thinking it best not to make this known in the midst of local shortages.

Next morning we tried to get their truck going. We primed their engine and we put a gallon or so in their tank from a gas can we had. There engine sputtered, coughed, fired and ran rough making a fog of smoke only to die after a few seconds on each attempt. We pulled and cleaned the plugs that were badly oil fouled. We cleaned a fuel filter and a carburetor bowl of varnish and sand grit and on subsequent attempts got it to continue to run. They still thought they had a problem of securing enough fuel to leave the island. They were shocked when we pulled a pump hose from the farm tank and started to fill their tank. Eventually, we followed them off the beach and off the island in a cloud of smoke that trailed from their vehicle. They had told us that on traveling to the island more than a year earlier that they were having to stop every fifty miles or so to “check the gas and fill it up - with oil” to keep it going.

Sanibel Island was a beautiful place and I have never been back, but others have told me that the location of our adventure is now heavily developed with luxury condos lining the beaches except for an area on the north end of the island where there was a wildlife sanctuary.

We traveled on across “alligator alley” and eventually stopped for a visit with an older relative of my buddie’s somewhere in a suburb of Miami. On checking in with my folks back home, my mother had been desperate to get a call from us. She was elated to tell me that she had taken a call for me from the Air Force and that I was being asked to come for an interview for a teaching position at Chanute AFB in Rantoul, Illinois. We made a quick trip back to Indiana and I made Rantoul in time for the interview. Although my teacher’s license in Indiana was for Secondary Social Studies (Psychology - Sociology & World History), I started my career as a Civil Service Technical Training Instructor teaching Air Force recruits to become crew chief mechanics on B-52, KC-135, C-141, and C-5 aircraft. That was a great job that I really enjoyed for about five years until there was DoD downsizing following the Vietnam Nam era. The air base at Chanute was eventually closed and I became teacher in the Indiana public schools teaching Computer Science and Social Studies.
 
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Old 04-19-2019, 07:42 AM
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That's a great story! Thanks for sharing it with us. I was around during the "gas crisis", but don't really recall it having much of an affect on me personally. I can relate to an old Ford panel truck needing lots of oil, however.

Jim
 
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Old 04-19-2019, 12:01 PM
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Sure is an interesting truck modifications. With all that added metal I would say it has to be either an F-2 or F-3. Hard to tell if it has a WM or not, if it has WMs then it's probably is an F-3, F-2 came with one piece rims.

Just everyone know what were talking about:

Here is the story on this truck...Old man in California bought this truck new, was one owner, He loved this truck and took very good care of it. He died, and left it to his brother in Wyoming. His brother drove truck home from California to Wyoming. It sat in feild for 10 years. I bought it last year. Engine is not froze up, but will need tlc to get running. Truck is 1952, but engine is the newer V*8 from 1953. Not sure if it was a option or installed later. looks factory, not hacked up.He gave me stack of paper work, death certificate, bill of sale and tax registration, looks to be in order to get title. I have many projects, so selling to finish others i have.Truck has hardly any rust. on scale of 1 -10 , 10 being 100% rust free, i would rate truck a 8 or a 9. Original truck owner was custom metal worker, so he fabricated custom bumper with exhaust outlet holes, dual battery boxes on each front fender, Truck does have front drivers side fender damage. everything else is good.Truck is 8 hole lugs. engine is 1953 v8, the one with the cross over exhaust pipe in front.








 
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Old 04-19-2019, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by TitusDH View Post
These boxes in the rear of the bed are hollow and open towards the bed, sort of extensions?

I would get the angle grinder and undo it all......
I Think I'd leave all of the modifications on the truck. If the original owner did all of the modifications when he first got it new then it would be vintage correct modifications and I think add history to the truck. I don't really like the modifications because I think it messes up the style of the truck but I also like them because they do tell a story about the truck and it's uses.

I would however clean it up and give it a nice coat of paint, I don't like the "patina" fad.
 
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Old 04-19-2019, 12:10 PM
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The Stout metal in the rear might have been originally to brace the bed sides.
 
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Old 04-19-2019, 05:14 PM
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Interesting story about Sanibel Island. We Lee County FL locals call that dry loose sand "Sugar Sand". The idea of camping on Sanibel for a year in an old panel truck is funny.
You can't camp over night on Sanibel unless you are in the 1 and only camp ground there $58. per day. The land is so expensive that only the very rich can afford to live there. There is 1 fast food restaurant on the island Dairy Queen. When we go to the beach there it is only for the day.
 
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Old 04-20-2019, 12:18 AM
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Looks like a farm version of the Family Truckster from the movie Vacation.
 
 


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