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2010 F-150 Brake Problems

  #16  
Old 09-13-2011, 06:27 PM
BaitGuru
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I was looking for people with experience with BrakePerformance rotors and pads..
I had a set professionally installed::

1 x Premium Dimpled and Slotted Brake Rotors Rear Two Rotor Set (#RS-65085)
Promotion: Free Standard Semi Metallic Brake Pads (#PM-07110)

and hate them. I couldn't get someone to explain to me why less surfance area would improve braking (it's not like the pads are going to dip into every golf ball type dimple and increase the surface area). When I apply the brakes to slow down, it sounds like a bicycle wheel with a base-ball trading card clicking against the spokes.

The stopping performance has decreased (takes more foot pressure to come to a stop) and it takes longer to stop.

I got these, with the hope that it would improve my ability to stop my 4,000 lb Walk around boat (while towing). It doesn't!! I'm about to swap them out for a good pair of regular non slotted and not dimpled rotors from AutoZone.
 
  #17  
Old 09-13-2011, 08:45 PM
rhodeisland
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I advise to get original ford parts and especially avoid NAPA Chinese parts trust me I did that mistake only once.
 
  #18  
Old 09-13-2011, 09:14 PM
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Originally Posted by BaitGuru View Post
I was looking for people with experience with BrakePerformance rotors and pads..
I had a set professionally installed::

1 x Premium Dimpled and Slotted Brake Rotors Rear Two Rotor Set (#RS-65085)
Promotion: Free Standard Semi Metallic Brake Pads (#PM-07110)

and hate them. I couldn't get someone to explain to me why less surfance area would improve braking (it's not like the pads are going to dip into every golf ball type dimple and increase the surface area). When I apply the brakes to slow down, it sounds like a bicycle wheel with a base-ball trading card clicking against the spokes.

The stopping performance has decreased (takes more foot pressure to come to a stop) and it takes longer to stop.

I got these, with the hope that it would improve my ability to stop my 4,000 lb Walk around boat (while towing). It doesn't!! I'm about to swap them out for a good pair of regular non slotted and not dimpled rotors from AutoZone.
It really all boils down to the friction co-efficient....anything greater than .49 will be better than oem in terms of its ability to bite. I would avoid Wagner, Raybestos & any rotor from the chain stores...as they are all made at the same foundry in China (rotors/drums)

With regards to brake linings in gneral,
Ceramics: They are good but do not develop any more friction than good quality OEM linings

Performance Friction & Hawk: Good braking, increased friction but very dirty compared to OEM with the exception of VelveTouch- a line that Hawk just bought from Wellman Industries 2 years ago.

VelveTouch lining has been used for many decades and was the original lining used in all Shelby Mustangs in the 60’s (I personally have used the Velvetouch lining since 1960’s until brake lining production ceased in 1986), then switched to Carbo. Wellman has been the builder of braking linings for all of the Formula 1 race teams for more than 30 years.

CarboTech Engineering lining, which I have used for about 15+ years and been very happy on multiple full size (V8) cars and trucks. This particular lining has a high friction co-efficient, excellent pedal feel, wears (typically 50,000 to 75,000 miles before replacement is required) and produces less dust than OEM linings- but it is a crbon fiber based material...meaning it does show a little more on the wheels when compared to the same amount of brake dust as say an oem lining.

EBC also makes an excellent organic lining......almost dust free with excellent co-efficient.

I highly recommend speaking to them by phone for linings that would be best for your application.

With regards to rotors, I have previously run Brembo OEM replacement rotors that are cryogenically treated at Diversified Cryogenics, making them almost as hard as stainless steel- Applied Rotor Technology in California provides the same product. Unfortunately, Brembo, Powerslot, Raybestos, Bendix, Hawk etc. are all purchasing their rotors from the same foundary in China (with the exception of the $300 each composite high end units for Ferrari, Porsche, etc).

Both companies purchase the highest grade rotors made, laser mic them for quality, scrap the ones that are out of spec and cryogenically treat the good ones which are now as strong as stainless. They will also slot and cross drill the rotors for you. Their service, price and quality are excellent as well.

