2000 F-350 7.3L SD History Thread - Page 6 - Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums

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2000 F-350 7.3L SD History Thread

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  #76  
Old 03-14-2018, 12:09 AM
av8or1
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Well the weather didn't cooperate over the weekend to finish the welding project. Work intervened and I've been getting home with little daylight remaining, even after the time shift. So I switched gears a bit and decided to remove the wheels in preparation for the transfer to my 2000. I plan on taking a vacation day tomorrow so that I can get to the tire shop to have them removed, including the spare that came with my 2000 (which is also a factory wheel, if the markings on it can be believed). The idea is to hold onto the tires since the 1999 has a spring lift kit on it, transfer those tires to the wheels from my 2000 and then reinstall that combination on the 1999. I'll put new tires on the steels that I keep from the 1999 on my 2000. I'm even considering having the steels powder coated, we'll see.

I did decide that I don't want to run these:


The plan is to sell them to someone who'd want them, but I don't know what they go for, so I'll have to research that a bit. Not that I'm trying to squeeze everything I can out of them, they're just hubcaps. I simply don't know what to ask, that's all.

As you might expect they were/are running spacers in the rear on the 1999:



I removed all of it, tagged and bagged everything, including the spacers and kept moving. I don't mind working in the dark, but when dealing with this stuff, I'd prefer to do as little of it as possible. I then loaded the wheels and tires into the 2000 and will make the run tomorrow, as mentioned.

Truck as I left it tonight:


'Just looks funny without its wheels and tires!

I hope to finish the welding tomorrow while I'm off. If I do the powder coating, it'll have to sit like this for a couple of days at least...

Thanks,
Jerry
 
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  #77  
Old 03-14-2018, 02:17 AM
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You might want to consider talking more about your weld repair of the holes. I think readers and followers of your thread would find that far more interesting than my drivel about leaking cab vents and Ford wheel specifications.

Consider talking about the details... how you kept from blowing holes in the sheet metal, how you controlled your puddle on a vertical weld, how you prevented drop outs... especially drop outs behind, where molten ***** might roll down the inside of the A pillar. How you limited your heat input so tightly that the surrounding paint appears unaffected by your weld. How you kept the shielding gas from blowing away in the wind, causing porosity, if you used Mig. Or what process did you use? Self shielding flux core wire? How did you feather the bump back out? Flap disc? Did you remove the headliner? Cover any and plastic below in case a hot dingle berry flew when establishing the arc?

You've taken on an interesting task, and appear to be executing it with ease. I think your efforts are worth discussing in more detail, and would be helpful to future readers who might do the same thing as you... decide on a 7.3L, and find one warts, holes, and all, and have to deal with filling the holes, even if all the warts aren't burned off. This one aspect of your build is worthy of a break out thread, and perhaps even a video. But at the very least, you could go into what you've done and how you are going about it in more detail here. I think other readers would appreciate your explanation as much as they can appreciate seeing your results.
 
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  #78  
Old 03-15-2018, 12:02 AM
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Hey Y2K-

Good to hear from ya again; 'been a few days. Hope all is well. I read your post regarding the welding work...and I ask this sincerely, not in any sarcastic manner whatsoever...really? Folk might be interested in the welding stuff? Hmmmmmm...I would have thought that the least appealing to folk who might read this thread. In fact, I almost didn't mention it for that very reason. To speak openly I'm not certain how much interest there is in the endeavors I get myself into in general really and I don't want to appear to be self-absorbed or too "in your face" WRT posting on the forum. Therefore I don't post all of the pictures that I take nor video that I shoot. However I continue to tell my story just in case some aspect of the content might come in handy for someone in the future. That was the thought/plan/intent behind creating this thread in the first place: to help if I can. I can only hope that it does someday.

