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Replacing the Oil Pan Gasket on my '84 351W

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Old 02-05-2016, 10:41 PM
kr98664 kr98664 is online now
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Replacing the Oil Pan Gasket on my '84 351W

Call it just a hunch, but I highly suspect the wife of a Ford engineer ran off with a mechanic. She must have been quite a catch, as this forlorn engineer wildly succeeded when he plotted his revenge. This guy, you see, designed the frame on our Ford trucks, and put the front crossmember directly under the engine oil pan. I've dropped my share of oil pans on a wide variety of vehicles. It's a simple job, with one notable exception: Anything with a blue oval.

For access, your choices are simple. Remove the engine. Or undo the motor mounts and tip up the engine a few inches for clearance with the crossmember. I went with the latter. It's your choice. Read on and decide for yourself. The subject vehicle is my '84 F250 Supercab 4x4 (8600 GVW), with a 351W and T-18 four-speed transmission. Other models and years may be different, but hopefully the general principles are the same.

Please note this isn't exactly step-by-step instructions. It's more like general observations and lessons learned for anybody interested in doing the same job. I had great intentions to include a slew of pictures, but let's just say Auto-Focus let me down. Perhaps it should be called Ought-To-Focus. There's no way I'm doing this job again simply to get better pictures.

The oil pan gasket had a leak. That may not be the most accurate description. As the owner of a British car might say, the engine was applying self-renewing rustproofing to the underbody. I had the timing cover off about a year ago, which required splicing in a new section of the oil pan gasket. That seam eventually failed. The timing chain throws oil right in that area, so the leak kept getting worse. When I could no longer jump across the puddle of oil on the driveway (a running start is okay), it was time to replace the entire oil pan gasket.

Please note this write-up is only applicable to the small-block V8. For the same in-frame process on the straight 6, please see this article, although some of my suggestions are still applicable:

https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/1...aight-six.html

As best I can determine, Ford did NOT recommend the in-vehicle process on the large-block V8 in a pickup. The factory manual doesn't specifically say you can't, but it looks that way when reading between the lines. The manual does provide details for all engines in E-series vans. However, for F-series pickups, only the straight 6 and small-block V8 engines are covered, which leads me to believe they didn't recommend this for the large-block V8. The following thread has details on how difficult the process was on the much larger 460. It started out with a rear main seal replacement, but progressed to having to drop the oil pan. The thread included the infamous statement (gently paraphrased) "I will let the thing leak and start itself on fire before I ever attempt this again with the engine in the vehicle.". Although this job wasn't fun on my 351W, I can honestly say I never wished I'd purchased highway flares instead:

https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/1...on-pulled.html

Here's a rundown of the steps you'll need to do. Please note some of these steps also apply to removing the engine, if you're calculating which approach is easier. I had a case of "While I'm in there" and replaced the oil pump and pump driveshaft, too. Even if not replacing the oil pump, in my experience it had to be removed to get the pan free. Depending how high you can lift the engine, you might be able to leave the pump installed. Despite what you may have heard, it wasn't that big a deal to remove and install the oil pump, so don't let that scare you.

The following link reports being able to replace the oil pan gasket without raising the engine, but I don't recommend that. This was on a 5.0 V8 in a '94 truck, but the general principles should be similar. If removing an original style cork or paper gasket, expect it to come off in brittle little pieces. No matter how careful you are, some crud will drop into the pan and be difficult to find and remove. Plus, you'll have a miserable time getting both mating surfaces prepped. In theory you could do everything with such limited clearance, but I wanted to make sure I got the innards plenty clean and didn't want to do this job twice.

https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/1...asket-fix.html

I have a well equipped shop, except for one little detail. My big 1984 truck won't fit in my compact 1937 garage, so I had to do all the work outside. At the very minimum, you will need a hard, flat surface. Put down a sheet of heavy cardboard as this is a messy job. If you need to replace the oil pan gasket, most likely the pan and frame are already an oily mess. Make your life a little easier and visit your local coin-operated car wash. Spray off as much oily crud as you can to make the job less unpleasant.

