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Any Experience with Enerburn?

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Any Experience with Enerburn?

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  #61  
Old 10-05-2017, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by swarf_rat View Post
Being a skeptic of most engine and fuel additives, I did some research on Enerburn. The effect is actually well researched. The introduction of many metals in fine powder form does have a catalytic effect on diesel (and gas) combustion. There are several scholarly papers on this, and more than a few industry papers. Most of the producers of diesel catalysts (there are several) have a proprietary mix of ingredients, but ferrocene is popular. Enerburn purchased the patents for this particular product from Exxon/Esso.

The more rigorous tests that you see in the literature have been done on large generating and pumping plants, also large marine diesels. Most agree that reductions in soot of around 50% is possible, with some claiming a reduction of 90%. Most also agree that a small increase in power or thermal efficiency is possible, in the range of 2 - 12%. One paper I found compared the caloric value of the soot and concluded that the the reduction in soot (by more complete combustion) accounted for the increased thermal efficiency. Any increase in power comes from quicker ignition, similar to an increase in cetane. Enerburns marketing claims that it "nano coats the cylinders with catalytic something or other" is not reflected in the literature - the effect is due to lowering the activation energy during combustion, any coating is a side effect.

I'm still skeptical. But I put some in the last two tank fulls and it does seem to behave differently. On the second tank full the dash meter climbed about like always but the DPF load and other indicators reported by Forscan were much lower. Usually the %DPF load on Forscan is higher than the dash gage, it will hit about 135% when the dash gage gets to 100%. I'm also somewhat further than my historical regen average and the dash gage is only showing 75% (Forscan showing 35%), half way through the second tank. Need to run a few more tanks of fuel to see.
Excellent post and good info. My Edge CTS which doesn't require formulas, actually reaches 100% DPF Load when the truck says DPF Full is at about 70%, then it goes blank after that. However, with Enerburn, DPF Load and GPL stay low while %DPF Full climbs until 500 miles is reached.
 
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Old 10-06-2017, 11:55 AM
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I believe all the OBD monitors are looking at the same data from the PCM. On Forscan this is called "DPF Load Inferred" which I believe is a number calculated by the PCM from several indirect inputs. I think one of the inputs is mileage since the last regen. Other inputs are probably the particulate comb sensor and exhaust back pressure. Ford must have programmed these for average fuel and conditions. If something like Enerburn actually works and produces a lot less soot the algorithms are going to be off because the assumptions are wrong.
 
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  #63  
Old 10-08-2017, 08:08 AM
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Given my experience with Enerburn keeping soot down to post regen levels while towing, it would be great if I could somehow get the mandatory regen changed to, say, 600 miles. I did take a 275 mile trip without the trailer yesterday as well as some additional around town driving and the soot levels appear to be more what I would get using AR6200, but I will have to wait for the next regen to see how it plays out, but it does go to what I've said about heat still being needed.
I see that folks who got the TSB for the regen jack hammering have commented about both MPG being improved and regens being shorter, so I wonder what changed with that TSB other than simply injecting extra fuel from both sides.
 
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Old 10-20-2017, 07:17 AM
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I am reposting this from the Additives thread simply to keep information about Enerburn in one thread.
After a tow trip of over 2000 miles, I can say that Everburn dramatically reduces the amount of soot in the exhaust system per the GPL (grams per liter) and DPF Load indicators on my Edge CTS. That does not translate to Ford's %DPF Full as with low soot, it becomes more a mileage indicator. I actually had a couple of regens at 400 miles with GPL under 1.00 and DPF Load at zero, plus one with the %DPF Full at 85% so there are regen triggers outside of these items.
I've only driven enough non towing miles to see that Enerburn doesn't keep soot from building under normal conditions, but I suspect it reduces soot with a cleaner burn and that it works like AR6200 under normal driving, slowing the buildup of soot. Any soot reduction improves the life of engine oil, turbo and EGR even in deleted trucks (minus the EGR).
Fuel mileage has too many variables to determine if there was any improvement, plus I was using AR6200 prior so it is probably a wash. I got 11-12 mpg for the trip which included some non towing miles, but construction delays, accident delays, terrain, speed and wind played a part in fuel mileage. I got about 12.2 the first day out and less after that with the all towing return trip at 11.2 with a 10K fifth wheel in tow at 62-64 mph and a 35 minute accident delay.
 
