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New '19 f250 moves around while towing

 
  #16  
Old 03-07-2019, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Wotf8 View Post
Maybe 80 is too much in the truck tires also and is making it worse. I could try that, they are rated for 3750 pounds each at 80 psi, so that is 7500 pounds, almost the entire weight of the truck with just two tires. The front weighs 4750 with me in it, so I could easily run 65 psi.
​​​​​​​I'd leave the rears at 80 and run the frts at 65.
 
  #17  
Old 03-07-2019, 01:03 PM
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That's what I was thinking.
 
  #18  
Old 03-07-2019, 02:34 PM
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What type of hitch are you using?

Also could you define moving around? More like when and how?

 
  #19  
Old 03-07-2019, 04:37 PM
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It is a curt hitch on rails. It "meanders", best I can describe it. Have to make small corrections to keep it in a lane. Which is normal right, but I am comparing it to the ram I had and it drove "straighter", with no trailer they both drive fine, the Ford does have a smoother ride overall. Also, like I mentioned above, when someone is passing you the air pressure change around the truck makes you have to correct the steering enough, like say driving over uneven pavement with extra wide tires, if you get what I am saying. Just more than I am use too. I really think it is in the tires. That is what makes the most sense to me.
 
  #20  
Old 03-07-2019, 05:04 PM
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If you had a travel trailer I would say that you have lost too much weight from the front axle. From your picture it looks fairly level so I wouldn't expect weight loss from the front axle, but looks can be deceiving. A trip to the scale is in order.

The high PSI on your front tires could be part of the problem. Even on my F-350 the fronts are set to 60, not 80. Only the rear tires go to 80.
 
  #21  
Old 03-07-2019, 05:06 PM
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Sounds like wagging the tail. More trailer than truck but your previous Ram handled it fine. Wierd.
 
  #22  
Old 03-07-2019, 05:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Wotf8 View Post
It is a curt hitch on rails. It "meanders", best I can describe it. Have to make small corrections to keep it in a lane. Which is normal right, but I am comparing it to the ram I had and it drove "straighter", with no trailer they both drive fine, the Ford does have a smoother ride overall. Also, like I mentioned above, when someone is passing you the air pressure change around the truck makes you have to correct the steering enough, like say driving over uneven pavement with extra wide tires, if you get what I am saying. Just more than I am use too. I really think it is in the tires. That is what makes the most sense to me.
I think its the truck suspension. The newer Fords are trying to get the rides as comfortable as possible that they are getting softer in the rear. The old school trucks road like a log truck unless you had some weight on the rear. But some $300 air bags and be done. It will firm up your load when pulling and wont hurt the ride quality when unloaded.
 
  #23  
Old 03-07-2019, 06:53 PM
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I did weigh it, front axle is 600 pounds less than the rear.
 
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Old 03-07-2019, 07:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Wotf8 View Post
It is a curt hitch on rails
When you say Curt hitch on rails, are you referring to a slider? If so, do you have the hitch in the forward position?
 
  #25  
Old 03-07-2019, 08:13 PM
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Not a slider.
 
  #26  
Old 03-07-2019, 09:35 PM
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I kinda doubt it's the truck's suspension unless there is a defect...possible but not probable.

Could be tire related. We have a 2wd and I run aggressive tires on the back. I had a set that had soft tread that resulted in a scary ride...camper pushed back of truck side to side.

Could be the road. Roads grooved from heavy truck traffic will make a fiver sway.

Could be gusty wind.

Could be a whacky weight imbalance on the camper though that generally is more of a travel trailer concern.

With the exception of the soft tread tires, deep grooved road, and gusty (50 mph+) wind scenarios, our 10,000 lb fiver is steady and comfortable to tow with either our 2002 or our 1965 3/4 ton pickups. Believe it or not, the '65 pulls it nicely at interstate speeds which makes me think you have a definite mystery.
 
  #27  
Old 03-07-2019, 09:51 PM
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Tail wagging from a fiver... not likely unless high cross winds or really low pin weight. Low pin weight causes this not high.

Pin weight...not anything out of ordinary for a 250...under axel limit.

Slight pull from passing semi trucks is normal cars not so much.

Are you towing with the tanks full of water?

Hows the truck drive with similar weight in the back, but no trailer? How about empty? Does it pull on its own?

Hows the wear on your front drive tires? Are you seeing feathering and or cupping?
 
  #28  
Old 03-08-2019, 05:55 AM
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I have the Goodyear 18" E rated wranglers, and my towing is rock solid, no matter what PSI, even double towing I'd suspect the tires..
 
  #29  
Old 03-08-2019, 07:30 AM
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OP, are your trailer axles straight (any odd wear on trailer tires). That could cause slight sway and transferring to the tow vehicle. Just a thought.
 
  #30  
Old 03-08-2019, 08:10 AM
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Originally Posted by superrangerman2002 View Post
Tail wagging from a fiver... not likely unless high cross winds or really low pin weight. Low pin weight causes this not high.

Pin weight...not anything out of ordinary for a 250...under axel limit.

Slight pull from passing semi trucks is normal cars not so much.

Are you towing with the tanks full of water?

Hows the truck drive with similar weight in the back, but no trailer? How about empty? Does it pull on its own?

Hows the wear on your front drive tires? Are you seeing feathering and or cupping?
The truck is brand new, as in I only drove it about 200 miles before hooking the trailer on. So I haven't done anything else with it. Wasn't even planning on buying a ford, but the had rust starting on the cab floor of the ram, so I figured now was the best time to trade it off.
The tanks were completely empty and the truck and trailer tires look perfect. I am going to try 60 or 65 in the fronts and see what that is like for the way home. To me it sounds backwards to think less pressure is going to improve things, but have to try the simple easy stuff first.
 

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