That said, since you asked, I don't mind discussing the welding a bit further. To answer your questions, yes I did remove the headliner (this was from several days ago, BTW, it's one of the pictures I elected not to post):

I found that you could remove it through the front passenger's door. I had been concerned regarding such an attempt; concerned over the possibility of folding it such that it tears or I introduce a crease (or multiple creases). However with patience and a slow-going process that didn't happen; it came out no worse for wear. Somewhat surprisingly, there wasn't any evidence of water damage to the headliner either, via a stain, saturation area or otherwise. So that was a big ! And the underside of the top of the cabin looked good too:


Ok back to the welding thing. I'll keep the answers straightforward. In my travels, I've often found that simplicity yields the best results. Not always clearly, but if you can meet the needs of a given objective simply and directly, then that is usually the best trail to walk down. Thus with the factors of an outdoor environment (with varying amounts of wind), a limited workspace, a small repair area and in a context of thin sheet metal, I decided that MIG, FCAW to be precise, was the best option for me. YMMV. After removing the headliner, I put a welding blanket in the cab to cover the interior. Specifically, to protect the dash, steering wheel, seat, seatbelt, etc. Because the first (or fourth, depending on your perspective) hole is actually *in* the A-pillar, there wasn't any protection to be had really WRT preventing the hot coalies from sauntering down that way. Furthermore I didn't have anything small enough to stuff in there anyway. I certainly had no intention of using a small towel or lint-free cloth (shop towel), that would not be the best idea! However to speak frankly I wasn't that worried about such a scenario coming to fruition because the welding that I felt was necessary wouldn't generate much of that. Ergo, with those conditions and that type and thickness of metal, I felt that the only reasonable approach was to apply short bursts, allow the area to cool, then repeat. Tack welding IOW. And that requires a lot of patience, a lot of time. Bleeech. I don't recall the voltage nor wire speed at this point, but I suppose I could take a gander at the welder in the next few days and post an update. It was quite low on both of those, as you might imagine. Just enough to avoid a cold weld is all you need here, IMHO. With such low heat (relatively speaking) and decent cooling periods in-between welds I didn't have a concern regarding affecting nearby paint, most of which I ended up grinding off anyway. Same applies to blow-through.

And in a nutshell that was my prescription. No seam welds, no laying-down of a continuous bead, nothing even approaching that was on my radar. Regarding the post-welding grind, I didn't like the small space nor the angle that was available for my flap disk and my air (compressor) situation stinks at the moment - else I would have used my small, right-angle die grinder, so I had to bust-out ol' faithful, my 4.5" Craftsman electric angle grinder with a medium coarse grinding disk. Using that in this context was challenging, but do-able. Unlike the flap disc, the grinding disc was capable of being used in such cramped quarters; most notably in the 90 between the cabin and the drip rail. It made short work of the task of course, which it usually does.

My initial implementation strategy was to simply fill-it weld the holes closed. However due to surprisingly small patches of rust that weren't immediately visible, that was tough sledding. I decided to put the die grinder to work to enlarge the holes so that I could assure myself that I was dealing with clean metal. By the time I did that, the fill-it approach was no longer reasonable IMHO, at least for a couple of the holes. So a re-group was in order. I decided that I would prefer to cut small patch panels from some surplus 14 gauge sheet metal that I had lying around after the mailbox project concluded late last year. I had wanted to apply those panels from the inside, tack the corners, then slowly fill-it weld over the panel, essentially using said panel as a backing plate, but one that would remain with the weld once completed. The idea being that if you weld it properly, you will create a hole-free result that continues to sport a "clean" exterior appearance once the weatherstripping is peeled back. However you can't really adopt that patch-it-from-inside thing with these trucks, since the cabin frame lies immediately behind the outer sheet metal. Sure there are small access holes in that frame, but in addition to being lacking in size, they weren't aligned with the four holes - wouldn't ya know it. In fact, three of the four holes were drilled through both the outer layer of sheet metal *and* the frame. How they missed the headliner is something of a mystery, but neither here nor there.