In addition to standard tools, here are some recommended items to have:

Creeper

Mechanic's head lamp

Assortment of wooden blocks (cribbing under the bottle jack)

1/4" drive swivel sockets

Assortment of 1/4" drive extensions

1/4" drive air ratchet

Torque wrench reading down to 10 ft-lbs.

Tie rod separator tool (if jacking up engine from the front)

Box of mechanic's disposable gloves

Large assortment of professional-grade foul language

To lift up the engine, you've got three ways you can do it. No matter which method you use, you'll set wooden blocks between the motor mounts and the frame, and then rest the engine back down. More on the blocks later, which you'll want to have ready ahead of time.

The easiest way to raise the engine is with a cherry picker or some other type of hoist from above. Use the factory specified lifting points to attach the hoist chain. I don't have a hoist and although this would be a perfectly good excuse to buy yet another tool, I did not use this method.

Another option is to use a jack under the harmonic balancer at the front of the crankshaft. In the edge of a wood block, cut a radius to match the harmonic balancer. I recommend using a bottle jack, not a floor jack. A bottle jack lifts straight up, while a floor jack must roll forward as the pad is raised. If the wheels meet any resistance, this could spit out the wooden block. To help keep the block centered on the bottle jack, drill a matching shallow hole on the bottom of the block. Lots of cribbing blocks will be required under the jack, as the crankshaft sits up a fair distance from the ground. With this method, you'll need to undo the steering tie rod, as this passes directly underneath the harmonic balancer. A tie rod separator tool is the right tool for the job, but fortunately one isn't expensive. No steering adjustments will be disturbed, so a front-end alignment will not be needed.

I went with the third method, a bottle jack under the rear section of the oil pan. If using this method, make sure the pan is structurally sound, as these pans are prone to rust-through, especially in the "from" states using road salt. Even if you live a pleasant "to" state like I do, give the pan a good visual inspection to be sure. To spread out the load, I used a thick 6" x 8" wood block. In the center of the bottom of the block, I drilled a shallow hole to locate the tip of the bottle jack. On top of the block, I set a thick block of Styrofoam as a crush layer. The Styrofoam smashed down perfectly to match the pan contour and supported it securely.

Fortunately, I still had the original packaging from my circa 1989 VCR. Since I probably wasn't going to be returning my VCR any time soon, I decided I could at least put one of the chunks of foam to good use. I saw no signs of distortion in the pan lifting the engine this way. Here's a blurry shot from behind showing the jack, block of wood, and Styrofoam crush layer under the oil pan.





No matter which method you use to raise the motor, I recommend lifting the front of the truck a few inches and resting the frame on jack stands. I didn't think of this until the job was completed and it could have saved a lot of aggravation. First, this will give you extra clearance under the crossmember to move back and forth on your creeper, instead of having to go around.

More importantly, as you start lifting the weight of the motor, the suspension will unload and raise the frame. This reduces the effective amount of travel from your jack. I had to make the lift in several bites, alternately raising the motor, setting it back down on partial thickness blocks, adding more cribbing under the jack, and repeating the process with thicker blocks under the motor mounts, and so on. In retrospect, it would have been MUCH easier if the frame was stationary up on jack stands.

Here's a picture of one of the blocks I inserted between the motor mount and frame. It's a 4" long piece of 2x4 (actual dimensions 1.5" thick x 3.5" wide). To clear the stud that hangs down from the motor mount, I cut a slot in the center of each block. Because the perches on the frame are tilted down at a 45 degree angle, put the closed end of the slot at the top to keep the block from sliding off. The slot is 3/4" wide and 3" long. The exact dimensions are not critical, but don't make the blocks too long or they will interfere with removing the oil pan. I also made some thinner blocks from 3/4" plywood, not shown.





My original plan was to stack a series of thinner blocks as I went, but this was too difficult due to the slope of the perches and the fact that I only have two hands. Instead, I would suggest taping or nailing the blocks together to the desired thickness ahead of time. (I also added magnetic tape on the bottom of the stack to help keep everything from sliding off while unloaded.) Stagger the blocks in stairstep fashion because they will be installed at a 45 degree angle, and you want the maximum bearing surface available in a vertical line to support the engine weight. The maximum stack thickness I was able to fit was 2.25", which works out to about 3" of vertical lift. Unfortunately, because of the way the oil pump hangs down, this 3" wasn't quite enough to remove the pan without detaching the pump, but we're getting ahead of ourselves.