For street use, slotted/drilled rotors are just “cheese-graters” for the brake pads IMHO, because unless you are involved in true racing conditions, the brake linings do not produce the gases which slotted/drilled rotors are designed to relive. In some cases, brake testing indicated reduce brake efficiency in street-based operations using slotted/drilled rotors when equal comparisons were made. The staff at carbo can speak to you as well regarding those options, but I am very satisfied with the performance & wear of these products.
 
  #19  
Old 09-13-2011, 10:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Beechkid View Post
For street use, slotted/drilled rotors are just “cheese-graters” for the brake pads IMHO, because unless you are involved in true racing conditions, the brake linings do not produce the gases which slotted/drilled rotors are designed to relive. In some cases, brake testing indicated reduce brake efficiency in street-based operations using slotted/drilled rotors when equal comparisons were made. The staff at carbo can speak to you as well regarding those options, but I am very satisfied with the performance & wear of these products.
Pulling an RV would be a good reason 2 have cheese graters..... of which my F-250will soon get new ones...
 
  #20  
Old 09-14-2011, 10:51 AM
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Driving habits have a lot to do with brake wear. Most so than a lot of drivers may think. Have you ever seen those in front of you while driving that the brake light flash on and off frequently? I call them the left-footers. They seem to always be prepared to stop with their left foot slightly on the brake pedal. Little do they know, they are actually applying pressure on the brakes causing the rotors to heat up. Stop and go traffic can also be a contributing factor. It’s generally the uneven heating and cooling that causes rotors to warp.

Not to say there aren’t problems with quality issue with brake rotors on occasion. I’ve found that gradual slowing and releasing the brakes intermittently while slowing for a stop allows the brakes to cool more evenly. In 45 years of driving I’ve never had to have rotors turned or replaced because or warping.
 
  #21  
Old 09-14-2011, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Chinookman View Post
Pulling an RV would be a good reason 2 have cheese graters..... of which my F-250will soon get new ones...
Actually just the opposite....check out fire engines for example, GVW of 28,000 up to 68,000 (for aerial trucks) pounds, running disc brakes on all axles, no cheese graters on those...per mfg recommendations as well! The new police spec vehicles (spcifically Dodge & Ford- and even chev if you want to include the Tahoes), Ford is using a unique slotting pattern, very short, very shallow (a fraction of what is common) with no crossdrilling.

It literally serves no purpose no purpose in street applications except to provide bling.
 
  #22  
Old 09-14-2011, 11:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Beechkid View Post
Actually just the opposite....check out fire engines for example, GVW of 28,000 up to 68,000 (for aerial trucks) pounds, running disc brakes on all axles, no cheese graters on those...per mfg recommendations as well! The new police spec vehicles (spcifically Dodge & Ford- and even chev if you want to include the Tahoes), Ford is using a unique slotting pattern, very short, very shallow (a fraction of what is common) with no crossdrilling.

It literally serves no purpose no purpose in street applications except to provide bling.
I agree 100%. For those that are convinced they need more braking power, they should consider larger non-slotted or cross-drilled rotors.
 
  #23  
Old 09-14-2011, 09:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Beechkid View Post
Actually just the opposite....check out fire engines for example, GVW of 28,000 up to 68,000 (for aerial trucks) pounds, running disc brakes on all axles, no cheese graters on those...per mfg recommendations as well! The new police spec vehicles (spcifically Dodge & Ford- and even chev if you want to include the Tahoes), Ford is using a unique slotting pattern, very short, very shallow (a fraction of what is common) with no crossdrilling.

It literally serves no purpose no purpose in street applications except to provide bling.
maybe n the eyes of the beholder, cost is one reason why no graters on the rotors plus they are sized for that load. bling yep nuther reason..drilled nope will never support that, they can get fractures, shallow slots yep will go for that and many even like to send them off for cryo treatment....so it's really up to the owner ......... make your best informed decision and enjoy......the beaut of truck hobbies is u can take it to your limit....

.I'm done with my pop corn.....
 
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