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Are these engines THAT sensitive to water in fuel?

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Are these engines THAT sensitive to water in fuel?

 
  #1  
Old 03-31-2018, 07:45 AM
hollygreenman
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Are these engines THAT sensitive to water in fuel?

I am terrified of getting water in my fuel despite having an extended warranty and getting fuel receipts. Today it snowed hard here in purgatory, uh Minnesota, and I'm just about empty. All the diesel fuel pumps in town were covered in snow and my complaints fell on deaf ears (that's another story). So, I tried wiping one off, but there was snow deep inside the nozzle. So, home I go with 6 miles until empty. I'll just wait until later.

Too worried about it or right thing to do?
 
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Old 03-31-2018, 07:55 AM
razehm
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I don't know how well these engines water separators work. But I try to avoid filling up when it's raining or snowing. If the nozzle is wet I wipe it off with paper towels at the pump. But if I was that close I would fill up and make sure I had some fuel additive added. I look at it this way, something goes wrong with the engine and its anywhere from 12K to 20K to fix/replace. Hopefully someone does have a good answer.
 
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Old 03-31-2018, 08:01 AM
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First off never run the tank that low on fuel. Fuel is what keeps the fuel pump in the tank cool. Just because it's cold outside doesn't make any difference, it's a rule of thumb. You never want water in your fuel no matter what. Just run a little fuel into a fuel can before you put it in the truck. You can mix that fuel for the lawn mower. keeping fuel receipts makes no real difference because the fuel system isn't covered under the extended warranty. Good luck in the frozen tundra
 
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Old 03-31-2018, 08:32 AM
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I'm perplexed how snow is getting up inside the nozzles of the fuel pumps. When not in use, the nozzles are stored with the open tips inside the pump housing. Sure, I've refueled (in Minnesnowda) when the handle and outside of nozzle were covered in snow, but I've never seen water inside the nozzle. On the off chance I did, I'd simply point it toward the ground and give it a good shake. There's enough petroleum coating the inside of the nozzle that water is not going to stick.
Keeping your fuel receipts is a very good idea. If you ever do have a problem with the fuel system and the repair facility cites water intrusion as the cause, the station that provided the bad fuel will have to pay for the repairs. Receipts are an easy way to determine responsibility.
I have run my tank down to 50 miles DTE once or twice, but really prefer not to. As pointed out, fuel provides cooling for the fuel pump.
 
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Old 03-31-2018, 09:04 AM
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Probably the strong wind got snow everywhere. I didn't know that about the fuel pump. Advice well-taken, thanks.
 
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Old 03-31-2018, 10:25 AM
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Don't think the fuel pump is in the tank on these trucks. Running with very low fuel will heat the fuel some (as it circulated through the fuel system), but when snow is your problem, heating the fuel is not a problem.
 
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Old 03-31-2018, 12:03 PM
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Haven't burnt my pump up yet, never had water in my seperator either as a result of running the tank down. The tank is so small it's hard not to run it down till empty when towing. The DTE is not very accurate either, at 15 miles till empty I put in 23.5 gallons in the tank. Hand calculated I got 10.5 mpg on this tank, still had 26.25 miles before the tank would go dry.

 
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Old 03-31-2018, 04:00 PM
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Originally Posted by swarf_rat View Post
Don't think the fuel pump is in the tank on these trucks. Running with very low fuel will heat the fuel some (as it circulated through the fuel system), but when snow is your problem, heating the fuel is not a problem.
HFCM, ie; fuel pump is on the frame rails.
 
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Old 03-31-2018, 06:40 PM
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I'm from Texas so snow isn't an issue, but if there was snow pushed up into the fuel nozzle just carry a portable 2-3 gallon gas container and pump some diesel into it first. Then you should be able to pump diesel into your truck after clearing some of the snow.
 
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Old 04-01-2018, 07:43 AM
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Originally Posted by The Bone View Post
keeping fuel receipts makes no real difference because the fuel system isn't covered under the extended warranty.
From what I read, the entire fuel system, including injectors, is included in the two highest levels of the extended warranty. The lower levels exclude diesel injectors. Of course water in the fuel will result in much finger pointing as always. The station should not sell watered fuel, Ford should make a separator that actually works, and the operator should somehow prevent all water from entering, and on and on.
 
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Old 04-01-2018, 08:31 AM
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Originally Posted by swarf_rat View Post
Don't think the fuel pump is in the tank on these trucks. Running with very low fuel will heat the fuel some (as it circulated through the fuel system), but when snow is your problem, heating the fuel is not a problem.
Right you are. The Diesel Fuel Conditioning Module is the frame mounted lift pump where the first fuel filter is along with the built in water separator.

Use a quality fuel additive or don't. Opinions here vary. I use mine at every fillup.

Read your 6.7 Diesel supplement manual to give you insight into the truck.
 

Last edited by Overkill2; 04-01-2018 at 08:32 AM. Reason: add to post
  #12  
Old 04-01-2018, 09:21 AM
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Yes, these motors, as are all common rail system, can be damaged by water. It doesn't take much water to damage an injector that is designed for diesel fuel and 30,000 psi. Add water to this and good bye injectors.
 
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Old 04-01-2018, 10:39 AM
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Originally Posted by dirthawg View Post
Haven't burnt my pump up yet, never had water in my seperator either as a result of running the tank down. The tank is so small it's hard not to run it down till empty when towing. The DTE is not very accurate either, at 15 miles till empty I put in 23.5 gallons in the tank. Hand calculated I got 10.5 mpg on this tank, still had 26.25 miles before the tank would go dry.

I wouldn't do it your way.. I ran out once on 0 figuring the same as you did. The miles to Empty was spot on ..even thou the MPG was off with me as well. So I don't ever bring it past 0..especially on a long hill.. it will crap out sooner then 0.
 
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Old 04-01-2018, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by The Bone View Post
First off never run the tank that low on fuel. Fuel is what keeps the fuel pump in the tank cool. Just because it's cold outside doesn't make any difference, it's a rule of thumb.
There is no fuel pump in the tank.

It doesn't hurt these trucks to run the tank down. When it shows 0 MTE there's actually a bit more fuel left in the tank. Of course going down to zero or beyond that is risking having yourself stranded on the side of the road. As stated above, going down to zero and being on a hill can cause some issues as well where the remaining fuel sloshes back enough to not get picked up.

Your old diesels (such as the 7.3L IDI for example) had to have the fuel system primed if you ever ran out of fuel, so it was a big no-no back in the old days to run a diesel truck low on fuel or you took the risk of introducing air into the system. Modern diesels don't have that problem, including these trucks. You'll get a low fuel pressure warning and the engine will go to limp mode and/or shut down.

As for the OP's question, knock the snow off the pump and use a paper towel if there's any snow inside the nozzle. Other than that you're good to go. Drain the water separator periodically for good preventative maintenance. That little bit of residual water at the end of the nozzle isn't enough to cause concern.

If there's too much water in the fuel, the water separator will become saturated. At that point you will get a warning on the dash. DO NOT CONTINUE DRIVING. At the very least you must drain the water separator, in reality it's a best practice to replace the filter and fuel conditioner and check the fuel for water content.
 
 
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