In the end, I put the panels on the exterior, tacked the perimeter fully, ground it all back and subjected the result to a light test. Two of the four holes on the driver's side *were* able to be closed with simple fill-it welds, mind you. I haven't made it to the passenger side yet so I don't know what I'll need to do there WRT panels versus fill-it. The resulting work on the driver's side though passed the light test, so I'm happy. And that's the story of the welding. Hope it's helpful to someone someday.

Regarding the cabin vents Y2K, oh heck no, what you've contributed regarding that subject is far from drivel. Great information actually. Keep it coming! And speaking of those, I have a problem with this 1999:

There just isn't any room to remove these critters due to a deformation in the forward wall of the truck bed. I tried and tried to no avail. Removing the bed to get to these will be a last resort for me, so I'll need to get creative to find an effective solution. I have one idea in mind, but not certain of its yield. TBD.

Finally, I began removing the dash and found that much mystery wiring abounded ... what was *this* supposed to do anyway?


And the overhead module didn't look as horrendous as I was expecting:


I don't know if these are available or if I'll need to develop something of my own. TBD, that too needs research. I'd also like to find the schematic for this thing (just the wiring to it), so if mueckster or anyone has that, I'd appreciate getting a copy. I'd like to take it to the bench, supply power to it and see what it'll do, if anything.

Ok I suppose that's enough at this point. That said, I did encounter a rough patch today, but more about that in the next post.
 
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  #79  
Old 03-15-2018, 12:42 AM
av8or1
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In an effort to "keep it real", I'd like to share today's story with you, if you don't mind. The project took an enigmatic and perplexing downward turn. I was able to push forward a bit despite that result, but it does serve to remind you that "fun" or "pet" projects can become "real" and "serious" and do so in rather swift, dramatic fashion. So it went today.

As I mentioned up-thread a couple of posts ago, I had a plan, an agenda that I wanted to accomplish with my vacation day. That plan was to have the tires separated from the wheels, drop the wheels off with the powder coating folk, store the tires temporarily, then press ahead with - and hopefully finish - the welding stuff. Ok so that didn't happen. Not even close.

I encountered an issue with my 2000, one that was unexpected, alarming and somewhat troubling. The short version is that I now have some electrical gremlin that has reared its ugly and disfigured head. "He's a nasty one", as the saying goes and as of tonight I'm still in the fight. Now for the somewhat longer version.

The batteries in my 2000 seemed to be going South, so I read a few posts and threads in the forum regarding the best batteries for our trucks. I developed a game plan for what I'd do if and when that happened. However as of 2 nights ago, things were ok. The truck would start and run. However my son likes to play inside daddy's truck dontchaknow. The interior lights drain the batteries right quick when he does so, and as a result I find myself charging them since embarking on this particular endeavor more than I ever have in the past. Even that hasn't presented a real issue to contend with thus far. Conceptually it isn't bad really. Well ... all that ended this morning. I had the wheels and tires loaded in the 2000, got in, turned the key to ON, waited for the "Wait To Start" light to extinguish and turned the key to START. And nothing. Suddenly the interior lights that had been on were off. The "idiot lights" on the cluster that had been on were now off. Wha-? Turned the key to the OFF position, then back to ON. Nothing, neechevoo. Huh??!?!!?! Opened the front driver's side door and the number-1 relay in (what I know as) the CJB is clicking on and off like someone's found its ticklish spot. Close the door, that stops. Open it again, it resumes. Close the door, it continues. What in the heck is going on? So I get out, check all connections, bust-out the DVMM to check the batteries (they were ok), loosened and removed the negative cables on both batteries, waited, re-attached them, secured them and went back to the cabin. Opened the door, and the interior lights are on again. Repeated the process I began with; key ON, wait, key to START. Same result: no lights, no nothing, relay-1 doing its best impersonation of a scalded banshee.

That was enough for me. Exited the truck, walked away to proverbially scratch my head at what had just transpired and to figure out what the heck I was going to do next.

