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1976 highboy leans to drivers side

 
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Old 02-14-2016, 01:52 PM
jim4
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1976 highboy leans to drivers side

I have a 1976 highboy f250. When I bought it the guy gave me a set of front leaf springs with it. My truck leans to drivers side in the front it's 1.5 inches and in back its 1.75 inches different than passenger side. I look at all the suspension and it all looks the same. Bushings are old, but all brackets, shocks, perches, everything looks the same on both sides of truck. I can't see where the difference is. Must be in the leaf spring, but would that make it lean front and back too? Another thing, if I jack it up it sits level until I drive it. And the. It picks up lean again. Any ideas???????
 
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Old 02-14-2016, 02:06 PM
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Sounds like a worn, sprung (from being over loaded) or possible a broken leaf spring? Insp them real well where they set on the axle pad and where the u bolts are. Along the side of the leaf spring, looks for cracks. Where the red lines are....

How long you think this guys u bolts were loose? Wonder what happened to the leaf spring pack center bolt? As cheap fix for a settling leaf pack, if nothing is broken, can be an add-a leaf.
 
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Old 02-15-2016, 02:32 AM
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I will look for cracks, but the truck tracks true down the road and not making any weird noises. I do have new springs, but before I change them out just want to zero in on the problem. Is there a way to measure spring curve? Or in other words, tell if they are worn out? All the parts seem tight with no funny wear marks. Thanks for the info so far
 
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Old 02-15-2016, 09:28 AM
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To measure the spring curve you have to have the spring unloaded (really the best way to do this is with the spring completely removed) and measure eye to eye distance.

Reinsp the schackle bushings, and all bolt thru connections for wear. But I bet it is just worn out springs.
 
 
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