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Gas in a 2016 6.7L Powerstroke

 
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Old 11-30-2016, 09:25 AM
bigdo1
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Gas in a 2016 6.7L Powerstroke

I was so paranoid about this, and it actually happened. Such a bonehead - I'd like to blame someone else, but at the end of the day, I've got no one to blame but myself.

I've got a 2016 F-250 w/ a 6.7L Powerstoke. 16.5K miles. I'm from Texas, and I'm coming home from a Thanksgiving trip in South Carolina. Filled up with what I thought was diesel - green handled pump at a BP station, about 10 gallons. I thought for sure when I ran my credit card, I pushed the button that said "diesel". All summer long, every diesel pump has had a green handle...

A few miles down the road, the truck felt a little funny. Kind of jerky, like you are on a bumpy road. After about 10 miles we stopped to eat, came out, and the truck was very hard to start. I got it started, and after a few minutes on the highway, lost power, but truck would still idle. We limped off the highway to the next exit and called a tow truck, towed it to the nearest Ford dealer. It was Saturday, so we had to spend two nights in Georgia and wait for the prognosis.

My worst fears are realized - gas in the fuel tank. I called the BP - 'your diesel pumps are spitting out gas' I accused. The manager asked if I used the green handled pump - I said 'of course, that's diesel'. He replied that BP doesn't use green for diesel, they use green for gas. ****... I'm still sure I pressed the 'diesel' button after I ran my credit card - I guess I didn't.

The dealership dropped my fuel tank, emptied and cleaned it and changed the fuel filters. Cleaned out my fuel lines. Filled it back up with diesel, all seemed good. We resumed our trip to Texas Monday night about 6pm, drove all night, running through about 3 full tanks of diesel. The truck doesn't seem worse for the wear - starts now just fine, runs smooth as silk, sounds exactly like it did before my bonehead move, and seems to have all the power it had for the first 16.5K miles.

Of course, I worried myself sick reading about this on the Internet. I could have long-term damage that would necessitate replacing the fuel system to the tune of some $12,000. Injectors might be fine now, but could go belly up somewhere down the road. Blah, blah, blah. I guess time will tell, but I think I dodged a bullet for now. I pull at 27' travel trailer with the truck, so we'll see how it goes. I'm just glad we were not pulling the trailer when this happened.

So driver beware. I'm super paranoid about it now, to the point of being almost ridiculous. I've being going through all of the scenarios where this could have turned out worse, so I consider myself lucky!
 
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Old 11-30-2016, 09:42 AM
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Yup!! I have seen green handle gas hoses..........so, with this, here is my routine.
NO DISTRACTIONS WHILE FUELING!!!!!!

1. See if there is a "Diesel only" pump. If so, use it.
2.if a shared pump, check for a slimy handle; if it isn't slimy, do a double check
3. I always do a quick "sniff test" (even at the "Diesel only pumps)....if it smells gassy.........no further explanation necessary.

The only time I look for color is when driving into the station and looking at the pumps!

Hope nothing long term has happened, Good luck.

PS. Having been in various aspects of the petroleum industry all my adult working life, I have seen a few screwups by transport drivers........had their head in their azz and got gas in the diesel tank, so this is why the "sniff test"!!
 
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Old 11-30-2016, 10:47 AM
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Originally Posted by bigdo1 View Post

Of course, I worried myself sick reading about this on the Internet. I could have long-term damage that would necessitate replacing the fuel system to the tune of some $12,000. Injectors might be fine now, but could go belly up somewhere down the road. Blah, blah, blah.
Some members here have traded their trucks after having this experience. You will never know what damage has been done until you get down the road.

Thank you for sharing this story. I tend to fill-up at a few places and also check and re-check before starting. My wife always jokes that it's more likely that her Ford Escape will be filled with Diesel than my truck getting filled with gas. She may be correct.

bruce....
 
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Old 11-30-2016, 10:54 AM
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You should be fine. Friend of my son did the same thing and my son pumped the fuel out of the tank, changed the fuel filters and refilled with diesel. The truck ran fine for many kms after that until it was eventually traded on a new one.
 
