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2003 Oil Leak.

 
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Old 03-13-2019, 06:49 PM
Shelstin
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2003 Oil Leak.

I am not a mechanic by any means. I received a lot of good info here about a year ago. I bought a 2003 6.0 last January. Totally stock with 75k. The truck is a beast and has been perfect, and even though it is much more truck than I need, it's nice to have the power when I want it. It's developed a pretty good oil leak. I called the closest diesel shop about an hour away and described the location, and without looking at it, said that it was probably an oil pressure sensor. The cab would need to be pulled and I might as well bullit proof it while he was there. I didn't like the answer. I took it to my regular mechanic, and he doesn't feel comfortable working on a diesel. He recommend a guy that was a Ford diesel tech before he took another job and still does work on the side. I know him and gave him a call, and he came by the house. he looked things over, and said that it was almost certainly the oil pressure sensor on the back of the engine. It's tight but he can get to it. It will be a few weeks before he has time, but I can live with that. He said on the newer engines the sensor is on top and simple to get to. I hope that this all makes sense. My question...is there anything else I should consider having done while he is at it? EGR delete?
 
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Old 03-13-2019, 07:34 PM
tfunk88
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I thought the oil pressure sensor was on the oil cooler cover?

Unless they are talking about the injection control pressure sensor, which I think on a 2003 is on the HPOP cover under/behind the turbo. On later engines itís on the passenger valve cover. But that shouldnít require cab removal.

Maybe thereís another one I donít know about on the back of the engine, but...

Iíd definitely do an egr delete, but thatís me
 
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Old 03-13-2019, 10:26 PM
Shelstin
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Chances are, I misunderstood what the sensor was. I would bet on your knowledge over mine in this situation. He did say it was by the turbo, and located "up here" on the newer models, pointing at that area. Thanks!
 
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Old 03-13-2019, 11:03 PM
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I would guess the ICP sensor also. Several good youtube videos on how to change it out (and probably need a new sensor pigtail while you are at it). The cab certainly does not need to be pulled. I also think that "bulletproofing" it is a separate decision. Much more work is involved in that (assuming you mean an EGR delete and head studs).
 
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Old 03-13-2019, 11:59 PM
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im with Mark theyre probably talking about the Injector Control Pressure sensor... on the 2003 and early 2004's it sits under where the up pipes connect to the turbo... you dont need to pull the cab to do it... you can do it cab on.. its just a tight fit to get in there... on the MY 2004 and later they moved the sensor to the passenger side valve cover... a deep socket, universal and an extension is all you need to change it... (small hands will help too)...

one piece of advice many of us give though if you change it yourself is to change it with the later sensor instead of the early sensor... most shops wont do this (especially FORD dealerships) because they told to replace it with the correct year sensor... problem is the early ones are known for going bad.. no ones sure if its the heat or the pressure that causes the 03/early 04's to crack and spray oil all over the place.... but the later 04 ICP sensor seems to hold up better under the pressures... it seems like its built more robust as failures seem to be unheard of when theyre swapped into the earlier location...

im with mark as well on the bulletproofing.. dont let the tech threads scare you into doing work that doesnt need done.. wait till you have to dig into the engine before you start just ripping the engine apart to change things... too many people just tear into things because some thread said to when its really not needed...
 
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Old 03-14-2019, 06:02 AM
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The ICP is a simple swap on my '03 as long as the engine is cold and you have the correct socket and extension combination. I am on my 4th and hopefully last as I went with the later style the last time. The previous one developed the same leak as the op. I go in from the bottom but I have pulled it from the top if the degas tank is out. I didn't change the pig tail, just flushed it with contact cleaner then treated with Deoxit, it's been fine for over a year.

The biggest problem with the 6.0 is finding someone that knows how to work on them if you can't do the work yourself.

As for what else to do to the truck, get a monitor to watch the temps and pressures, maintain the cooling system and get rid of the egr cooler.
 
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Old 03-14-2019, 06:50 PM
Shelstin
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I appreciate you guys and your willingness to take some time and explain things to a diesel newbie like me. I have had a few hard starts at work in the cold...never at home. It's always garaged at the house, and never gets below freezing. It's always started, but it may crank for 10-15 seconds combined on a few attempts. I feel like it is when I get in a hurry and try to start it immediately when the glow plug light goes off. It seems like when I wait an extra few seconds it is not an issue. My mechanic thought that it might be a few bad glow plugs, and that it was really easy to check. Any other thoughts?
 
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Old 03-14-2019, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Shelstin View Post
I appreciate you guys and your willingness to take some time and explain things to a diesel newbie like me. I have had a few hard starts at work in the cold...never at home. It's always garaged at the house, and never gets below freezing. It's always started, but it may crank for 10-15 seconds combined on a few attempts. I feel like it is when I get in a hurry and try to start it immediately when the glow plug light goes off. It seems like when I wait an extra few seconds it is not an issue. My mechanic thought that it might be a few bad glow plugs, and that it was really easy to check. Any other thoughts?
we were all new at some point lol I use to work for a dealership in their service department and outside of an oil change on one hadnt touched a diesel.. my learning experience with diesels came when i bought my current truck.. boy was that a "fun" learning experience.. the biggest advice everyone here will give you is to get something that can read the codes and monitor the various sensors on the truck as this engine is very computer controlled.. 1 little sensor can take it down in a heart beat.. and seeing the returns will greatly help you diagnose it.. especially if you can watch the live data instead of just looking for trouble codes... unfortunately only a few scanners can read diesels so most your off the shelf OBDII code readers wont work for this... Scan Gauge II, Torque Pro (phone App) few others you can find listed in the tech threads will help...