Well the grand scheme for the day was over. I ended up spending the majority of the vacation day tracing down the gremlin. By early afternoon, my wife had called my son and I in for lunch. She inquired as to why the wheels and tires were still here. So I had to confess. We discussed it and given the nature of tracking these things down coupled with the limited time I'll have to throw at it until the weekend at least, we decided that I needed to replace the wheels and tires back onto the 1999. The thought being that it would be the safest option to take given that our son spends most of his days outside playing and loves daddy's trucks. Yeah, it was the right thing to do. But frick. So I brought the electrical gremlin detective work to a halt and did just that. Sheesh, who needs the gym after completing a cycle of that in ~15 hours?

By the time I was done and took care of other family duties, it was dark. So that's where things lie at present. As most of you are likely aware, when you tackle a seemingly innocent project such as this, be prepared for things going awry. I had that in the back of my mind, but nothing along these lines. I digress.

I'll keep ya posted with what I find.

Thanks,
Jerry

PS-Sold one of the CVPIs yesterday in amongst all of this truck business. Kinda sad to see it go, but it was just sitting...the wife was never gonna drive it, so...Anyway.
 
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  #80  
Old 03-15-2018, 10:43 AM
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That center console issue is a common one and fairly simple to fix yourself. Usually the resistors just need to be resoldered. No need for a schematic once you really look at it.
 
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  #81  
Old 03-15-2018, 11:53 PM
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Originally Posted by BBslider001 View Post
That center console issue is a common one and fairly simple to fix yourself. Usually the resistors just need to be resoldered. No need for a schematic once you really look at it.
Ok thank you for the tidbit. I found a good YouTube video regarding this very subject. When time avails I'll check the condition of the resistors in my unit.

EDIT: I forgot to mention that one reason I would like to get my hands on a schematic for this is because I'm not certain whether or not my 2000 has this wiring (and connector) installed or if it was omitted since it wasn't a Lariat. If so, I'll need to re-create the wiring or else develop a custom solution. I haven't removed that headliner yet to take a look. That's on the agenda though, maybe this weekend...

Jerry
 
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  #82  
Old 03-16-2018, 10:28 AM
av8or1
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Ok so file this under over-thinking, 'cause that's exactly what I did WRT this electrical gremlin business in my 2000. I chased bad grounds, poor junctions, chaffed wires, shorts, loose connections, everything I could think of, all to no avail.

That's when I decided to follow my own advice of walking down the shortest, most direct path. I revisited the batteries. The static charge test was good. The charger indicated that they were good. Took them to be tested. That showed that they are still in good shape. So I looked at the battery cables. These Interstate batteries are not sealed, so they've been doing their crusty business. Given that I converted the cables to military style a while ago, I loosened all of that kruft and gave it a good cleaning. Reassembled them, reattached them to the batteries, applied battery terminal protectant and BOOM! It starts right up, no issues. No more relay clicking faster than my old Labrador's left rear paw when you found his ticklish spot, no more cluster weirdness, no more interior overhead lighting guffaws, no more anything. Normal starting process, normal start. Alternator is charging normally. Crap but you gotta be kidding me! I hate it when I do that (overthink)! Oh well, it's in my DNA I suppose.

These will be my last unsealed batteries though. I'm thinking I'll go with the Optima Extremes once these Interstates go South. However I'll hold onto them and be more diligent with monitoring the crusties until that time comes. Might as well achieve their maximum lifespan dontchaknow.

So things are back online WRT the wheel business. Perhaps I can tend to that on Monday.

Thanks,
Jerry
 
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  #83  
Old 03-17-2018, 09:45 PM
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Had family stuff to do today but wanted to revisit this welding thing so that I could finish before the next rainfall. I managed to do that this afternoon, though often interrupted.

I finished the driver's side, it passed the light test, so I laid down a coat of primer:


The high spots are epoxy strips that I chose to leave in-place, workaround and then paint over. YMMV. After two coats of black and two coats of clear, it looks ok:


As I mentioned in a previous post, the inner cabin frame prevents me from taking the approach that I wanted, which would have achieved and nice, smooth-surface appearance. So with that, I gave-up-the-ghost WRT attempting to make things purty, and just concentrated on functionality. It was at that point that I decided to leave the epoxy strip remnants, BTW. Anyway, no light gets through and no water will either (though I will verify that after it has had time to fully dry).

