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F150 or F250?

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Old 05-21-2018, 11:17 PM
GMoney1121
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F150 or F250?

I have been a long time lurker here, but finally decided its time to participate. I am looking for some advice, and not sure if this is a SD forum question, or an F150 question. I apologize in advance, this is probably going to be a long post, but I want to give the info for you all to understand. So here we go...

I accepted a promotion with my company a couple months ago, travelling by vehicle extensively(no different than other jobs I have had with the same company). I am finding that I will be towing a trailer more often than I thought, moving product around. Renting a trailer doesn't make sense anymore, as they charge $425/week, and I have been renting about every other week. I currently have a 2011 F150 FX4 Crewcab 3.5 Ecoboost with 122,000 miles I bought new in 2011. Problem is that it is due for some tires soon, is starting to rust in the cab corners, and is showing some very early signs of needing timing chains. I really don't like the idea of throwing a lot of money in to the truck while travelling(40-50k miles per year), and needing it to tow as well. So I am looking at replacing it with a new truck, but I am stuck on which would be my best option, a F250 diesel or F150.

I am going to be getting a 16-18'x7' aluminum trailer that will be loaded to about 6-7,000 lbs normally, towing 1-2 weeks a month average. The truck will also be my sole transportation, averaging about 45k miles per year, 80-90% highway miles. My concern is, yes the weight fits in the towing capacity for an F150, but will do it well enough to tow day in and day out at interstate speeds? Is the F150 made to tow like that, or will that many loaded miles wear it down too quickly? I like the price of the F150 more, obviously, but I don't want to throw money in to a truck that will just be beat to death. I am also a little concerned about the cost of maintenance and repairs on a diesel as well. Any advice is much appreciated.
 
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Old 05-22-2018, 12:10 AM
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That's a job for a diesel superduty. Maintenance is a little more expensive oil changes and fuel filters but not nearly as overblown as people make it to be. Get an extended warranty if you're worried about repairs but these 6.7s are pretty reliable.
 
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Old 05-22-2018, 03:59 AM
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6.7 all the way. What you are describing is the sweet spot for a diesel super duty.

The fuel filters and oil changes on the 6.7 are actually easy to do and easy access.

My my guess is the 6.7 will get better mpg towing than a f150 EB so there could be savings there.

The sound of the PSD is something special also. Although it tows silently on the highway.

My f250 weighs 8,300 lbs and all that extra weight makes me feel safer also.
 
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Old 05-22-2018, 04:01 AM
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I had 4 or 5 F150s before I went to my 2017 F250. I had both the 5.0 and the Eco Boost. My last was a 2016 F150. I had a 2014 F150 Eco steel body before that and had no problems pulling my 7X18 snowmobile trailer on the highway straight with no issues. When I got the '16 Alum. F150, towing the same load it had a tendency to drift around a lot on the highway which I hated. I put 10 ply tires on it thinking it was cheap tires but not change. I loved the truck but when they went to aluminum I believe they lightened them up to much for towing. Other then that it was a great truck I just hated the white knuckle ride when towing. I was hesitant about going to an F250 but I can now say it's the best truck I have ever owned. It just feels solid when driving or towing. This is also my first diesel and I love it so far. I hope this helps you.
 
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Old 05-22-2018, 04:52 AM
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Originally Posted by GMoney1121 View Post
I am going to be getting a 16-18'x7' aluminum trailer that will be loaded to about 6-7,000 lbs normally, towing 1-2 weeks a month average.
I have no EcoBoost experience so I might be a little in the dark there. My F150 experience in recent years (up to 2013) is with a 5.0. I own a 7x18 enclosed. With 4 Harleys, tools and luggage for 3 going from the NY/Canada border to Daytona I was in the 7.5 - 8 mpg range.
I moved up to an F250 in Sept. 2014. After that truck and a 2016 F250 I knew it was really the way to go. Both were 6.2 gas. Mileage just slightly better at 8.5 or so. Better brakes and a heavier truck for windy conditions if they arose.
I now have a 2017. Mileage is about the same but the ride quality and cab quietness & comfort are head & shoulders above the previous body in my opinion. Diesel is a $9k option, but it may well be worth it for you with the amount of towing and annual miles you plan on.
 
