500# over Payload Rating - Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums

Notices
2015+ F150 Discuss the 2015 Ford F150
Sponsored by:
Sponsored by:

500# over Payload Rating

Reply

 
 
 
  #1  
Old 07-22-2018, 11:54 AM
Foamster
Foamster is offline
New User
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 16
Foamster is starting off with a positive reputation.
500# over Payload Rating

I am preparing to order a 2019 Truck. I prefer to order a 2019 F-150 Regular cab equipped to have a payload rating of 3,000#, which with my 3,000# camper (wet) will be about 500# over Payload Rating with 2 persons and gas. I hope to replace the camper with a lighter rig within a year so how fragile is this situation if I am extra careful for that year?

Yes, I could get an F250 but the ride will be inferior for the life of the truck, and I prefer not to buy two trucks. Please share your opinions on how much risk is involved. With air bags the camper should ride level, but how “floaty” would it be?

 
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-22-2018, 12:12 PM
tomfiii
tomfiii is offline
Senior User
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 139
tomfiii is starting off with a positive reputation.
Is that the trailer tongue weight or whole trlr weight?
 
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-22-2018, 12:21 PM
Foamster
Foamster is offline
New User
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 16
Foamster is starting off with a positive reputation.
No trailer, a truck slide-in camper. Sorry, I did not make that clear. I thought payload implied a truck slide-in camper, but now it's obviously misleading. I do not intend to tow, certainly not with this camper in the bed.
 
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-22-2018, 12:21 PM
GlueGuy's Avatar
GlueGuy
GlueGuy is offline
Postmaster
Join Date: May 2015
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 2,615
GlueGuy has a good reputation on FTE.GlueGuy has a good reputation on FTE.GlueGuy has a good reputation on FTE.
I don't think he's talking about a trailer. I think he means a camper that sits in the bed.

My opinion is that it probably depends on how many miles, and what kind of terrain you intend to drive on.If you're going 10 miles on smooth pavement, then NBD. If you're going 10,000 miles off-road, there would probably be issues. There's a whole lotta space between those two extremes.
 
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-22-2018, 12:41 PM
Foamster
Foamster is offline
New User
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 16
Foamster is starting off with a positive reputation.
Ok, realistically a trip would involve 700 of miles of interstate to Utah, then 150 miles of off-road including some that could be at the limits of a factory vehicle, then hundreds of miles asphalt highways to Death Valley, then 100 miles of washboard, then hundreds of miles back to LA. Or maybe LA- interstate to Montana, then fire roads for a month, then interstate to LA. So minimal off-road at an extreme, but a few hundred miles of unimproved roads. How comfortable would you be in a vehicle at/over the limit.
 
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-22-2018, 01:24 PM
Lebowskii's Avatar
Lebowskii
Lebowskii is online now
Senior User
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 238
Lebowskii is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.
The truck should be able to handle 3000 pounds with no problem. I've hauled more than that in the back of my truck several times including 6000 pounds of topsoil once for a couple of miles. I say go for it....



 
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-22-2018, 01:30 PM
EB-Larry
EB-Larry is offline
Freshman User
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 44
EB-Larry is starting off with a positive reputation.
Keep in mind that any options on the truck will cut into your payload. You can find out the weight of the options then subtract them from your payload. I bought a 2018 F150 CC that should have given me a 2100 lb payload. I checked the payload sticker and it was actually 1590. Someone on here gave me a link to the option weights and when I added them up and subtracted them from the theoretic payload it came out about right. I would not put a 3000 lb camper on an F150 that even equaled my payload. I would say F-250 or F-350 with a real 4000 lb payload.

I's like the trailer capacity. I have a 6000 lb trailer but wanted a tow rating > 10000 lbs. Mine comes at 11,500.
 
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-22-2018, 01:35 PM
EB-Larry
EB-Larry is offline
Freshman User
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 44
EB-Larry is starting off with a positive reputation.
Originally Posted by Foamster View Post
Ok, realistically a trip would involve 700 of miles of interstate to Utah, then 150 miles of off-road including some that could be at the limits of a factory vehicle, then hundreds of miles asphalt highways to Death Valley, then 100 miles of washboard, then hundreds of miles back to LA. Or maybe LA- interstate to Montana, then fire roads for a month, then interstate to LA. So minimal off-road at an extreme, but a few hundred miles of unimproved roads. How comfortable would you be in a vehicle at/over the limit.
How often will you carry the camper? If very rarely not a problem. If left on the truck all the time I foresee wheel bearing replacements.
 
