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Need IPR wiring info-diagram, quickly please (2000)

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Need IPR wiring info-diagram, quickly please (2000)

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  #1  
Old 09-11-2017, 10:07 AM
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Need IPR wiring info-diagram, quickly please (2000)

I'm looking for a 2000 F350 SRW Auto 4WD wiring diagram that shows the complete IPR wiring and control path.

It's for a truck with a new IPR that can be temporarily powered with 12v and truck starts.

Something in the wiring or control circuits are not working/getting power and we need to trace it back to find out where the harness might be damaged, or which circuit powers it.

Can someone help?

Thanks!
 
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Old 09-11-2017, 11:38 AM
pirschwagon
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Attached - Two Wire Analog Circuit (Hz)

The IPR is commanded by the PCM. I do not recall if it is a Pull-Up / Pull Down Type. So, as a word of CAUTION: Pulling and checking wires. **REMOVE KEYS unless testing**. You will FRY the PCM if it goes to Ground with the Key-On if its Pull Down.

Well, I can't attach for some reason. Here is a JPG.
 
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Old 09-11-2017, 11:44 AM
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Originally Posted by pirschwagon View Post
Attached - Two Wire Analog Circuit (Hz)

The IPR is commanded by the PCM. I do not recall if it is a Pull-Up / Pull Down Type. So, as a word of CAUTION: Pulling and checking wires. **REMOVE KEYS unless testing**. You will FRY the PCM if it goes to Ground with the Key-On if its Pull Down.
I don't see any attachment? (Edit: I see it now, thanks!)

Good word of caution on the PCM side/ground.

We're going to test the IPR by only applying +12v to the red wire and allowing the PCM to command the ground, see if it starts.

Trying to find a diagram for what is feeding the +12v side. I read it is in a "battery junction box" but not sure where or a fuse/relay or whatever
 
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Old 09-11-2017, 12:03 PM
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Looks like that diagram will be the winner, thanks!

Looks like we can test +12v on the AIH input side of the relay and on the GP relay input sides to make sure it is working.

Next step is disconnect both batteries, Ohm the wire from the relay input side to the IPR pigtail RED +12v side and replace the wire if necessary.

I'm betting someone eliminated or mixed up the wiring on the AIH or GP relays.

I sent the info to my buddy who is with the truck, I can't get there today.

Thanks!
 
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Old 09-11-2017, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by ExPACamper View Post
I don't see any attachment? (Edit: I see it now, thanks!)

Good word of caution on the PCM side/ground.

We're going to test the IPR by only applying +12v to the red wire and allowing the PCM to command the ground, see if it starts.

Trying to find a diagram for what is feeding the +12v side. I read it is in a "battery junction box" but not sure where or a fuse/relay or whatever
The IPR is "Driven" by the PCM. It adjusts from about 4v to 9v IIRC. Voltage is applied based on feedback from the ICP.

It is not Ground Switched, rather (+) (Duty Cycle - Analog) from the PCM.

Just making this up - The ICP requires 1500 psi, the PW (or DC%) is adjusted. xx vdc to the IPR opening or closing as necessary using the wound electro-magnet on the IPR.

Use a Test lamp on the (-) Battery Cable. While cranking the truck see if you get a signal on one. That will tell you

1. If it lights - You have a ground problem or resistance in the circuit.

2. If it doesn't, the Driver Signal is either not present or, an open somewhere in the wiring.

Do the same thing Back-Pinning the PCM Connector. If you have no signal, its PCM (or a dependent sensor such as ICP wiring. If you have signal, it an open.

IIRC - and, its been a while, its pin #83 or #84 on the DIT. Just match the Colors on the PCM's 101 Pin Connector. DISCONNECT it if you are going to put ANY voltage to the circuit troubleshooting it.
 
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Old 09-11-2017, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by pirschwagon View Post
The IPR is "Driven" by the PCM. It adjusts from about 4v to 9v IIRC. Voltage is applied based on feedback from the ICP.

It is not Ground Switched, rather (+) (Duty Cycle - Analog) from the PCM.

Just making this up - The ICP requires 1500 psi, the PW (or DC%) is adjusted. xx vdc to the IPR opening or closing as necessary using the wound electro-magnet on the IPR.

Use a Test lamp on the (-) Battery Cable. While cranking the truck see if you get a signal on one. That will tell you

1. If it lights - You have a ground problem or resistance in the circuit.

2. If it doesn't, the Driver Signal is either not present or, an open somewhere in the wiring.

Do the same thing Back-Pinning the PCM Connector. If you have no signal, its PCM (or a dependent sensor such as ICP wiring. If you have signal, it an open.

IIRC - and, its been a while, its pin #83 or #84 on the DIT. Just match the Colors on the PCM's 101 Pin Connector. DISCONNECT it if you are going to put ANY voltage to the circuit troubleshooting it.
Thanks for this information. I have some questions, though.

In the diagram it shows 12v coming from the INPUT side of the AIH and GP solenoids (or at least from the same circuit), and shows 12v at the IPR on the diagram.

I don't see how that could be regulated input?

Now I do understand how a pulsed ground from the PCM could affect duty cycle that could be interpreted by DVOM to be lower average voltage. The Ford 460 gasser does this for their fuel pump, which I am familiar with and have worked on.

I thought from the diagram it worked the same way?

If not, where/how would the +12v be regulated to different voltages?
 
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Old 09-11-2017, 02:55 PM
cleatus12r
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The IPR is controlled by a constant 12 volt, 440 Hertz duty cycle. It is controlled by a transistor in the PCM. There is always 12 volts to one side of the IPR coil and it is low side switched by the PCM.
 
