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3525 lbs/tire (load range D) - is that enough for a F350?

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3525 lbs/tire (load range D) - is that enough for a F350?

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Old 08-16-2018, 11:22 AM
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3525 lbs/tire (load range D) - is that enough for a F350?

I was planning on installing 37x13.5x18 on my truck when it arrives. I thought the load rating was 3970/tire per one website, but after looking at Toyo’s site they are Ds and not Es as I thought.

We curently only have a TT so bumper pull and not much cargo need. We might consider a 5er in th future, but by then we’d probabty be looking at new tires or new truck.

Issues?
 
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Old 08-16-2018, 11:42 AM
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No way. You need an E rated tire, those D's are gonna be squishy and not so fun when you tow.
 
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Old 08-16-2018, 11:46 AM
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I know folks who pull with them on 17 and 18 inch rims and haven't seen issues. You also need to look at the load rating of the rim. Most rims (included such like Innov8 expensive forge rims) top out at 3600lbs.

And seems like you're not pulling a huge load anyways.
 
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Old 08-16-2018, 12:11 PM
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Lightbulb

Check the rear axle GAWR spec on your truck’s cert label. For an SRW truck, each tire should be rated for one-half or more of the RGAWR.

Ford’s 18” and 20” wheels are rated for 3590 lbs., but Ford doesn’t seem to factor this limitation into some of their RGAWR figures.

HTH,
Jim / crewzer
 
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Old 08-16-2018, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Tricon View Post
No way. You need an E rated tire, those D's are gonna be squishy and not so fun when you tow.
Why? I'm towing now with an F150 on stock A/S tires, so moving to a 37" MT on a S/D is going to be worlds different any way.. Fully inflated, they support 7,000 lbs/axle. That's in line with the stock Ford wheels as noted above; aftermarket wheels are rated at 3600 lbs.

Originally Posted by SDcrewzer View Post
Check the rear axle GAWR spec on your truck’s cert label. For an SRW truck, each tire should be rated for one-half or more of the RGAWR.

Ford’s 18” and 20” wheels are rated for 3590 lbs., but Ford doesn’t seem to factor this limitation into some of their RGAWR figures.

HTH,
Jim / crewzer
See above...wheels rated at 3600 lbs. Right now we have a 26' TT weighing in around 5-5.5k lbs. Looking to upgrade to a 35-38' TT weighting around 8500 dry and up to 10-10.5k fully loaded (we don't add more than a few hundred pounds of gear/stuff).
 
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Old 08-16-2018, 01:08 PM
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Originally Posted by gravedgr View Post
Why? I'm towing now with an F150 on stock A/S tires, so moving to a 37" MT on a S/D is going to be worlds different any way.. Fully inflated, they support 7,000 lbs/axle. That's in line with the stock Ford wheels as noted above; aftermarket wheels are rated at 3600 lbs.
I wouldn't worry about the wheels, I'd worry about the sidewall stiffness. A D rated tire is going to be a lot squishier than an E rated. But hey, don't listen to me, go for it, you're not going to enjoy towing with it, no matter what the specs say. You're doubling your trailer weight and almost doubling your truck weight over your F150. A D rated tire is for a 1/2 ton truck.
 
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Old 08-16-2018, 01:24 PM
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Tricon is right. Go E without second thought. The problem with 35's and 37's is lower payload and if you end up in an accident and they can determine you are under "tired" for your load and it had anything to do with the incident you won't like the financial outcome.

Play it safe and stick with something E rated.
 
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Old 08-16-2018, 01:32 PM
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don't ask a question if you're not really ready for an answer that does not line up with your rationale.
Nothing more aggravating to me then those Tundra nuts rationalizing how they pull a 10k+ 5'vr with air bags yad yada yada.....
Same mindset here.
F-350 with its ratings are to be supported with E load range tires to meet those GVWR ratings.
Anything less and you are placing many others not just you and your family at risk.
A squishy ride would be the least of your problems.

However, it's your life and money. Hope I never drive anywhere near you.
 
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Old 08-16-2018, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Chinookman View Post
don't ask a question if you're not really ready for an answer that does not line up with your rationale.
Nothing more aggravating to me then those Tundra nuts rationalizing how they pull a 10k+ 5'vr with air bags yad yada yada.....
Same mindset here.
F-350 with its ratings are to be supported with E load range tires to meet those GVWR ratings.
Anything less and you are placing many others not just you and your family at risk.
A squishy ride would be the least of your problems.

However, it's your life and money. Hope I never drive anywhere near you.
It's nice to know virtue signalling and gross mis-assumptions aren't limited to other parts of the internet.