With your blocks and lifting equipment ready to go, let's get started.

Make sure the rubber mount under the transmission/transfer case is in good condition. When you unbolt the motor mounts from the frame and raise the engine, this aft mount is all that keeps the motor from tipping to either side. Keep in mind the engine/transmission/transfer case combination sits as a unit like a tripod on three mounts: The two in front (which will be undone) and the single aft mount. There's no need to loosen the aft mount, as it will flex enough to let you tip up the front of the engine.

Disconnect the ground cable on the battery.

Remove the air cleaner. If working outside like me, cover the carb throat with a plastic bag and secure it with a rubber band. Even with the hood closed, rain could collect there.

Drain the engine oil. Let it drain overnight, if possible. Reinstall the plug. Be aware when you tip up the engine, some oil sitting on flat internal surfaces (such as the cylinder heads and lifter valley) will now run aft and drain down into the pan. Expect to have at least another cup of oil collect in the pan. If using a bottle jack and block under the pan, don't do like I did and leave out the plug, thinking there was no more oil. The Styrofoam block will easily fit around the protruding plug. Having the plug installed will save you a lot of mess.

If equipped with power steering, loosen the drive belt and let the pump hang down. This will provide slack for the pressure hose between the pump and steering gearbox. Also remove the two bolts securing the curlycue cooling line on the front of the crossmember. This lets the rigid line float and will provide slack for the flexible return line.

Release the fuel line from the plastic clip on top of the crossmember on the driver's side. Looking from the front, this clip is several inches below the oil filter, next to the oil pan.

Remove the dipstick. If the dipstick passes through the side of the pan, you must also remove the dipstick tube. The top of the tube is secured to one of the exhaust manifold fasteners. The bottom of the tube secures to the pan with a 5/8" flare nut, like an oversized brake line. This nut was partially seized to the pan and gave me fits on removal. Use a flare nut wrench for a good grip. If you can't break the nut loose, cut the tube and worry about it later once the pan is removed. You should then be able to get a socket on there for removal and you can replace the entire tube assembly.

Remove the two bolts at the top of the radiator fan shroud. Lift up the shroud to release it from the clips at the bottom. Move the shroud aft and rest it on the fan. Be careful when you set the engine back down because the shroud could get caught and crush the radiator.

Undo the exhaust pipes from the exhaust manifolds. When I raised the engine, the aft end of the passenger side manifold was the first thing to hit the firewall. If I had removed that manifold, it might have helped give a little extra clearance.

On my truck, the exhaust crossover pipe (single exhaust) was fairly close to the rear of the oil pan. It was easy enough to unbolt the three exhaust hangers from the frame and slide the whole system aft for extra clearance.

If you have AC, watch the line between the compressor and condenser. It became another limiting factor for how high I could lift the engine. If I had unbolted the compressor, that would have given me more slack.

Your next step is to undo the two engine mounts from underneath the frame. Make one last check for any possible obstructions (such as aftermarket wiring) before slowly lifting the engine. The engine will rotate aft as everything pivots around the transmission mount, so pay attention to clearance behind the valve covers, etc. At first, lift the engine just enough to leave a small gap under the engine mounts. From above, try giving the engine a shake to make sure the engine is properly supported on the jack. As mentioned above, make sure you have the wooden blocks ready to go. As you continue raising the engine, keep your fingers clear of the gap between the mounts and the frame in case of any problems.

Insert the prefabricated stack of wooden blocks between the motor mounts and frame perches. Slowly lower the engine and make sure the blocks are secure and carrying the engine weight before unloading the jack a fraction of an inch. Once again, give the engine a good shake from above to make sure it is resting securely. Now you can get the jack out of the way. This would be a good time for a break, because as previously mentioned, additional oil will start collecting in the pan because the engine is tipped back.

