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-   -   2006 5.4 Spark Plug Change- 100% success & procedure I used (http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/1063803-2006-5-4-spark-plug-change-100-success-and-procedure-i-used.html)

Beechkid 05-02-2011 04:05 PM

2006 5.4 Spark Plug Change- 100% success & procedure I used
 
Over the weekend I decided it was time to change the plugs (2006 Mark LT 4x2, 5.4, 35,000 miles) with the Motorcraft SP 515’s. Although I knew about the carbon build-up/plug removal issue, I decided not to change the plugs until there was a replacement plug that I was comfortable with…meaning I knew it was a good quality plug in terms of component design and construction. Although I did following the most recent TSB, I also relied on my experience back in the 1970’s when aluminum heads & intake manifolds were just entering the street scene and never-seize did not exist. Here are the exceptions to the TSB that I did…
1. I ran Lucas fuel injection cleaner, mixed at 3 times their recommendation in 1 full tank of gasoline. Purpose…if I was lucky, it would dissolve or loosen any carbon buildup (although many do a real fuel injection cleaning also)
2. Although I am a fan of PB Blaster, I used a product called ChemSearch “Yield”. The issue I have with using carb cleaner is the lack of lubrication…..in the old days of removing steel plugs from aluminum heads, we use to mix up acetone & ATF…or of we needed more lubrication, kerosene & ATF, “Yield” provides this lubrication- much better IMHO than even PB Blaster.
3. Yes, I put anti-seize on the plug threads (I know the TSB says not to)
4. Of course…a lot of patience, I really doubt if I ever put more than 20-25 lbs of force during removal (purposefully)
The end result, only one plug even “squeaked” coming out (but it basically unscrewed like a regular plug- literally). Plug #4 was initially a little stubborn, but after the second try, then waiting about 30 minutes, it came out with very little effort…just kept wiggling the plugs (tightening/loosening) by 1/8th or even less of a turn- and they all came out without a single one breaking or any issue really.
Actual working time: 2 hours…..including washing my hands, total time was 5 hours.
FYI- Why I choose Motorcraft.
In the 1970’s I ran (like many) Champion’s in just about everything (even had the gold palladiums), but stopped in the early 1980’s when they changed their copper-core design and the resulting quality problems that IMHO still exist today. Since then I have run Splitfire (non-platinum) in my old world (1960’s) cars, Bosch in my late 1990’s vehicles (both because the cylinder head design really prefers these types of plugs), but I really had hesitation because of the construction/component quality of the non-Motorcraft plugs and really questioned the durability in this application about the Motorcraft SP508 or SP 509’s which are single platinum. Given the types of loads and burn/flame promulgation rates in the chambers, I really had doubts about the style of the plug with single platinum having the ability to “survive” as long as they engineers said. What do ya know…the SP 515’s are double platinum.

Oldguy4 05-02-2011 06:37 PM

Great post, thanks for the tip on the ChemSearch "yield". I'll have to look for it and get some. This is off subject, but I just used PB Blaster today. The Bendix starter drive on my old '54 Ford Tractor was all rusted up and wouldn't engage. Pulled the starter, removed the little pin that holds the drive on the shaft. The drive wouldn't budge, so I hit it with some 'blaster', waited a few minutes and gently tapped it with a hammer and off it came.

tooldad 05-03-2011 11:33 AM

Congratulations, and thanks for the post. Really pisses me off though since I broke 7 of 8 following the TSB except using PB Blaster and "extra" precautions. Total time about 12 hours. Got the first one out clean (#1 cyl), but the rest broke. Not so hard but aggravating and time consuming. I will have to look up that "Yield". Others swear by Kroil too.

Joe04F150 05-03-2011 12:58 PM

You only have 35k miles correct? Probably why they came out easier. I have 80k and tackling this over the summer sometime. I'll give that lubricant a shot. Thanks for sharing :-X22

Mustangtoby2001 05-03-2011 09:50 PM

My company has had good luck running a can of Seafoam through a couple of tanks of fuel prior to changing plugs in the company trucks. Our shop forman says no carbon on any of them with 3 tanks Seafoam ran through them. Take it for what it's worth, I'm at 70k on my personal F150 and thinking this summer would be a good time to change plugs. Seafoam can't hurt to try.