most times the garages will be warmer than when its sitting outside aiding in the quicker starts.. glow plugs could be playing an issue there... but i suspect that the ICP sensor is more likely the cause... the glow plugs do stay lit for another 30 sec after the dash light goes out... (some places ive read theyll cycle on and off till the engines up to operating temp but never been able to verify this...) but if your jumping in the truck at work and turning the key directly from off to Start... yeah youll definitely experience longer cranks till the plugs warm up.. bad bad on diesels to do that... need to learn patience there padawan lol... no matter how good your glow plugs are trying to start it like that will always result in a longer crank... Remember unlike gassers these engines dont ignite the fuel with a spark... the diesel fuel explodes under the combination of heat and compression in combination of the air and fuel... take any of those elements out of the equation and you wont get it to start... with gas your just substituting the heat for an electric spark.. but once that sparks gone the engine dies... with a diesel once its warmed up and theres sufficient heat in the cylinders the glow plugs are no longer needed and it becomes self sustaining..

i would say for right now... replace the ICP sensor and see if your starting problem cures itself... if not and its not a personal instigated starting problem (starting before the GP can heat up) youll need to get something to watch monitor the live data to see where the problem really is...
 
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Old 03-14-2019, 09:42 PM
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If I could sum up what you need to successfully own a 2003 F250 6.0, I would say that you need to know the numbers. So, how big is your oil leak and does it just present itself when you are parked or when you are running the engine? How high is the oil on your dipstick? One service manager tried to talk me into having the engine removed and having them look at the back plate. I read that if I lowered the oil level to slightly below full on the dipstick, this might cure the problem. It did.

With a Scan Gauge, about $150 these days, you should get some readings that will tell you if the ECT is broken. And doing the replacement is a pain but certainly doable. You will have to fabricate a special socket or you can buy one from Amazon - Williams BCF34 1-1/16-Inch Crowfoot Flare Nut for around $28.As to doing an EGR delete on this year truck, I have never figured out any tangible benefit plus there is the possible problem of failing inspection now or sometime later if they begin to check them in your state. Others have had situations where the removal throws an engine code. As to bullet proofing, I am never quite sure what that actually entails and if everything on your truck is OK now, leave it alone. Actually I think that bullet proofing is a state of mind.

Some things that you may want to consider are a Blue Spring Kit to raise your fuel pressure, a Fuel Pressure Gauge to monitor your fuel pressure, a Coolant Filter whether you use Ford Gold or some of the newer coolants, a Magnafine Inline Power Steering Filter and a 140 AMP upgrade for your alternator. I have posted about all these items and you can see them under my sig. Others have posted about them as well and have probably done a better job of explaining things.

These are high maintenance vehicles but I think if you do your own maintenance, you can save some money and learn about this rather complex vehicle. And learn to use the search feature on this site - there's lots of information in this forum. Good luck with your truck.
 
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Old 03-14-2019, 10:13 PM
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there is no special socket needed or one cut down as many suggested when i needed to do just to change that sensor... just a regular deep socket... universal... short extension and ratchet was all i needed... i did everything from the top half of the engine (which i got the early intake manifold that had the balance crossover run in the back)... hardest part was getting the sensor to break loose (thinking when the dealer did it the time before they put it in with an impact)... once it broke loose everything flew...

blue spring doesnt work for everyone... i had 3 of them all of which gave me problems.. (and im not the only one on that.. plenty on here have had the same problem with them)... original pressure spring lasted forever in the truck... once i had the blue spring done it was nothing but problems.. now i have a regulated return to get rid of the issues... i more agree with your statement if its working leave it alone... too many here suggest making changing just because it worked for them.. or scaring people into changing things that dont need changed... reason people suggest getting rid of the EGR cooler is "because they crack" or "they cook the coolant to the point the silicate crystallizes in the gold coolant" which then clogs the oil cooler... (part of why everyone recommends going to the Rotella ELC which is EC-1 compliant, Borate, silicate, nitrate and posphate free)... there are thousands of trucks running around out there completely stock running trouble free.. no upgraded alternator, no coolant filters... ect ect..

i ended up doing alot of things to mine simply because people told me i needed to do it to protect the trucks... looking back i wish i had left alot of things alone...
 
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Old 03-15-2019, 09:09 AM
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Thanks for the input!
 
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Old 03-17-2019, 10:53 AM
Shelstin
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I appreciate the advice. You guys are really knowledgeable and have huge amounts of experience, which I love to listen to. I may do an EGR delete, as the truck is 16 years old and has a whopping 85,000 miles.
I see Harley Guys and Diesel Guys pretty much the same. We buy extensively researched and tested engines, and try to change them. For example, I have a perfectly good 1998 HD EVO. Last year of the EVO engine. But a guy I ride with had rebuilt his, and was a little quicker. So I spent $4k on my engine, and made it faster. Now, it takes forever to warm up to idle, it fouls plugs like crazy, doesn't really ever sinc with the computer, pings when the temps get hot with anything less than 94 octane, gets less MPG than my Camaro SS at about 20-22. But it's fast when it's about 71.5 degrees out with perfect barometric pressure. I have to get fuel around every 100-120 miles which is half of what it should be. Did I say it was fast?
The guy that I bought my truck from said it was 100% factory stock, and not to "screw with it". He camped with a few other couples. Even though he had a bumper pull, his buddies would out pull him up the mountain grades, flip him off on the way by, then work on their trucks pretty much the whole time once they got there. He would sit in a lawn chair with an iced tea and watch. And yeah, some of you will recognize this scenario, I'm sure!
 
 


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