While on break, visit the FTE forum and mention how you're in the middle of trying this procedure. Somebody will quickly chime in to chastise you for doing it the hard way instead of simply (hah!) pulling the engine.

Back from break, drain the last bit of oil from the pan before breaking the pan mounting bolts loose. For some of the bolts above the crossmember, a long extension and a 1/4" drive swivel socket works very well. Wrap the swivel with electrician's tape or heat shrink to keep the swivels from flopping around too much.

Carefully lower the pan and remove the oil pickup tube, working from the passenger's side. To give you an idea what to expect, this picture, purloined from HotRod.com, shows an upside down view of the engine with the oil pump and pickup tube installed. Two bolts near the front secure the pickup tube to the oil pump. These are easy to reach with a socket and extension. A nut, about halfway back, secures the middle of the pickup tube to the #3 main bearing cap on the passenger's side. This is approximately even with the aft edge of the motor mount. You'll need to use an open end wrench to reach this nut. The easiest way to access it is to lay on your back, feet towards the rear, with your head just behind the right front tire. Once the three fasteners are undone, you can easily snake the oil tube out from side of the pan.





At this point, my oil pan was still trapped by the oil pump itself hanging down. If you were lucky enough to get the engine a little higher than I was, you might be able to get the pan free now. In my case, with the pan trapped like this, removing the oil pump was no fun, but it wasn't the end of the world. There are just two bolts holding the pump to the bottom of the block. Drop the pump down slightly and pull it out from the front. Once you undo the pump, the pump driveshaft will fall down from above into the oil pan, but don't be alarmed. With the pump out of the way, the oil pan can now be removed towards the rear. Don't tip it, in case any extra oil collected again. Don't forget the pump driveshaft sitting in the bottom of the pan.

From here, you're looking at normal cleaning and preparation to get ready for the new gasket. Scrape off all traces of the old gasket from the bottom of the block and the flange on the oil pan. Make sure the bottom of the timing cover is flush with the bottom of the block. Also make sure the timing cover gasket is not protruding at the bottom, as this will interfere with a good seal at the oil pan.

A common problem is to find the oil pan flange indented around the bolt holes if the bolts were ever overtorqued trying to stop a leak. This is so important, I'll repeat myself: Make sure the flange is nice and straight, and flatten any distortion. Give the oil pan a good cleaning, etc. If I were to do this job again, I'd have probably ordered a new pickup tube. A lot of flotsam was caught on the pickup tube screen and it was slow going to clean it. A new pickup tube is cheap and it would have been a lot easier to simply replace it.

Use a Fel-Pro (or equivalent) one piece pan gasket. The gasket should come with snap-ups, which will save a LOT of grief trying to align the pan and gasket while starting the bolts. Place some newspaper on the top of the crossmember while getting the gasket situated. You'll have to let one end rest on the crossmember while getting the gasket started, and it's very important to keep it clean. With the snap-ups loosely holding the gasket to the bottom of the block, carefully work the gasket into the grooves at each end around the main bearing caps. Put the clean oil pan loosely in place, resting it on the crossmember, while you reinstall the oil pump and pickup tube.

If you did have to remove the oil pump (or are replacing it), it can be fun dealing with the pump driveshaft during installation. You'll need the shaft to hold itself up in place while you install the pump. Some people use a blob of heavy grease. I used super glue. (Once the engine is fired up, the glue bond will break so it's not permanent.) Note the snap ring on the driveshaft goes at the top. Prefill the pump with oil and turn it by hand a few times. I added a blob of grease at the side port (pickup tube connection) to make sure the oil didn't run back out. The grease will quickly get sucked in by the pump and won't cause any problems.

