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  #1  
Old 04-17-2010, 10:01 AM
gsthompson gsthompson is offline
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95 Ranger clutch removal question

Hi Guys,

95 Ranger, 2wd, 2.3L, 5 speed manual...clutch replacement.

Thanks to all the help from this forum I was able to finally get the transmission out. Now I'm working on the clutch. The clutch assembly is fairly rusty (mostly surface rust). and the truck has been sitting in the garage since December as I continue to fix all the major problems.

Like an idiot I didn't read the manual first and simply removed all of the pressure plate bolts - instead of releasing pressure slowly and in a crisscross pattern. When I got to the last 2 bolts I started to get some release tension but continued to remove all of the bolts. I've put in the clutch alignment tool to hold the assemble in place but now I'm having difficultly removing the pressure plate.

I don't want to mess up the flywheel. Can I hammer on the pressure plate to free it up for removal? Or will this mess up the flywheel.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks everyone, I couldn't do this without all the help (I'm a pretty needy guy ;o)

George
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Old 04-19-2010, 08:06 AM
tomw tomw is offline
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Put the bolts back in. Get the pressure plate parallel to the flywheel surface, and release the spring tension a little at a time, loosening the bolts 1 or 1/2 turn each. I make the assumption that it is hanging up on the alignment pin or dowel...no?
tom
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Old 04-19-2010, 10:57 AM
gsthompson gsthompson is offline
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Thanks Tom, I think you are correct about the dowel pins. I put the bolts back in last night and sprayed PB on the pins. I'll try again tonight. Wasn't sure if I could be using a flat blade screw driver to leverage this off. I'll let you know. Thanks again. George
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Old 04-19-2010, 08:03 PM
gsthompson gsthompson is offline
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Hey Tom,

That worked great. I now have the pressure plate and clutch disk off. They actually look pretty clean after about 150,000 miles. Flywheel looks fairly clean also with only some surface checking. I'm still going to remove the flywheel and have it resurfaced and put in a new clutch set. Also want to replace the rear main seal.

Question that I have is that 2 of the flywheel dowel pins came off with the pressure plate. Do they just slide into the flywheel? The one that is still in the flywheel looks slightly longer then the others.
Last question... once I get the flywheel bolts off is it going to be a PITA removing the flywheel? Any tricks to this?

Thanks again for your help.
George
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Old 04-20-2010, 08:07 AM
tomw tomw is offline
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I don't think the guide pins were supposed to come off with the pressure plate. When the surface is re-ground, the machinist would have to remove them anyway, so take the pressure plate with you so s/he can re-install them after resurfacing.
Problems you face are breaking loose the large funny-headed bolts that screw into the end of the crankshaft. The crankshaft will want to turn while you want it to stay still. The only blocking mechanism I can think of are 1)strap wrench around the front pulley or 2) using a breaker bar on the bolt in the nose of the crankshaft braced against the frame to hold it still. The flywheel is also heavy, so don't put fingers or toes in its way if you happen to lose control. It will sit on the end of the crankshaft, but don't rely on its staying there without a 'helping hand' to steady it.
When you go to put it back, be sure that you don't get grease or oil on the machined surface or you'll be back doing it again soon as a contaminated clutch will grab erratically and you won't be happy.
Some flywheels are supposed to be installed in one way only. Check to see if there are marks or different bolt alignments that indicate the flywheel should go on only one way. I think the bolt pattern may be slightly eccentric, forcing you to put it on only one way. I haven't done a clutch in years.
tom
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Last edited by tomw; 04-20-2010 at 08:12 AM. Reason: more
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Old 04-20-2010, 09:27 AM
gsthompson gsthompson is offline
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Thanks. These are all great tips. How does the weight of the flywheel compare to the pressure plate? I'm thinking the pressure plate was about 30 to 35 lbs. Is the flywheel around 50 lbs? I'm getting weaker as I get older ;o|
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Old 04-21-2010, 07:31 AM
gsthompson gsthompson is offline
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Hey Tom, Got the flywheel removed - this was probably the easiest part of the project. I used your suggestion about putting a breaker bar on the front crankshaft bolt to keep the flywheel secured. This worked great. And yes, the flywheel is somewhat heavy but was still manageable for me (I'm guessing 30 to 35 lbs). Now I'm moving on to the pilot bearing and the rear seal. Wish me luck. Thanks again, George
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Old 09-17-2010, 06:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsthompson View Post
Hey Tom, Got the flywheel removed - this was probably the easiest part of the project. I used your suggestion about putting a breaker bar on the front crankshaft bolt to keep the flywheel secured. This worked great. And yes, the flywheel is somewhat heavy but was still manageable for me (I'm guessing 30 to 35 lbs). Now I'm moving on to the pilot bearing and the rear seal. Wish me luck. Thanks again, George
I am going to be doing the same thing. I have heard that removing the top 2 bolts on the tranny are a pita. how do you access them? did i read somewhere that you get to them through the shifter opening in the cab? did you rear main seal come right out? how did you repalce the seal, use a special tool or just a pipe?
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Old 09-17-2010, 08:36 AM
tomw tomw is offline
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Just to add, you can also put some rope into one of the cylinders and bring that piston to TDC. It will jam solid to prevent the crank from turning.
Power: I would suggest getting a long 3/8" drive extension and, after removing the rear transmission support & driveshaft, reach up over the top or upper sides of the transmission to the top two bolts. Harbor Freight makes a set of 'wobbly' extensions. They are machined or stamped such that the square drive allows the socket to shift up to XX degrees from straight on. They are WONDERFUL for doing clutch jobs. You can snake the long extension up with a wobbly extension added, and the socket will most times just push right in place without any trouble at all. They also are a lot more usable than the 'universal joint' sockets because they won't break as easily.
FWIW, you can buy 'blind internal pullers' from HF, or you can pack the pilot bearing full of grease or similar, and then use a tool of appropriate diameter to 'hydraulically' push the pilot bearing out. A hammer comes in handy to operate the 'plunger'. Replace grease or oiled 'fluid' as needed. I read the other day that someone used oiled paper towels or something in lieu of grease. Brain cell must've died... can't remember what it was, but it made sense turning a dry substance that would fall out into one that would stay there, and wouldn't hurt anything. Just can't remember.
tom
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Old 09-17-2010, 09:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomw View Post
Just to add, you can also put some rope into one of the cylinders and bring that piston to TDC. It will jam solid to prevent the crank from turning.
Power: I would suggest getting a long 3/8" drive extension and, after removing the rear transmission support & driveshaft, reach up over the top or upper sides of the transmission to the top two bolts. Harbor Freight makes a set of 'wobbly' extensions. They are machined or stamped such that the square drive allows the socket to shift up to XX degrees from straight on. They are WONDERFUL for doing clutch jobs. You can snake the long extension up with a wobbly extension added, and the socket will most times just push right in place without any trouble at all. They also are a lot more usable than the 'universal joint' sockets because they won't break as easily.
FWIW, you can buy 'blind internal pullers' from HF, or you can pack the pilot bearing full of grease or similar, and then use a tool of appropriate diameter to 'hydraulically' push the pilot bearing out. A hammer comes in handy to operate the 'plunger'. Replace grease or oiled 'fluid' as needed. I read the other day that someone used oiled paper towels or something in lieu of grease. Brain cell must've died... can't remember what it was, but it made sense turning a dry substance that would fall out into one that would stay there, and wouldn't hurt anything. Just can't remember.
tom
tom
thanks i will check out HF. I need a 1' extension anyways!!!
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Old 09-17-2010, 09:57 AM
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