So I proceeded to the passenger side. How whomever made these thought that it'd be ok to just leave them as-is or to just not even care is beyond me:


There were conflicting reports of the wet stuff greeting us later in the evening, so with that and a preference to finish today (before nightfall), I decided to forego the rather slow process of fill-it/build welding and just fabricate small patch panels:


The holes varied slightly in diameter, thus the reason for the different sized panels.

Unfortunately the weather did hit (the latest reports said that it wouldn't dontchaknow) and yours truly was drenched as a result. I hurriedly but steadily replaced the weatherstripping, closed the doors and drove the lawn tractor and trailer back into the outbuilding. The welder should be ok, no problem. The truck didn't get much water inside before I could close the doors. And wouldn't you know it but by the time I did all of that, the downpour stopped.

So that's as far as I made it along the path today. More tomorrow. I intend to finish the darn welding come hell or high water.

Thanks,
Jerry
 
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  #84  
Old 03-18-2018, 11:00 AM
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Hmmmmm....I had an interesting encounter this morning with a guy I know who is what I would refer to as a true hotrodder; someone who actually builds hotrods. You know, mismatched components in both large and small scale that originated from various vehicles, usually vintage in era, to form some type of one-off vehicle that is then dubbed "a hotrod." For whatever reason I don't have much interest in that type of work, but he sure does. Anyway.

I made the pseudo-mistake of mentioning that I'd like to have a larger on-board fuel supply for the longer trips. Oh boy did that set him off on a flurry of spontaneity. On-the-fly development of creative options came spewing forth at a pace exceeded only by the gargantuan pot on our stove that my wife overflows with whatever stuff is inside it and on a regular basis I might add. I mentioned that there are aftermarket solutions, though the rub on at least one of them is that it sits a bit low. 'Also mentioned the rear tank in the spare wheel/tire area. "Those are bunk", he replied. "Do something original, something unique!" "Like what?" I asked with some trepidation. "Oh just add one here on the other side. I know a guy who has a stock tank from an 06 6.0, it'd work." "Uhhhh...but what about the exhaust? That's kinda important isn't it?" I replied in jest. "Meh, just re-route it between the tanks where you need to or take it out the side or even up like a semi. You've seen those before, right?" "Oh sure, sure. I understand now." I said, in full internal raised eyebrow mode. I managed to change subjects by getting him to talk about his stuff and we were off-topic rather quickly.

Anyway, thought y'all might get a kick out of it...

Gotta run some family errands, then back to the passenger side repair. More later.

Thanks,
Jerry
 
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  #85  
Old 03-18-2018, 11:22 AM
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Originally Posted by av8or1 View Post
The holes varied slightly in diameter, thus the reason for the different sized panels.
Did you consider using SteelStik JB Weld putty to fill the holes? https://www.jbweld.com/products/stee...xy-putty-stick

I used it to modify my fuel bowl when I removed the heater bowl element electronic interface, filling the hole previously occupied by the heating element sensor plug.

Stewart
 
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Old 03-18-2018, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Stewart_H View Post
Did you consider using SteelStik JB Weld putty to fill the holes? https://www.jbweld.com/products/stee...xy-putty-stick

I used it to modify my fuel bowl when I removed the heater bowl element electronic interface, filling the hole previously occupied by the heating element sensor plug.

Stewart
Was wondering the same. It sure would have been a LOT less work LOL!
 
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Old 03-18-2018, 07:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Stewart_H View Post
Did you consider using SteelStik JB Weld putty to fill the holes? https://www.jbweld.com/products/stee...xy-putty-stick

I used it to modify my fuel bowl when I removed the heater bowl element electronic interface, filling the hole previously occupied by the heating element sensor plug.