Now you're working inside the loose pan to install the pump. Not ideal, but it can be done. I think this part took me all of ten minutes. Inspired by the Old Man in Christmas Story, some precision use of foul language made the task much easier. Make sure your sockets lock securely onto your ratchet or extension while working inside the oil pan. This would be a bad time to have a socket come loose. Here's a picture to give you an idea what you'll be up against:





My engine didn't have a gasket between the pump and block, which made installation easier. With the drive shaft installed into the bottom of the distributor shaft and supporting itself (via grease, super glue, magic, etc.), make note which way the hex is oriented. Turn the pump drive socket to roughly prealign the two components. This will make it much easier when lifting the pump into place, since there isn't a lot of room to rotate it for alignment. After you get the first mount bolt loosely snugged, breath a sign of relief because you've got the worst part done. Install the second bolt and then tighten them both.

Move on to the oil pickup tube, loosely installing the two bolts into the side of the pump and the one nut at the #3 main bearing cap. A gasket is used between the tube and pump body. Hold it in place with grease while getting the bolts started and then tighten all three fasteners.

Now's the big moment, but it's almost anti-climactic. Raise the pan against the block and the snap-ups will hold it in place. Install all of the bolts hand tight and then torque them in a second pass. I couldn't find any offical sequence, so I started at the middle of each side and worked fore and aft. The torque is only 10 ft-lbs here, so use a torque wrench and resist the temptation to overdo it.

This would be a great time for another break. On a high from a tackling a tough job, check in again at the FTE forum to see how many people are calling you an idiot for doing the job this way. Dejected, head back out to your work area and get ready to lower the engine.

Make sure the radiator fan shroud is still sitting on the fan so it doesn't get trapped and damage the radiator. Raise the engine slightly, remove the wooden blocks, and slowly lower the engine. With any luck, the mounts will drop right into the slots in the frame. If not, you may have to persuade the engine fore or aft as needed. Once the engine is safely back down where it belongs, the rest is like a Chilton's manual (hiss): Assembly is the reverse of disassembly.

With everything put back together, fill the crankcase with fresh oil. To prime the oil system, crank the starter for about fifteen seconds without actually starting the engine. To do this, disconnect the center lead at the distributor cap and ground the lead. Don't worry, this will NOT hurt the coil, as it keeps the coil voltage from building too high. (In fact, you CAN damage the coil if you don't ground the lead. I know, it's sounds backwards. Just trust me, even though I'm not a real doctor nor do I even play one on TV.) Reconnect the lead to the distributor cap, fire up the engine, check for leaks, and then pat yourself on the back for a job well done. Just don't check FTE for a while. People will be discussing deficiencies in your ancestors' lineage for having done this job the "hard" way.

In retrospect, this job wasn't that bad. I've been giving the "pull the engine" camp a bad time, but it's all a matter of personal preference when deciding which route is quicker or easier. This first time went slowly for me as it was a learning process. It would have been a HUGE help to have the front of the frame steady, up on jack stands. The other important thing is to forget trying to individually stack the spacer blocks. Just have them ready ahead of time, nailed or taped together.

Remember, for a lot of us, there's a great psychological divide when it comes to pulling an engine. Right or wrong, the in-frame method seemed quicker and easier to me. As my beloved, prematurely gray-haired mother occasionally reminded me, "Everybody is entitled to their own opinion, no matter how ignorant or ill-informed they may be." I THINK she was talking about other people...

Last edited by kr98664; 02-07-2016 at 12:28 PM. Reason: Added summary
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Old 02-06-2016, 12:04 AM
joefritz25 joefritz25 is offline
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This is a great explanation. Thank you for detailing your procedure.

I put the same blue felpro oil pan gasket on my 351w in my 86 f250 4x4 but I didnt have to raise the engine or remove it. In fact, the only part I had to disconnect was the oil pan itself (as well as the dipstick tube).

I just dropped the pan a few inches and put the one piece oil pan gasket around the outside of the pan. Its flexible enough that it just goes around the outside of the pan without having to ever fish it around the crank and oil pump.

The only slight problem I had was that it was harder to scrape and clean the mating surface on the block. I held a piece of cardboard on and angle so that when I scraped, the piece of the old gasket would be directed outside the pan instead of landing inside the pan.

maybe your truck is different in some way where more room is required. I agree that the blue snap ups made life easier.

I have to do my rear main seal next. Maybe you can make a similar post if you do that job? Thanks again.
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Old 02-06-2016, 07:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joefritz25 View Post
This is a great explanation. Thank you for detailing your procedure.

I put the same blue felpro oil pan gasket on my 351w in my 86 f250 4x4 but I didnt have to raise the engine or remove it. In fact, the only part I had to disconnect was the oil pan itself (as well as the dipstick tube).

I just dropped the pan a few inches and put the one piece oil pan gasket around the outside of the pan. Its flexible enough that it just goes around the outside of the pan without having to ever fish it around the crank and oil pump.

The only slight problem I had was that it was harder to scrape and clean the mating surface on the block. I held a piece of cardboard on and angle so that when I scraped, the piece of the old gasket would be directed outside the pan instead of landing inside the pan.

maybe your truck is different in some way where more room is required. I agree that the blue snap ups made life easier.

I have to do my rear main seal next. Maybe you can make a similar post if you do that job? Thanks again.
Like he mentioned in his write-up, this is a very risky way to do it. If any old gasket falls into the pan it WILL get sucked up into the screen for the oil pump. We had a post a couple years ago where this did actually happen, and the guy wrote back in complaining he did not have any oil pressure. I would not do it unless you were totally confident you will not drop anything in the oil pan.
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Old 02-06-2016, 10:18 AM
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bruno2 bruno2 is offline
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Just pull the motor.
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Old 02-06-2016, 11:16 PM
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ctubutis ctubutis is offline
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Very entertaining, kr, thank you. I would rep you for that but need to spread the love.

I guess I would be one of the guys chastising you for doing it this way - that is because I did it this way once on my 1970 Mustang as a teenager and told myself "never again."
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Old 02-07-2016, 12:44 PM
kr98664 kr98664 is online now
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I guess I would be one of the guys chastising you for doing it this way - that is because I did it this way once on my 1970 Mustang as a teenager and told myself "never again."
Yeah, but how old is that memory? As the years rack up, old memories rapidly lose accuracy and typically become more extreme. For example, isn't everybody's first girlfriend remembered as being prettier than she really was? I'm not sure any of our memories can be trusted as strongly as you have vowed.

That's why I'm proposing, in the name of scientific research, of course, that you volunteer to help the next guy who needs to replace an oil pan gasket. Follow my suggestions in this thread. Do it for science. You might be pleasantly surprised.
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Old 02-07-2016, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by kr98664 View Post
Yeah, but how old is that memory? As the years rack up, old memories rapidly lose accuracy and typically become more extreme. For example, isn't everybody's first girlfriend remembered as being prettier than she really was? I'm not sure any of our memories can be trusted as strongly as you have vowed.

That's why I'm proposing, in the name of scientific research, of course, that you volunteer to help the next guy who needs to replace an oil pan gasket. Follow my suggestions in this thread. Do it for science. You might be pleasantly surprised.
Quite seriously, most of my reasoning for responding the way I do to those types of posts (e.g. changing oil pan gasket in-truck) is based on two presumptions:

1) Others who have been thinking of doing this themselves are also reading

2) Others who come across this thread while searching on how to do it will come across that thread

If you go surfing around the 'net reading up on others' experiences in doing this, many of the responses will be that way - describing the pain involved and advising to not do it that way. Cripe, even your instructions include foul language as one of the needed tools.

Sure, changing this stuff (oil pan, rear main seal) is doable with the engine in the truck and some people have no viable alternatives (you'll read stories out here about kids doing this kind of thing on gravel or dirt driveways) and so it becomes a decision of do it this way, or not do it at all.

As far as memories, well, the physical situations & restrictions haven't changed, but what would be different after 30 years is one's perception & tolerance of pain. How many times does one have to touch a hot stove before learning to not do that?