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-22-2018, 01:50 PM
Foamster
Foamster is offline
New User
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 16
Foamster is starting off with a positive reputation.
Camper is full time, but less than 10,000 miles per year, and I hope to replace it with a lighter camper in 12-18 months. Wheel bearing would be cheap if that was the only problem.
 
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-22-2018, 02:22 PM
scott91370
scott91370 is offline
Elder User
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Burleson, Tx
Posts: 976
scott91370 has a good reputation on FTE.scott91370 has a good reputation on FTE.
For payload you do not count the weight of fuel and there is also 150# allotted for the driver weight. This should, in theory bring you down 300# (depending on gas tank size, could be another 80#) - leaving you at only 200# over. I would venture to say engineering wise you'll be ok. Depending on if you get stopped & weighed is another story.

As far as the ride with airbags, I would guess it depends on the bags and psi. I run Airlift 2000. While I don't run anywhere near the payload with my trailer it doesn't bounce when towing even when aired up to 90psi (max is 100).
 
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 07-22-2018, 02:44 PM
ford390gashog's Avatar
ford390gashog
ford390gashog is offline
Post Fiend
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Brentwood,CA
Posts: 15,385
ford390gashog is a splendid one to beholdford390gashog is a splendid one to beholdford390gashog is a splendid one to beholdford390gashog is a splendid one to beholdford390gashog is a splendid one to beholdford390gashog is a splendid one to beholdford390gashog is a splendid one to behold
To the above, how do you figure you don't count fuel? Also how do you figure the 150 lb alloted driver? Its not overly complicated, just take it to a weigh station and get curb weight. Subtract curb from GVWR and you get payload. I will say we have plenty of RCLB trucks at work and none of them have a 3000lb sticker from factory. I believe you have to order the heavy payload package to get it.
 
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-22-2018, 03:09 PM
Foamster
Foamster is offline
New User
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 16
Foamster is starting off with a positive reputation.
According to Ford's brochure a 4x4 with 3.5 Ecoboost & HeavyDutyPayload and 18" wheels has a payload of exactly 3,000#. I thought I needed to subtract the weight of my wife and I (300#) and a tank of fuel (about 200#). That would put me 500# over...are you saying that is not the correct calculation? It would be fantastic if I was only 200# over. I can't use a weigh station because I am trying to decide whether to buy an F-250 or a smoother-riding 150.
 
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-22-2018, 03:23 PM
smokewagun
smokewagun is online now
Elder User
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: N. Illinois
Posts: 631
smokewagun is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.smokewagun is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.
Psyloads posted on the B-Pillar ALWAYS account for full tank of fuel and a driver weighing 150#.
ANYTHING beyond that comes off the remaining payload on the B-Pillar.
 
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 07-22-2018, 03:27 PM
GlueGuy's Avatar
GlueGuy
GlueGuy is offline
Postmaster
Join Date: May 2015
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 2,615
GlueGuy has a good reputation on FTE.GlueGuy has a good reputation on FTE.GlueGuy has a good reputation on FTE.
Generally speaking, "dry weight" does not include fuel or passengers. So those need to be added to the payload.
 
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 07-22-2018, 03:35 PM
NAZSD
NAZSD is offline
New User
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 19
NAZSD is starting off with a positive reputation.
I’d be concerned about the brakes with that load on an F150. Consider mitigating this with slower speeds and heavy duty brake pads. Also, tires may need to be in the load E range.

Add air bags and/or a Big Wig anti-sway bar if the sway is not tolerable.

For reference, I have a 2017 F250 Gas CCSB Fx4 with a 3000 lb camper. 11,000 miles with the camper last year and have spent considerable time thinking about an F150 replacing the F250 in order to have a more comfortable DD.
 
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: 500# over Payload Rating


Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: