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1957 - 1960 F100 & Larger F-Series Trucks Discuss the Box Style Ford Trucks

Buildup! '03 Crown Vic IFS into '58 F100

 
  #31  
Old 12-31-2011, 09:55 PM
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If you like the way it sits now just wait til you get the engine in.
 
  #32  
Old 01-01-2012, 12:06 AM
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Yeah it will probably drop a couple more inches I think. Now I just have to taper out the ends of the car frame and then I can connect the CV steering to my steering column. After that I can run my brake lines and then I can put the motor back in. I can't wait to drive it. Happy New Year!!
 
  #33  
Old 01-01-2012, 01:21 AM
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Well I put the pillow block put on just a few minutes ago. I think it looks much better than what I had on it before. I also made a piece for the brake pedal. It is rough but I feel like it will work terrifically. Here are some pictures.

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  #34  
Old 01-01-2012, 06:26 AM
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Weld the mount for the pillow block to the frame. The block has 2 mounting holes for a reason. You only have 1 attaching to the frame. This could lead to the mount spinning/moving. With either 2 bolts mounting it to the frame or welding it to the frame that possibility is removed.
 
  #35  
Old 01-01-2012, 01:44 PM
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I don't think it is going anywhere. The part that bolts to the pillow block has two bolts through it and, that piece is welded to the other piece which is bolted to the frame. All it is doing is stabilizing the steering shaft. I don't think it would go anywhere even if I wanted it to. I could be totally wrong though. But what about the brake pedal piece I made. Do you think it looks strong enough. It is made of 1/4 inch steel and a 1/2 inch square shaft welded together and bolted to the pedal along with the booster shaft. Keep in mind that I just made that to see if my idea would work or not. It probably is not permanent.
 
  #36  
Old 01-01-2012, 02:49 PM
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Ok regardless of how many bolts you have in the pillow block explain to me how you believe a piece mounted with a single point will not rotate on that point? I have no idea what you are attempting to build concerning the brake pedal.
 
  #37  
Old 01-01-2012, 09:18 PM
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Because the way the bracket is made the steering shaft would have to move either up or down for the bracket to rotate. It is tight and like I said the steering shaft won't have so much stress that it starts moving around in my opinion. Also I don't want to weld it to the frame because I may need to take it off sometime or move it. And as far as the brake pedal goes I said earlier how I moved the brake booster over to where the clutch would normally mount from the factory to avoid clearance issues in the future. So I made that piece so I could use the brake pedal in the stock location but leave the booster where the clutch master cylinder would go. Are you saying that the bracket I made for the steering shaft is going to be moving around since it is only mounted with one bolt? I just never thought that it would be that critical of an issue. Also I don't want to weld it yet because I won't know if it's in the right position or not until I put the motor in and get the steering linkage hooked up.
 
  #38  
Old 01-01-2012, 10:58 PM
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Mount it with 2 bolts if you do not want to weld it to the frame. The column will not keep the block from moving. A moving column was the reason to put the block in place. If it pivots on that single bolt the steering shaft will move either up or down. This will cause play in the wheel that is the very problem you are attempting to resolve.
 
  #39  
Old 01-02-2012, 06:33 PM
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The part that bolts to the frame is too short to put another bolt through. I think I will weld it to the frame once I get the motor in and know that everything has clearance. How did you mount the trailing arms? Does it matter what angle the bracket is on? I was thinking that if the angle is wrong it won't be able to be adjusted for alignment.
 
  #40  
Old 01-02-2012, 08:14 PM
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Originally Posted by fast58 View Post
The part that bolts to the frame is too short to put another bolt through. I think I will weld it to the frame once I get the motor in and know that everything has clearance. How did you mount the trailing arms? Does it matter what angle the bracket is on? I was thinking that if the angle is wrong it won't be able to be adjusted for alignment.
Loosen the nut on the end and spin the mount around so it is parallel with the ground. Make a plate that matches the top of the mount but leave a bit on the end so you can trim. The front is 3/4" below the rail and trim the rear so it just makes contact with the rail. Cut a piece 3/4" x the rail width and weld it in the front. Weld the back. I cut triangles and welded them to the side of the rail and the top of my mount. Load the suspension and tighten the nuts back up. The rear mount for the lower control arm has nothing to do with doing an alignment.
 
  #41  
Old 01-02-2012, 08:33 PM
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Okay that makes it a lot easier because I thought that they would loosen the trailing arm bolts and move it around to align it. If I don't have to have it on any particular angle then it goes from making a bracket to basically making a spacer between it and the frame. Mine doesn't look like it sits that far below the frame. Maybe it's the difference in the years of our trucks or maybe I'm wrong. But I have a large amount of 3/8 inch steel so I can just cut a piece that fits the mount on the trailing arm, drill the holes, and weld it to the frame. and if it does sit 3/4" below the frame then I can stack two pieces of 3/8" plates and weld them together.
 
  #42  
Old 01-02-2012, 09:56 PM
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It runs uphill. The front is the only portion that is 3/4" below the rail. The rear touches the rail unless there is something different with your frame. You want NO PRESSURE on the mount. Do not force/twist/turn it in any way. It needs to sit in position naturally.
 
  #43  
Old 01-03-2012, 10:18 PM
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I am working on some steering linkage now. I got a couple of steering universal joints at the local pick n' pull for $0.00. Can't beat that! So what I did today; I milled the inside of the u-joint so that I could use it with the CV linkage. I made it fit perfectly but as it turns out the CV linkage is not going to work. The only problem with this is that the nub that sticks out of the Rack and Pinion is very oddly shaped. The u-joints that I got have a square hole in them that the steering shaft goes into. Normally I would mill this out so it would fit, but the problem is that If I mill it to fit the CV steering "box" I don't think there will be enough metal on the U-joint to keep it from rounding out. Any suggestions?? I am thinking about combining the part that connects to the CV box with a regular steering u-joint but I don't know how I can keep the universal caps held in once I combine them.

This is a picture of the end of the CV linkage that I had to cut off to make it work with a regular u-joint. It is the exact same shape and size as the one on the steering box.
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  #44  
Old 01-04-2012, 12:25 PM
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I used the lower portion of the CV shaft with the unique u joint setup it has. I used a 3/4" straight connector that was splined inside on one end. I then pressed the splined end onto the CV shaft. It fits well enough that pressing it on will cut grooves for the teeth as you press it on. It is now on! I then welded it to the CV shaft. From that point up I used 3/4" stock welded to the coupler and the other end to a 3/4" u joint. The other end of the u joint is a 3/4" 36 spline which fits the end of my column perfectly. My column is much shorter than yours. Without actually being there to look at it all it is rough to make a recommendation for you but I would be using the lower portion of the CV shaft. You could cut it above the factory u joint at any point that helps you.
 
  #45  
Old 01-04-2012, 04:40 PM
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I did something similar to this. I took a u-joint from a ford car out of the local pick-n-pull. I milled the inside out to fit the stock CV shaft and my column. The problem is that the CV u-joint is almost worthless in my application and causes the steering to bind up in different places. So what I wanted to do is combine the lower portion of the CV linkage that attaches to the Rack and Pinion to another half of a regular u-joint.
 

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