Stewart
Hi Stewart-

No, I am not familiar with the SteelStik product, so it wasn't on my radar. I am familiar with JB Weld however. I've always preferred the real McCoy WRT these types of repairs, generally speaking. That said, I did try JB Weld for the first time about 3 or 4 years ago. Holy hell but does that stuff stink! I mean it reeks to no end! After one application of it, I abandoned the idea of using it for that repair, and put the tubes in the very back of the cabinet. 'Thought being that if there was ever a repair where the awful, atrocious smell wouldn't play a factor and if I didn't want to or couldn't weld it (perhaps for access reasons) then I might use this kruft for that application. That and it's difficult for me to throw (some) stuff away. Does this SteelStik thing stink to high hell too? If so, I'll pass. There's no way I would put that anywhere near the cabin, for concern that the malodorous odor would waffle its way into said cabin and render the truck all but undrivable, Unless of course you own a really big pair of clothes pins, an old WWII era gas mask or something else along those lines.

And having said all of that, there was another factor at play here. The opportunity to weld. You see, at the tail end of my high school days I did all kinds of welding. 'Had a professional welder in the family in fact. However during undergrad I found that there was no time for that stuff anymore, and then the career thing came along; couple all of that with apartment living (limited access to any garage really and no time to boot) and my skills went South. I was fortunate to know a couple of old timers who had welding setups around their houses who would allow me to come over and weld a little here 'n there but it was spotty and just enough to make me say "I really need to work on obtaining my own setup", then not be able to do so.

Anyway.

Short version is that since I am fortunate enough to have an outbuilding on my property (that was arguably the primary reason that I purchased this house in fact), I've resumed that ol' hobby from so many years ago and look for every opportunity to light the fire that presents itself. For that reason alone, welding these holes shut was the only option for me.

And speaking of that, I managed to finish the passenger side today. But holy hell! TEXAS weather got the better of me *again*! No sooner than I had the panels in place, welded, ground back, primered, painted and 1 coat of clear on did the heavens open up, just as it did yesterday! It's as if the good Lord doesn't want me to finish this repair!

I loathe the rain sometimes. There was about 10 minutes warning though, so I managed to get the lawn tractor, welder and all associated equipment back into the outbuilding beforehand. My son just *had* to ride with daddy dontchaknow, so that was a must-do, even though it slowed the prep down a bit.

I digress. In the interest of doing all I can to produce a top-notch repair I managed to get the cover back on the cab before any real wet stuff got on it. I was then pelted with hail stones for my trouble. I latched the four corners of the cover onto the bottom of the four corners of the cabin and literally dove underneath while the hail continued to fall. Fortunately it wasn't anything big, but it was enough that if it hit you on the head, you'd notice. Once that letup I closed the outbuilding and snatched up my son's electric kid's riding tractor and trailer. By this time I was drenched, no need to rush, so I just walked it on in; the hail had subsided. And of course just as I did that and pulled the extension cords under the porch it let up and the sun came out. That's TEXAS weather for ya.

So I'll get out there a little later possibly to see how things look. I'll post a picture of the result when I can.

Thanks,
Jerry
 
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Old 03-18-2018, 08:18 PM
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Well the cover appears to have done its job:


This won't win any awards, but it will do what it was intended to do, which is to keep water out of the cabin:


Prior to the rain both doors on the driver's side were closed. A quick check of the front lower sill area on that side showed no water!

The "real test" will come in the form of my wife with a water hose, but for the time being that is a positive indicator, so I'll take it!

