2018 Ford F-150: Undisputed King of Fuel Economy

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Engineers of the 2018 F-150 didn’t rest until ‘best-in-class’ could be written ahead of ‘fuel economy’ and ‘gas mileage.’

How much do you pay for a gallon of fuel? Depending on where you live, that could range from $1.89 to over $4 bucks. Regardless of which tax bracket your yearly income lands you on, burning greenbacks is most likely not a good idea.

Consumers are commonly bombarded with terms like “all-new,” “segment-first,” and the ever popular “best-in-class.” Perhaps that’s why when companies like Ford make headlines like the one you see above, sometimes they’re not taken with the seriousness the automakers, engineers, and the vehicles themselves deserve.

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We at Ford Truck Enthusiasts want to change that. When we initially read that the 2018 F-150’s engine lineup boasted best-in-class payload, towing capacity, and gas mileage we couldn’t help but say: “Oh cool.” In reality, we should’ve said: “HECK YES!” Trust us, eventually,  we did.

Despite it looking like just another automaker claim, achieving an EPA estimated rating of 20 mpg city, 26 mpg highway and 22 mpg combined is an incredible feat. Yes, the 2.7-liter EcoBoost engine will (according to the EPA) deliver a whopping 26 mph on the highway. Now, allow us to remind you that we’re talking about a half-ton pickup truck which in 2005 delivered  14 mpg city, 18 mpg highway, and 15 mpg combined from a 4.2-liter V6.

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What’s even more impressive is that Ford has managed to deliver substantial fuel efficiency improvements, while increasing power from a paltry 202 hp in the aforementioned 2005 V6, to 325 hp in the second-generation 2.7-liter EcoBoost motor. While we’re big fans of the lovely Coyote V8 motor, we’re not quite sure why some folks still dislike the more powerful and considerably more efficient turbocharged engine.

When it comes to the 5.0-liter V8, we’re big fans of the Coyote motor, really. The fact is, it’s simply not the best engine for most pickup applications — except towing. In the end, we’re not quite sure why some folks still dislike the more powerful and considerably more efficient turbocharged engine.

Chime in with your thoughts on the forum. >>

Jerry Perez is a regular contributor to Ford Truck Enthusiasts, Corvette Forum, and 6SpeedOnline, among other auto sites.

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