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Old 11-30-2016, 11:51 AM
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Yes...I hate BP stations for that reason. Why can't GREEN be the standard across the US for diesel. That annoys me, just about as much as the red or green button for credit when using credit cards in stores. Why is every place different? Either standardize on the Red X or the Green O. Annoying as hell.
 
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Old 11-30-2016, 01:42 PM
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wow things to think about

1 sell and go 17 only thing it's been reported gas removed from tank on fords net work :-(
any dealer will pull records on that truck i would before buying it.

2 replace just the HPFP before it grenades the motor which will happen then it gets
expensive fast

3 their is no way it did not kill that pump sorry for the bad news. i do not care what any one
say's a little water and then die never mined gas going threw it. many years ago i did
that to my 7.3 no big deal but , not a 6.7 high presser rail fuel system trust me what ever
it coast to replace that pump is cheaper then the whole system all the lines and each
injector when it explodes and sends steel down stream to motor.


lets put it this way if you were buying a used 2016 50 thousand dollar plus truck wouldn't you look at the records?
 
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Old 11-30-2016, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by radium View Post

2 replace just the HPFP before it grenades the motor which will happen then it gets
expensive fast

3 their is no way it did not kill that pump sorry for the bad news. i do not care what any one
say's a little water and then die never mined gas going threw it. many years ago i did
that to my 7.3 no big deal but , not a 6.7 high presser rail fuel system trust me what ever
it coast to replace that pump is cheaper then the whole system all the lines and each
injector when it explodes and sends steel down stream to motor.


lets put it this way if you were buying a used 2016 50 thousand dollar plus truck wouldn't you look at the records?
Hello Radium - what do you base your response on - are you a certified Ford/diesel mechanic? Or have you seen this type of think occur on a late-model 6.7L Powerstroke?

Why/how would the HPFP grenade the motor? What damage did the it take from the gas exposure, and why wouldn't any affects show now?

You say there's no way that it didn't kill the pump. Again, what do you base this on? If it killed the pump, how did I drive the truck another 800+ miles with no seemingly ill affects?

I'm not disputing what you say, just trying to understand.
 
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Old 11-30-2016, 02:04 PM
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Originally Posted by 06greenstroker View Post
Yes...I hate BP stations for that reason. Why can't GREEN be the standard across the US for diesel.
Funny, up here, most of the diesel pumps have yellow handles and gasoline handles are black.

As for the situation at hand...well, I'd be wary. You have to understand the fuel system. Fuel tank, lift pump, lines...they're all fine. First stop is the HPFP. The pistons in the pump are lubricated by diesel fuel. Although ULSD doesn't lubricate as well as diesel of yesteryear, it still lubricates. Gasoline is a solvent / cleaner which removes lubrication. So, that's bad. However, you have two things going for you: in 2015, the CP4.2 pump became more robust and including a special coating on the pistons which aids lubrication. The other thing is that you still had some diesel in the tank, and so it was not straight gasoline...instead it was a mix of sorts. So, in my opinion, the pump could last a long time in the future, but it's lifespan was probably shortened. After the pump, there are a couple of valves - pressure control vs volume control - but I think they will be fine unless gasoline eats their seals. If it did, you'd probably already be seeing the effects. I'm going to say fine. Finally, you have the injectors themselves. These, I'd worry less about. They could fail, as the gasoline could cause problems with the many complexities of an EHI, but short of pieces of the injector breaking off into the engine, just replace if they fail.

My advice would be to take the preventative step of replacing the HPFP.
 
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Old 11-30-2016, 03:46 PM
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stay away from BP...period.
 
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Old 11-30-2016, 05:53 PM
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Did that at a BP about 200k ago in my 7.3. Drained the tank and put in some 2 stroke haha. Still going strong but doesn't get many miles since I got the 6.7. Avoid BP to the day.
 