Thanks,
Jerry
 
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Old 03-19-2018, 09:28 PM
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After work I took a another look at the passenger side repair. It's still looking good WRT excluding water, so I have moved on to the aft cabin vents. Y2K got me started on this cabin vent business up thread. I asked if the bed would need to be removed in order to deal with these critters. He stated that it wouldn't, but as it turned out, I had good reason to ask. That is - and as I have mentioned a few posts ago - the forward wall of the bed on the 1999 has been deformed forward a bit. Nothing wild or overly noticeable, but just enough to prevent the removal of the cabin vents from within the cabin. So today I embarked on a process to affect one type of repair. The idea was and is that since there isn't a straightforward way of addressing water entering through the vanes, I'd opt to simply close-off the perimeter of these vents by applying a bead of silicone between the outer cabin wall and the inner vent surface. However I could not find a method that would allow me to apply the silicone; there just wasn't sufficient space. Ergo, no gap between the two, or at least nothing I could get silicone into with any confidence that employing such an application method would yield anything worthy of the effort required therein. In short, it would be crap, so it'd be better to simply leave as-is.

However I just can't do that. I must achieve some type of relatively decent repair. And with that, I decided to see what I could do WRT moving the bed aft just enough to allow me to get-at those vents. See what you get me into Y2K??!!?!

So I began by freeing-up the fuel filler port:


Somehow I had it in my head that there were eight bolts that held the bed to the frame, two on each side forward of the rear wheels and two on each side aft of them. I also had it stuck in my noggin' that you loosened them from beneath. Eh...no. There appear to be only four bolts in total, one on each side aft of the wheel and one forward of it, up near the cabin. Furthermore, you loosen them from above via a T-45 bit:


The driver's side came out with little difficulty. The passenger side however put up a serious fight. I needed penetrating fluid, a solid, long ratchet and a cheater bar. Finally it gave way:


However wouldn't you know it, that was all too easy. As it turns out on this particular truck, someone installed what appears to be an adjustable gooseneck rail-based mounting system, thus:


And of course some of these bolts won't loosen, as their captive nuts underneath are no longer secured. Therefore tomorrow I'll need to get my wife and son involved to have them use the cordless to undo the bolts via the bolt head while I lie underneath using whatever I can to secure the I-wanna-spin-too friggin captive nuts in place. IIRC there are at least 5 of these PITAs, of differing sizes, so it will be an interesting experience.

My son is all for it though, even attempting to instruct me on how to apply the wrenches:


My wife OTOH, well she's a good woman, so she'll do it for me but it won't be her first choice of how to spend the afternoon, so I'll need to prepare so that it can go quickly.

Anyway, the plan is to loosen the bed, slide it aft just far enough to remove the vents, apply the silicone, reinstall and use some of the blackout tape on the exterior, as Y2K did. That repair should prevent water from entering the sides, top and bottom. Then reposition the bed, reinstall the retaining bolts, reinstall the fuel filler neck and call it good.

I have a slightly different approach in mind for my 2000, but more on that later.

Thanks,
Jerry
 
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Old 03-19-2018, 09:50 PM
av8or1
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I forgot to mention that I have successfully applied for a title for the 1999 from the state of TEXAS. I paid the taxes and fees, completed the forms and am waiting for the title to arrive in the mail. They claim 2 - 4 weeks. For this reason I don't feel pressure to finish and reclaim the cash we put forward on this donor truck just yet, but I feel relatively confident that once the title is in-hand, I will. Attempting to temper that with reason and a sense of "doing it right." So far it's working. Heck, it's not like we are unable to pay our mortgage or anything until we sell, so hey, enjoy the process, right? My advice to anyone considering such an endeavor as this is to ensure that you have the "play money" to do it. You never know what you'll encounter, so it's good counsel to allow yourself the space and time to utilize a conservative approach. Just my $.02.

Finally, I put the caps on the market today. I decided to try-out the new Ford-trucks marketplace while I was at it. Nice interface it has, I might add. Also hung a for-sale sign on them locally via Craigslist (CL). I don't like dealing with the crazies you often find on CL, but it is what it is. When I sell-on this 1999, I'll have to go down this road again. Might as well endure a trial run, dontchaknow. Not looking forward to selling the truck via CL I must admit. I'll also list in in our forums; I would prefer to sell it here if possible, that way I'll know that it will go to a good home. Anyway, TBD. I didn't know how much to ask for the caps, so I guessed at $100.

So that's where things are.

Thanks,
Jerry
 
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