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  #65  
Old 10-20-2017, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by SkiSmuggs View Post
I am reposting this from the Additives thread simply to keep information about Enerburn in one thread.
After a tow trip of over 2000 miles, I can say that Everburn dramatically reduces the amount of soot in the exhaust system per the GPL (grams per liter) and DPF Load indicators on my Edge CTS. That does not translate to Ford's %DPF Full as with low soot, it becomes more a mileage indicator. I actually had a couple of regens at 400 miles with GPL under 1.00 and DPF Load at zero, plus one with the %DPF Full at 85% so there are regen triggers outside of these items.
I've only driven enough non towing miles to see that Enerburn doesn't keep soot from building under normal conditions, but I suspect it reduces soot with a cleaner burn and that it works like AR6200 under normal driving, slowing the buildup of soot. Any soot reduction improves the life of engine oil, turbo and EGR even in deleted trucks (minus the EGR).
Fuel mileage has too many variables to determine if there was any improvement, plus I was using AR6200 prior so it is probably a wash. I got 11-12 mpg for the trip which included some non towing miles, but construction delays, accident delays, terrain, speed and wind played a part in fuel mileage. I got about 12.2 the first day out and less after that with the all towing return trip at 11.2 with a 10K fifth wheel in tow at 62-64 mph and a 35 minute accident delay.
I have a question. This is the first time I have pulled since getting the Edge CTS. Started at 3.7 GPL soot and about 43%, 2 hour tow, the GPL continued up to 5.6 but continually dropped down to 27% on DPF. I figured the GPL would drop with the DPF % but did not. Is that normal? Exhaust temps were in the 700ís through 900 majority of the trip so I figured it was hot enough to be cooking it off.
 
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  #66  
Old 10-20-2017, 11:24 AM
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I am a skeptic of Enerburn and most fuel additives. However as I previously stated, the ingredients of Enerburn have been scientifically studied and there may be some validity. I have been using it at the recommended dosing for the last several tanks of fuel.

Prior to using it, my average miles between regenerations was reported by the PCM through Forscan was 274 miles. The first regen running on all Enerburn treated fuel was at 423 miles. DPF gage said full but Forscan said 65%, g/l 2.16, well below the usual (typically has been 130% and 3.6 g/l). The regen burned down to 15% on the dash gage (lower than the usual 20-25%) and 0.86 g/l on Forscan (lower than the typical 1). Second regen on Enerburn was at 440 miles, will need to pull all the numbers from the saved Forscan log but they were similar. This time burned down to 10% on the dash gage, first time that has happened.

I do not pull a trailer often, most of this driving was with the large camper on the back - not as heavy a load as a big 5th wheel but still a bit of a load.

The very first regen when the truck was new was at 500 miles. Since then around 300 miles and sometimes less. With Enerburn so far, well over 400 miles. The mpg has not changed (not enough to separate from normal variability anyway). My qualitative observation (always suspect) is that the low load build up of soot is similar of perhaps a little slower, but the higher load build up is somewhat slower and passive regen seeming to occur at a bit lower temp and proceed a bit faster. So it may help more in towing or loaded situations compared to empty commuting type driving. I'll be doing a little more unloaded freeway work in the next couple of months so I'll get more data.

My main complaint so far (beyond the cost) is that the bottle cap does not seal well, and makes the cab stink if I keep it inside.
 
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  #67  
Old 10-20-2017, 10:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Brandon606 View Post
I have a question. This is the first time I have pulled since getting the Edge CTS. Started at 3.7 GPL soot and about 43%, 2 hour tow, the GPL continued up to 5.6 but continually dropped down to 27% on DPF. I figured the GPL would drop with the DPF % but did not. Is that normal? Exhaust temps were in the 700ís through 900 majority of the trip so I figured it was hot enough to be cooking it off.
Have you connected your CTS to a PC and updated it? My DPF Load and GPL move up and down together. Most of us see regens start with about 3.45-3.60 GPL.
 
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  #68  
Old 10-21-2017, 07:32 AM
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Originally Posted by SkiSmuggs View Post
Have you connected your CTS to a PC and updated it? My DPF Load and GPL move up and down together. Most of us see regens start with about 3.45-3.60 GPL.
I have not updated it, will give it a try. My regens are anywhere from 5.7 GPL to as high as 7.2, which I thought sounded high.
 
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  #69  
Old 10-25-2017, 06:57 PM
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Ok SkiSmuggs, I updated the CTS2 with no change in readings from pre-update. My truck is a 2017 f250 6.7. From day 1 it has regenned anywhere from 5.1 to as high as in the 7ís on the GPL, but it is always at 100% on dpf load. Once regen starts the exhaust temps rise and the GPL will fall until it reaches anywhere from .5 to 1.5 and about 5% on dpf load. Has done this for several thousand miles. I towed the fifth wheel this weekend, exhaust temps in the 750-850 range, dpf % dropped but GPL climbed, got home I was at 30% dpf load and 8.5 GPL, never saw it that high. Next day coming home from work its around 33% and starts a regen, drops to 4% load and about 2.6 GPL. That was Monday, it is now at 3.6 GPL and the dpf is creeping up to 6% which is way out of the norm, usually gains about 4% a day or more. I am thoroughly confused but I hope I havent confused you, any thoughts? Maybe the 17ís have a higher threshold for soot, it is not predicatable at all by the GPL but is like clockwork on the dpf% however since the tow it is moving at a snails pace. The Duramax I had before was predictable by the GPL and behaved accordingly with both dropping as you towed but this truck is all over the place.
 