Not sure what you meant by offering to help others who do it this way, but that guy with the 460 who bitched & moaned for two weeks and said he'd let it catch itself on fire and burn to the ground lives ~75 miles south of me,down near Colorado Springs IIRC. Anyhow, I don't remember if i actually offered or not but I remember thinking to myself I could load up my compressor and some tools and head down there to help - but I never did actually go.
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Old 03-03-2016, 01:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Franklin2 View Post
Like he mentioned in his write-up, this is a very risky way to do it. If any old gasket falls into the pan it WILL get sucked up into the screen for the oil pump. We had a post a couple years ago where this did actually happen, and the guy wrote back in complaining he did not have any oil pressure. I would not do it unless you were totally confident you will not drop anything in the oil pan.
I didn't see the method I used mentioned in his write-up at all. Maybe I missed it. The method I used accomplished the same task with about 5% of the required effort and time with the only downside being you have to be careful.

Also, if you wanted to be really **** about making sure the inside of the oil pan contains no pieces of old gasket material, there are numerous extra steps you could take. For example, you could look in there using a flashlight and mirror, use compressed air or a shop vac, run a quart or two of oil through the engine before wrapping things up, etc.

I did none of these extra steps and my oil pan has zero leaks and my engine has been running great for years since doing this job that took me about an hour to do.

All said, I do appreciate the detailed, well thought-out, and cleverly written procedure by the OP.
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Old 03-03-2016, 04:45 PM
bcamill bcamill is offline
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You all may think I am weird, but I have three different size materials for this. I had my wife sew on some retractable material (Like a rubber band) on to the different size material to assist with keeping the oil pan clean for various vehicles. I have made good money from using them as I was able to undercut the other guy for the job.
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Old 03-03-2016, 06:24 PM
joefritz25 joefritz25 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bcamill View Post
You all may think I am weird, but I have three different size materials for this. I had my wife sew on some retractable material (Like a rubber band) on to the different size material to assist with keeping the oil pan clean for various vehicles. I have made good money from using them as I was able to undercut the other guy for the job.
I don't think you're weird. Could you please be more specific about which method you used and how the different sized material was used?

Did you raise the engine like the original poster or did you put the gasket around the outside of the pan without raising the engine like I did?
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Old 03-03-2016, 06:31 PM
bcamill bcamill is offline
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I do not raise the motor usually. That is why I use the material. I have different sizes for different vehicles. It is kind of like a shower hat that grandma would use. If I find I can get the gasket out of there by just lowering the pan, then I slip on the "shower cap" I made, and go at getting rid of the old gasket and cleaning the surface. I then blow the "shower cap" off with air and take it off carefully. There are times when I have had to raise the engine, but this helps when I do not.
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Old 03-03-2016, 07:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bcamill View Post
I do not raise the motor usually. That is why I use the material. I have different sizes for different vehicles. It is kind of like a shower hat that grandma would use. If I find I can get the gasket out of there by just lowering the pan, then I slip on the "shower cap" I made, and go at getting rid of the old gasket and cleaning the surface. I then blow the "shower cap" off with air and take it off carefully. There are times when I have had to raise the engine, but this helps when I do not.
What do you do when you have to scrape the pan rails? Your idea is a good one when you have to scrape the engine block.
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Old 03-03-2016, 10:14 PM
joefritz25 joefritz25 is offline
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I understand now. Thanks for the explanation. This is exactly what I did but instead of the shower cap I used a piece of cardboard on an angle to direct the piece of debris out of the pan instead of in.

For debris to be cleaned from the pan, I simply directed my scraping toward to outside of the pan instead of scraping into the pan, no cardboard needed.

I think my cardboard and your shower cap are very similar ideas with your shower cap being a bit more well thought out.
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Old 03-04-2016, 10:14 AM
bcamill bcamill is offline
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Sorry about that. I forgot the last step. With the "shower cap" as I call it clean. I simply push it into the pan. AQs it is larger it fills the bottom to catch the debris. Good results as I carefully remove it, but always check with the mirror and flashlight technique.
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Old 09-27-2016, 02:18 PM
Blockfort Blockfort is offline
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I could only lift my engine (96 f250 5.8) enough to get 1" spacer blocks. The transmission had some flanges that were hitting the underside of the truck body, and I had a few cables and hoses that were tight up against some AC lines and other things. Even with the oil pump unbolted, the oil pan was still caught on the front crank shaft bracket(?), so I had to clean the flange and install the gasket with the pan still stuck under the block. Slow painful work, but all done now.
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