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Old 09-11-2017, 04:40 PM
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Originally Posted by cleatus12r View Post
The IPR is controlled by a constant 12 volt, 440 Hertz duty cycle. It is controlled by a transistor in the PCM. There is always 12 volts to one side of the IPR coil and it is low side switched by the PCM.
Perfect. Thank you for confirming that information. I couldn't see how it could be controlled on the +12v side from the diagram

Sorry it's taking so long for my replies. Still dealing with funeral homes, insurance, estates, etc. Seems like every call is an hour

I appreciate all the good, quick help!
 
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Old 09-12-2017, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by ExPACamper View Post
Still dealing with funeral homes, insurance, estates, etc. Seems like every call is an hour
Did I miss a post? Did you lose someone?

Stewart
 
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Old 09-13-2017, 07:37 AM
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Originally Posted by ExPACamper View Post
Perfect. Thank you for confirming that information. I couldn't see how it could be controlled on the +12v side from the diagram

Sorry it's taking so long for my replies. Still dealing with funeral homes, insurance, estates, etc. Seems like every call is an hour

I appreciate all the good, quick help!
Perhaps this will provide a better explanation of how the IPR is Powered and controlled by the PCM. It is "Pull-Down-Switched" Here is the "official operational processes" for the IPR:

Pressure control in the injector control pressure system is closed loop. It is controlled by the injection pressure regulator (IPR), the injection control pressure (ICP) sensor and the strategy in the powertrain control module (PCM).

The IPR is a pulse-width modulated valve operating at 400 Hz. The pulse width is modulated from a duty cycle of 8 to 50% to control injection control pressure from 3.4-20.7 MPa (500-3000 psi). The IPR is mounted in the high pressure pump and achieves injection control pressure regulation by discharging excess oil through a shuttle valve into the front cover and back to sump.

The PCM controls the injection pressure regulator (IPR) by an internal ground switch (low side driver) internal to the PCM. Pressure control is a variable function of the engine control strategy and the calibration that has been programmed into the PCM.

The injection control pressure (ICP) sensor is mounted on the left cylinder head and is the feedback signal for the closed loop control system. The ICP sensor is a ceramic disk-type pressure sensor that converts pressure into a 0 to 5 volt analog signal that the PCM uses to determine injection control pressure. Typical operating range is 0.7 to 3.2 volts.

A spring/piston pop-off valve is installed internal to the high pressure pump and is set to discharge oil pressure into the front cover in the event injection control pressure exceeds 27.6 MPa (4000 psi).


As with "most" Ford EFI until the early 2k, PWM was the most used in all their vehicles. Basically, using Binary (128 = 0 Higher numbers are a "+" / Lower numbers are a "-")

In 2008 it was Mandatory to begin a newer process call "Computer Area Networking". Or "CAN". In a nutshell, The CAN uses multiple ECM's. Typically the CAN Bus is made up two wires, CAN-H (CAN High) and CAN-L (CAN Low) which connect to all the devices in the network. The signals on the two CAN lines have the same sequence of data, but their amplitudes are opposite. So if a pulse on the CAN-H line goes from 2.5V to 3.75V then the corresponding pulse on the CAN-L line goes from 2.5V to 1.25V (opposite than CAN-H). By sending the data in equal and opposite ways like this allows for greater noise immunity and therefore less chance of the data being corrupted.
 
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Old 09-13-2017, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by pirschwagon View Post
Perhaps this will provide a better explanation of how the IPR is Powered and controlled by the PCM. It is "Pull-Down-Switched" Here is the "official operational processes" for the IPR:

Pressure control in the injector control pressure system is closed loop. It is controlled by the injection pressure regulator (IPR), the injection control pressure (ICP) sensor and the strategy in the powertrain control module (PCM).

The IPR is a pulse-width modulated valve operating at 400 Hz. The pulse width is modulated from a duty cycle of 8 to 50% to control injection control pressure from 3.4-20.7 MPa (500-3000 psi). The IPR is mounted in the high pressure pump and achieves injection control pressure regulation by discharging excess oil through a shuttle valve into the front cover and back to sump.

The PCM controls the injection pressure regulator (IPR) by an internal ground switch (low side driver) internal to the PCM. Pressure control is a variable function of the engine control strategy and the calibration that has been programmed into the PCM.

The injection control pressure (ICP) sensor is mounted on the left cylinder head and is the feedback signal for the closed loop control system. The ICP sensor is a ceramic disk-type pressure sensor that converts pressure into a 0 to 5 volt analog signal that the PCM uses to determine injection control pressure. Typical operating range is 0.7 to 3.2 volts.

A spring/piston pop-off valve is installed internal to the high pressure pump and is set to discharge oil pressure into the front cover in the event injection control pressure exceeds 27.6 MPa (4000 psi).


As with "most" Ford EFI until the early 2k, PWM was the most used in all their vehicles. Basically, using Binary (128 = 0 Higher numbers are a "+" / Lower numbers are a "-")

In 2008 it was Mandatory to begin a newer process call "Computer Area Networking". Or "CAN". In a nutshell, The CAN uses multiple ECM's. Typically the CAN Bus is made up two wires, CAN-H (CAN High) and CAN-L (CAN Low) which connect to all the devices in the network. The signals on the two CAN lines have the same sequence of data, but their amplitudes are opposite. So if a pulse on the CAN-H line goes from 2.5V to 3.75V then the corresponding pulse on the CAN-L line goes from 2.5V to 1.25V (opposite than CAN-H). By sending the data in equal and opposite ways like this allows for greater noise immunity and therefore less chance of the data being corrupted.
Very nice, thanks!
 
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Old 09-13-2017, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Stewart_H View Post
Did I miss a post? Did you lose someone?

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