You'll notice my response to Tricon was to ask if "feel" was the primary reason. If so, that's a subjective issue.

Now, if ~3600 lbs is too low for GVWR/RAGWR or any other objective issue, that's fine and that is the information I was looking for. SDcrewzer pointed out the stock wheels are only rated for ~3600 lbs, so I kept asking what was the real issue. Speaking of, how can Ford not get away with that if its a major (someone said legal) issue?

You'll note that I never argued with anyone or gave any suggestion I was here for confirmation bias. I just want to understand the reasons (i.e. facts) without all the emotional baggage from people who can't help but read a post and then insert their own assumptions.
 
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Old 08-16-2018, 02:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Redrockerstl55 View Post
Tricon is right. Go E without second thought. The problem with 35's and 37's is lower payload and if you end up in an accident and they can determine you are under "tired" for your load and it had anything to do with the incident you won't like the financial outcome.

Play it safe and stick with something E rated.
From scanning Toyo's produce into page, it seems like the metric sizes tend (on average) to have a higher load rating for a particular "size" than the 37x and 35x. Is that on purpose? Just wondering if the lower ratings are an engineering thing or a market thing, simply because a lot of offroaders seem to gravitate toward tires with a two-digit height size. Completely anecdotal based on looking at one tire, but it did jump out at me.
 
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Old 08-16-2018, 02:25 PM
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Just go with the 20" Toyo's they are "E" rated.......
 
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Old 08-16-2018, 02:35 PM
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I run F rated 35x13.50-20. It can be done with 20's. Ride is very nice as well...
 
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Old 08-16-2018, 02:36 PM
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I’d also caution against getting too wrapped around the axle on this “D vs. E” issue. For LT size tires, D just means that the maximum load rating is based on a maximum of 65 psi cold inflation pressure.. E means that max load is based on 80 psi.

And, E doesn’t necessarily mean 10-ply construction. IIRC, the E tires on our old 2017 F350 were six-ply construction.

Everything else being equal, an E tire will have a load rating higher than a D. However, a “big” D tire may have a higher load rating than a “small” E.

I don't know about how all of this applies to flotation tires, but it might be worth investigating. The key thing is to get tires with a load rating (in lbs.) high enough to meet the axles’s GAWR.

HTH,
Jim / crewzer


 
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Old 08-16-2018, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by rfbrain View Post
Just go with the 20" Toyo's they are "E" rated.......
One of the local 4WP guys we deal with also suggested 20" wheels. I was hoping for a lower cost for 18s and a slightly improved ride, even though I like the look of the 20s as well, but don't want to create unnecessary risk. But here's where it gets confusing again...

37x13.5x18LT - load rating D, 3525 lbs max load (the tire I listed first)
37x12.5x18LT - load rating E, 3415 lbs max load

I thought Es always had a higher load limit than Ds, but that doesn't seem to be the case. They also make that same 37x12.5 tire in an F rating @ 3970 lbs, so dropping from a 13.5" wide to a 12.5" wide would also seem to do the trick. I'm just confused at how the smaller E tire supports less than the wider D.

But you're right though - going to a 20" rim size shortens the sidewall enough that they are all E or F rated. I did some quick poking around 4WPs site looking at other 37" tires of various rim sizes, and I'm not particularly thrilled with the choices (I know they're not the only place to get them, but it gives me some idea of how many options I'm like to have for a certain size). If memory serves, speccing 18" vs. 20" on the Stage 3 site as an example was around $700-ish in difference.
 
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Old 08-16-2018, 02:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Busa 1 Dave View Post
I run F rated 35x13.50-20. It can be done with 20's. Ride is very nice as well...
Thanks for the feedback! Do you have any pics?

Originally Posted by SDcrewzer View Post
I’d also caution against getting too wrapped around the axle on this “D vs. E” issue. For LT size tires, D just means that the maximum load rating is based on a maximum of 65 psi cold inflation pressure.. E means that max load is based on 80 psi.

And, E doesn’t necessarily mean 10-ply construction. IIRC, the E tires on our old 2017 F350 were six-ply construction.

Everything else being equal, an E tire will have a load rating higher than a D. However, a “big” D tire may have a higher load rating than a “small” E.

I don't know about how all of this applies to flotation tires, but it might be worth investigating. The key thing is to get tires with a load rating (in lbs.) high enough to meet the axles’s GAWR.

HTH,
Jim / crewzer
THANK YOU! That was confusing the hell out of me. I'm still confused about the weight rating on stock S/D wheels, but since I won't keep them its a non-issue not worth pursuing. I think its pretty clear the 20s are the better choice if I want to stay with the Toyo MTs. Thanks fellas, I knew someone knew the right answers!

 
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