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Old 05-22-2018, 05:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Spatzboy
I had 4 or 5 F150s before I went to my 2017 F250. I had both the 5.0 and the Eco Boost. My last was a 2016 F150. I had a 2014 F150 Eco steel body before that and had no problems pulling my 7X18 snowmobile trailer on the highway straight with no issues. When I got the '16 Alum. F150, towing the same load it had a tendency to drift around a lot on the highway which I hated. I put 10 ply tires on it thinking it was cheap tires but not change. I loved the truck but when they went to aluminum I believe they lightened them up to much for towing. Other then that it was a great truck I just hated the white knuckle ride when towing. I was hesitant about going to an F250 but I can now say it's the best truck I have ever owned. It just feels solid when driving or towing. This is also my first diesel and I love it so far. I hope this helps you.
This.... I have to agree. I'm in my 1st super duty after have 7 f150's prior. That last 3 were ecoboost and last two were Max tows. My 14 max tow handled the load better then the lightened up 16. Also I have 5 different things I tow. I never see better then single digits with the ecoboost. I haven't towed all my trailers yet. Just got the super duty a few months ago. That said my mileage towing to is averaging 4mpg better and it handles the load effortlessly. If you are going to drive that many miles towing go with a truck that will darn near make you forgot that you are towing rather then stressing all the time. This too is my first diesel like above and it would be very difficult for me to go back now. Love it and have zero regrets.
 
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Old 05-22-2018, 05:57 AM
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I do the same thing. Except my truck is loaded and weighs 10,000# currently. Go F250 for sure. It's so much more sure footed and steady with utility trailers.

Nothing you mentioned requires the diesel. My work truck is a 6.2L gets about 50,000m per year, and idle hours are the same as driving hours. Only 25% of my mileage is T&M billable, the rest was contracted, or wasted. The diesel doesn't pay off for us until we're constantly towing 10,000#+ with a DRW truck. SRW are all gas, except for one that tows too much, and should be a DRW.
 
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Old 05-22-2018, 07:23 AM
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Thanks for all the responses guys! I was thinking a lot of the same things you guys have said, and was pretty well sold on a SD. I had an F150 5.0 blow past me on the highway yesterday, with a pretty good sized trailer, and it got me wondering if a SD was really needed. I did forget to mention that the past two weeks I have been in an F250 6.7 rental truck towing a company trailer, because for insurance reasons they won't let us tow it with our own trucks. The trailer is a little heavier than what I am looking at for myself, but it still tows like a dream, and I have forgotten it is back there a couple times.

Going back to my worries, they stem from the parts costs from a diesel. I thought about a 6.2, but from what I have heard, the fuel mileage while empty won't be nearly as good. At 45k miles a year, that would add up quick. If I went with an F150, I would probably go with the V8 in place of the 3.5 Ecoboost, for the same worries as the diesel. I bought the first gen Ecoboost in 2011 because it was the new, cool kid on the block, but the horror stories I heard from all over always had me on edge. At the rate I put on miles, warranties don't last long, and if a turbo goes out, ouch! I guess you could say I am cheap when it comes to that kind of stuff. I'm not too concerned about the cost of oil changes as the local ford dealership does free oil changes for life on vehicles purchased from them. If I don't buy from them, I do my own maintenance anyway, so the cost would only be the parts. I have always been a DIY mechanic and work with mechanics for a living(sales manager for a professional tool company), so I get some good advice and tips when needed on the harder repairs.
 
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Old 05-22-2018, 07:43 AM
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If you get a SD diesel, make sure it is a 350. Diesel destroys the payload on a 250.
 
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Old 05-22-2018, 08:30 AM
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My $0.02...we have a customer who distributes welding equipment throughout three states. He pulls a tandem axle enclosed trailer weighing 8,000lbs 5 days a week. He's on the Interstate every day. He had a 2010 F-150 with the 5.4L...put 200k on it and when the transmission failed he bought a 2013 F-150 with the EcoBoost. That truck went 200k with only one turbo failing. He has a 2016 F-150 EcoBoost doing the pulling now. He loves the way the EcoBoost pulls compared to the V8. Granted, the 5.4L wasn't as peppy as the 5.0L. Towing that kind of weight with an F-150 will see you going through brakes and tires more often than a Super Duty, but you'll also benefit from better unloaded fuel economy.

For me, I drive an F-250 diesel every day. My dad drives a 2016 F-150 EcoBoost every day. The 150 gets better fuel economy just driving around, no question. There is also nothing to worry about being a really expensive failure down the road. The 150 drives and handles a little nicer, it rides a little better, and it is much quicker off the line when empty. It also drives better in 2WD in the winter than the Super Duty. BUT...I still prefer the Super Duty for it's higher ride height, better sounding diesel engine, solid front axle, and ability to pull even heavier trailers.

