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Old 07-05-2014, 08:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonanza35 View Post
I would think the V10 in a F550 would get maybe 6mpg. I think at that rate I would try the 6.7L. But if the 7.3L was available I would go that route.
MPG is not a factor when purchasing our trucks for fleet use. We average about 6 mpg across the board for any truck that has an aerial device which the majority of our fleet. In our branch, we have 12 little bucket trucks (29' to bottom of bucket) and they all are on F-450 chassis. I think 7 or 8 have the 7.3 and the rest are V10. Fuel cost per week is about the same for either type. Our F-550 trucks have the 6.0 liter diesel and a 42' articulating insulated bucket.....they use the same amount of fuel as the other two. The majority of the time those trucks are parked with a man working in the air. The engine has to be running for the bucket to operate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KJNDIVER View Post
shakenbake, if the 7.3 was that much more reliable, why not drop some crate motors in w/ new trans, maybe change some suspension parts, brakes, seats, interior, etc, and get back going? One would think that could done cheaper than what a new truck would be. But im just guessing...... and i guess the TIME needed to do all of that is money lost if its your business, when you can go down to lot, pick it up and drive and start making money again......
A crate motor does us no good....none of our 7.3 liter trucks need replacement engines except for Lindey (1998 International 4700 26,000 lbs GVW). That engine actually runs fine but leaks so much it doesn't pass DOT inspection. The shop pulled the engine and found the block cracked at the oil pan mounting holes. Apparently someone removed the pan sometime in the past and they used an impact gun to re-install the bolts. IH says the sealant got in the threaded bolt holes and hydraulic pressure busted out the bosses. So, we have a new engine on it's way for that truck.

We purchased 18 Power Stroke Fords with the 7.3 liter engine. All 18 are still running. Those trucks go out every day. It's pretty rare to see those trucks having problems. They aren't perfect, but compared to our other vehicles, the 7.3 Power Strokes are very solid

If you are suggesting that we replace the 6.0 liter engines with a 7.3 then that is not possible. The truck would never pass emissions or DOT inspection and we would have to place it out of service. The emissions testing regulations in our area require that all original systems remain on the truck as it left the factory. So, if it left the factory with a 6.0 liter engine, then it must always have a 6.0 liter engine complete with the EGR, Cat etc. It has a 6.4 liter....then it must always have a 6.4 liter along with the DPF etc.

From a strictly financial perspective....if the 7.3 was available today, then almost every fleet manager in the country would purchase them for their fleet because the cost to operate is much lower than anything else out there. Some of our 7.3 Power Stroke trucks are 15 years old now and we aren't even considering replacing those trucks. Rule of thumb for our fleet is that we replace the chassis after 10 years and the body after 20 years. We are making plans to purchase some more F-450s with the V10 engine and move the bucket bodies over but we have decided to hang on to the 7.3 liter trucks until the bucket is 20 years old and then we'll sell them as a complete unit. It looks like the 7.3 liter Power Strokes are going to last the full 20 years which is twice as long as we planned for when they were first purchased. No other truck/engine combo in our fleet has accomplished that feat. We first started purchasing a fleet in 1963.
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