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Old 10-25-2017, 07:12 PM
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One of two things: The 2017 truck has different operating parameters and/or the CTS is receiving info that it doesn't understand because it is different than what it got from the 2011-2016 models. You could ask Edge about it, or you could just learn what is normal for your truck.
 
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Old 10-25-2017, 07:16 PM
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Originally Posted by SkiSmuggs View Post
One of two things: The 2017 truck has different operating parameters and/or the CTS is receiving info that it doesn't understand because it is different than what it got from the 2011-2016 models. You could ask Edge about it, or you could just learn what is normal for your truck.
I will give Edge a call tomorrow and see what they say. May start a post in the 17 forum too and see if anyone else is seeing the same numbers, thank you and sorry to get your thread off track.
 
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Old 10-27-2017, 04:56 AM
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I've read this whole thread...its kind of interesting. I guess the question I have is...why?

You guys are talking about adding this Enerburn, Opti-Lube, Archoil, PM22...what are you gaining? There will be folks that run nothing but straight diesel for the life of their engine and get several hundred thousand miles out of it.

Ford *knows* ULSD doesn't have the lubricity of previous fuels. They *know* 40 cetane is common around the country. And they design the engine, fuel system, and emission system based on that knowledge.

Perhaps you get a longer regen interval. Who cares? With the money you're spending on additives, I doubt you're really gaining.

Sorry to be a naysayer.
 
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Old 10-27-2017, 07:40 AM
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Ford has a video on the poor quality of American diesel fuel that says PM22 is a good idea. I see folks at the service desk who are really upset, with the problems they are having with their trucks and DPF issues. I have 47,000 miles without issue.
I did a lot of research before buying my truck and concluded that soot was an issue and that it could be reduced. Maybe I am only gaining piece of mind, but I am learning what works and what doesn't. While some folks spend thousands on lifts, wheels and tires, I spend $100 or so a year for what my research indicates are the best fuel improvers available and have no problems with my truck. What I hope to be gaining is 300,000 trouble free miles without turbo, EGR or DPF issues.
 
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Old 10-27-2017, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by troverman View Post
I've read this whole thread...its kind of interesting. I guess the question I have is...why?

Sorry to be a naysayer.
There are three advantage I can see in additives:

1) improve lubricity. It is true Ford did their best to design the motor for ULSD, but the manufacturer of the pump (Bosch) recommends higher lubricity fuel than what's available. This could save the rare early failure or extend the service life more commonly.

2) improve Cetane. In areas where fuel is at the low end, this could make the engine run smoother and quieter, and perhaps more economically.

3) reduce soot. This could extend the life of the DPF, but also other components affected by soot (which is practically the whole engine in one way or another). While regens are directly damaging to the motor, dumping in twice the fuel and heating things to 1100 degrees routinely isn't good for it either.

It's hard to say in any of these whether the benefit is worth the hassle and expense. Ford and the fuel suppliers don't think so or it would come that way. On the other hand, if you are after absolute economy, you could change the oil only every 50,000 miles. I'll bet the truck would still run 200,000, though you might not want to keep it much longer. So each of us makes choices on how much to care for their vehicle.

I'll do #1 since I don't think it can hurt anything though any benefit is not directly observable. I drive mostly in California so #2 is unnecessary. I'm experimenting with #3 and so far like the idea that regens happen about 30% less often.
 
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  #75  
Old 10-27-2017, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by troverman View Post
I've read this whole thread...its kind of interesting. I guess the question I have is...why?

You guys are talking about adding this Enerburn, Opti-Lube, Archoil, PM22...what are you gaining?

Sorry to be a naysayer.

I am using the additive of my choice, K-100, for peace of mind. The very process to make our current fuel ULSD makes the fuel's ability to absorb moisture increase. ULSD is a 90 day fuel from what I've read. By taking the sulfur out of the fuel, it is not as lubricating as it once was. I use my additive to add lubrication to my fuel.


I also use my additive to take care of moisture problems. Yes, I know, that our trucks have a primary fuel filter (DFCM) that has a drain on it and that I could drain it at times. But my belief in my additive takes care of that for me.


I double the dose in the winter time to take care of potential gelling problems with my fuel.


My additive also increases cetane by 1.5 to 2 points. It also has a cleaner in it.


This is WHY I use my additive. I don't trust the crappy fuel we have to now use with our modern diesel engines. And it gives me peace of mind.


Just because Ford designed the 6.7 engine around the ULSD does not make the fuel system moisture proof or the components in it to not require proper lubrication.


Enough said...
 
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