As for the 250 vs 350, a 250 diesel crew cab is going to have anywhere from 2,000lbs payload to 2700lbs payload depending upon how fancy it is. That limits trailer pulling ability significantly. The 350 has a higher GVWR and stiffer rear springs which give you more.

I've had two gas Super Duty trucks...a 2012 F-250 and a 2015 F-350...no doubt, they do not get exceptional fuel economy. For me, average around town was 9-10mpg, interstate unloaded was 13-14mpg, and best ever unloaded on favorable 50mph roads was 16mpg. The current gen gas Super Duty's might do better being a little lighter, maybe more aero, and have the upgraded 6.2L engine. But I doubt it will be much different. The 6.2L is a great engine, however.
 
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Old 05-22-2018, 08:45 AM
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Originally Posted by acadianbob View Post
If you get a SD diesel, make sure it is a 350. Diesel destroys the payload on a 250.
This!!!
 
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Old 05-22-2018, 08:48 AM
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How much does all of that mileage pay?

Fuel cost difference is the lowest cost swing of operating trucks. Sure fuel costs plenty, but the difference between diesel and gas fuel economy, doesn't eat down time loss's, and repair costs. Those are huge. I have to go 200,000 miles with no failures of any type to get ahead.
 
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Old 05-22-2018, 08:56 AM
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Originally Posted by GMoney1121 View Post
I have been a long time lurker here, but finally decided its time to participate. I am looking for some advice, and not sure if this is a SD forum question, or an F150 question. I apologize in advance, this is probably going to be a long post, but I want to give the info for you all to understand. So here we go...

I accepted a promotion with my company a couple months ago, travelling by vehicle extensively(no different than other jobs I have had with the same company). I am finding that I will be towing a trailer more often than I thought, moving product around. Renting a trailer doesn't make sense anymore, as they charge $425/week, and I have been renting about every other week. I currently have a 2011 F150 FX4 Crewcab 3.5 Ecoboost with 122,000 miles I bought new in 2011. Problem is that it is due for some tires soon, is starting to rust in the cab corners, and is showing some very early signs of needing timing chains. I really don't like the idea of throwing a lot of money in to the truck while travelling(40-50k miles per year), and needing it to tow as well. So I am looking at replacing it with a new truck, but I am stuck on which would be my best option, a F250 diesel or F150.

I am going to be getting a 16-18'x7' aluminum trailer that will be loaded to about 6-7,000 lbs normally, towing 1-2 weeks a month average. The truck will also be my sole transportation, averaging about 45k miles per year, 80-90% highway miles. My concern is, yes the weight fits in the towing capacity for an F150, but will do it well enough to tow day in and day out at interstate speeds? Is the F150 made to tow like that, or will that many loaded miles wear it down too quickly? I like the price of the F150 more, obviously, but I don't want to throw money in to a truck that will just be beat to death. I am also a little concerned about the cost of maintenance and repairs on a diesel as well. Any advice is much appreciated.

I just traded my 2011 F150 3.5 Eco screw at 111,000. I have a 7500 travel trailer. That setup was very hard on the truck. While it certainly can tow that size trailer, it did fatigue the suspension and transmission at an advanced rate beyond normal. Also, the 1/2 tons "achilles heal" if you will is in the fact they're hitch weight max is very low in ratio to towing capabilities. Yes, it will tow. Yes you are most likely within the max limits set by Ford. However towing a trailer regularly is uncomfortable, potentially expensive in repairs, and possibly unsafe.

While the 150's now have the torque, I think it's too light of a vehicle day in and day out since you're more likely to hit inclement weather. Just my 2 cents.
 
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Old 05-22-2018, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by acadianbob View Post
If you get a SD diesel, make sure it is a 350. Diesel destroys the payload on a 250.
Good advice...my F250 PSD has a payload of just 1,950 lbs. I'm a Lariat Ultimate and there are quite a few bells and whistles I don't have that could make that payload number worse.

For the $1,500 or so it's worth it to go F350.
 
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Old 05-22-2018, 09:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Redrockerstl55 View Post
Good advice...my F250 PSD has a payload of just 1,950 lbs. I'm a Lariat Ultimate and there are quite a few bells and whistles I don't have that could make that payload number worse.

For the $1,500 or so it's worth it to go F350.
2x, rather 3x on the 350. No brainer for us. Like I said I can load up my trailer to max now and not even know its back there. I ended up with a fully loaded King Ranch and yes lots of bells and whistles.
 
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