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Old 12-01-2016, 12:22 AM
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Originally Posted by troverman View Post
Funny, up here, most of the diesel pumps have yellow handles and gasoline handles are black.

As for the situation at hand...well, I'd be wary. You have to understand the fuel system. Fuel tank, lift pump, lines...they're all fine. First stop is the HPFP. The pistons in the pump are lubricated by diesel fuel. Although ULSD doesn't lubricate as well as diesel of yesteryear, it still lubricates. Gasoline is a solvent / cleaner which removes lubrication. So, that's bad. However, you have two things going for you: in 2015, the CP4.2 pump became more robust and including a special coating on the pistons which aids lubrication. The other thing is that you still had some diesel in the tank, and so it was not straight gasoline...instead it was a mix of sorts. So, in my opinion, the pump could last a long time in the future, but it's lifespan was probably shortened. After the pump, there are a couple of valves - pressure control vs volume control - but I think they will be fine unless gasoline eats their seals. If it did, you'd probably already be seeing the effects. I'm going to say fine. Finally, you have the injectors themselves. These, I'd worry less about. They could fail, as the gasoline could cause problems with the many complexities of an EHI, but short of pieces of the injector breaking off into the engine, just replace if they fail.

My advice would be to take the preventative step of replacing the HPFP.
Great response/advice - thanks!
 
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Old 12-01-2016, 06:08 AM
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I make a habit to always smell whatever i am pumping a few times
 
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Old 12-01-2016, 08:37 AM
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I am fully aware of the Green Gas Pump nozzle skirts at BP, and for that reason I usually avoid that brand unless I'm really low on fuel and there are no other Diesel stations nearby. I could see myself doing the same thing in a moment of inattention. While the color Green is used to indicate Diesel at most other locations, I don't know why BP continues to uses it on the Gas Nozzles.
 
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Old 12-01-2016, 10:41 AM
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Sorry I couldn't get back working nights. I've been around diesels for 48 years as I stated my old Powerstroke 7.3 had a few tanks of gas go through it not the same engin at all compared to the 6.7. In the 50s we would cut diesel for winter with gas but today's high presure engines that's a no no. ultra low sulfur fuel is the lubricant for the pumps as was stated above, You have to be hypercritical of water even a minimal amount of water on a high pressure fuel rail system will be devastating, as far as putting gas in that's another whole step. There's a coating on that pump it's just there for the ultra low sulfur fuel issue not to stand up to gasoline or water sorry just being honest with you . On a quick side note when Chevy and Ford start using this new HPFP 4.2 there were plenty of failures at first Bosch did not realize American fuel lack lubricity compared with European or Canada fuel. This is why Ford develop that new coating for the new pumps however once again that was just for the lack of the fuel not for protecting from water or gas or exhaust fluid which is another common mistake accidently put in the tank. Change out that pump you don't want it grenading the motor that means shrapnel flying down all those lines then it's well over 14 Grand to fix. This is why I was listing some options I'm not making a moral judgment on you but, a lot of people would just trade the truck off and not say a word. So at the end of the day you have to ask yourself am I willing to take my chances and hope it never happens during ownership and pass the buck which unfortunately now thanks to Carfax and your dealers report is listed gas removed from diesel tank. I personally would have it scheduled to have the pump replaced which will help with your warranty and resale value the other minor parts of the fuel system are very cheap compared to the HPFP as was stated earlier if an injector goes bad one or two it's a lot cheaper and less destructive than that fuel pump. You could possibly get the pump installed outside of your dealer cheaper try to find a good diesel mechanic. I personally would just go to my dealer I have a 35 year history with him as a matter of fact I went to school with him, I tell him he used to beat me up on the playground and now he beats up my wallet :-) . I hope everything works out for you just chalk it up to a lesson learned and don't beat yourself up too bad we've all done it and as I get older I'll probably do it again LOL. take care
 
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Old 12-01-2016, 10:52 AM
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I've heard a rumor that if you accidentally put gas in your tank you can add motor oil to the tank to prevent damage. Any truth to that?

Rob
 

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