03r1 05-04-2011 05:45 PM

I changed all of mine and had no problems. you just have to take your time and not be a muscle head. I had one that would not move at all wheni started. but i just kept working it back and forth til it came out.

Shawns Fords 05-04-2011 06:01 PM

we use B&G En-force which is similar to PB blaster but seems to work a bit faster. along with a fuel induction/injection flush works great to help you get them plugs out. the last one I had was @ 120k and all 8 still broke off with less than half of a turn of the plug with literally the force of a baby turning them. Engine was completely sludged up along with carbon buildup on not only the heads and plugs but the runners were froze. I thought the customer would need a new intake but that En-force cleaned it up really well. The best tool for one of these broken plugs is from Cornwell. It takes about 1/2 hour per plug if you do need to remove one.

lunatech 05-14-2011 09:44 AM

@Shawns Fords: Which extractor tool from Cornwell are you referring to? I looked on their site and they have quite a few. I would love to know which one you use (anything to make a potential bad job easier).

Regarding SeaFoam, I love that stuff. I've used it for years and it works wonders. I've used it in oil to clean the system, ran it through gummed up carbs to clean them, and put in my bike every winter as fuel stabilizer. That stuff is awesome. Reminds me, I need to get some more, used the last bit in a push mower that hasn't been started in 8 years (worked great).

magnet1 05-14-2011 03:37 PM

There is also another product that we use at work called KROIL "The oil that kreeps"; That is there motto. So far we have had better results with it over anything else.

lunatech 05-14-2011 11:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by magnet1 (Post 10340681)
There is also another product that we use at work called KROIL "The oil that kreeps"; That is there motto. So far we have had better results with it over anything else.

I've been and industrial technician for over 20 years and have used KROIL for as long. That stuff is great, works every time.

mik369 05-15-2011 08:54 AM

Changed mine yesterday 100,000 miles. Had everything ready including lisle tool. Cracked 1/8 turn sprayed seafaom deep creep.2 hour soak used heat with special nozzle to direct heat in plug well for 40 seconds. Wrenched right out. No breakage. very happy. Was on a 2005 F-150.:-jammin

Shawns Fords 05-15-2011 12:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lunatech (Post 10339805)
@Shawns Fords: Which extractor tool from Cornwell are you referring to? I looked on their site and they have quite a few. I would love to know which one you use (anything to make a potential bad job easier).

Regarding SeaFoam, I love that stuff. I've used it for years and it works wonders. I've used it in oil to clean the system, ran it through gummed up carbs to clean them, and put in my bike every winter as fuel stabilizer. That stuff is awesome. Reminds me, I need to get some more, used the last bit in a push mower that hasn't been started in 8 years (worked great).

The one for Ford Triton

http://www.cornwelltools.com/webcat/...100__42004.png
HR39100 - Ford Triton Spark Spark Plug Extension Kt - Cornwell Webcat
tool kit HR39100

lunatech 05-17-2011 05:57 PM

Thanks for the link, guess I didn't search well enough or I looked over it.:-X22

floattrip 05-25-2011 03:01 AM

Plugs
 
I have always changed my own plugs in every car/truck I have owned. I am very nervous about doing so since my truck has 145K on it and the plugs need to be replaced. I have put it off for some time now but I need to do it before summer is here. What should I do if the plugs break? What advice do you have for me? Shop?? Thanks for your help!!

Shawns Fords 05-25-2011 11:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by floattrip (Post 10383143)
I have always changed my own plugs in every car/truck I have owned. I am very nervous about doing so since my truck has 145K on it and the plugs need to be replaced. I have put it off for some time now but I need to do it before summer is here. What should I do if the plugs break? What advice do you have for me? Shop?? Thanks for your help!!

buy that tool kit from cornwell I posted in the link above, I would suggest having an intake plenum/induction service done before to remove as much build up on these plugs before you change them. It is quite a job, I am a Ford tech and have done a few so far and that tool is your best friend when doing this change. The last set I did broke every plug within less than 1/4 turn. it was an 05 with 120k. It is hit and miss on when they break or do not break. So it is best to have the tool just in case.


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