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6.4L Power Stroke Diesel Engine fitted to 2008 - 2010 F250, F350 and F450 pickup trucks and F350 + Cab Chassis SPONSORED BY:

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Old 11-06-2008, 06:03 PM
07350PSD 07350PSD is offline
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What is Regen?

What is Regen i plan on buying another truck soon?
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Old 11-06-2008, 06:23 PM
deadbug deadbug is offline
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Look down the page at the current topic How often does "cleaning exhaust
come on. That should help, also you do a search on regen
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Old 11-06-2008, 06:47 PM
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regen is short in this forum for regeneration of the DPF (dust Particate Filter)
You asked for it so here it is:
Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF)
Overview

Diesel particulate filters applicable to the equipment used in your Metal or Nonmetal mine are designed to filter diesel soot from the hot exhaust. They also replace the muffler. The filter media used in the majority of the commercially available DPFs is made from a porous ceramic material made from either Cordierite or Silicon Carbide. The Silicon Carbide material is more robust, filters slightly more efficiently, but is more expensive.
The filters work by blocking passage of the diesel soot so that much less than 10% of the soot in the engine’s exhaust is released into the mine air. Obviously, soot builds up in the filter and something has to be done to remove it. The process of removing the combustible portion of the collected soot is called "regeneration" which is the burning off of the soot by raising the temperature of the filter element so that combustion of the soot occurs. When the soot combusts, the soot which is almost pure carbon is converted to gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon monoxide (CO), which pass through the filter. Diesel soot or DPM is not entirely comprised of combustible carbon but also contains noncombustible ash resulting primarily from the additives used in crankcase lubrication oils, fuel or intake air additives, and from the fuel itself. The removal of the ash from the DPF is called "cleaning" and, although necessary to do, is done much less frequently than regeneration. See the discussion of ash in this document.
DPF regeneration can occur "passively," or naturally when the engine exhaust is hot enough during equipment operation. Some DPFs use a washcoat of specially-formulated catalysts, fuel-borne catalysts (a fuel additive), or both to reduce the exhaust temperature needed for regeneration.
When natural passive regeneration is not possible, the DPF stores the soot during machine operation, and a regeneration must be "actively" performed on a regular schedule, for example once every shift. Active regeneration uses electric heating elements and a controlled air flow to regenerate the filter when the equipment is not in use. The commercially available systems for active regeneration either incorporate the electric heating element into the DPF and regeneration takes place on-board the equipment while the equipment is off duty and parked at a designated location, or require the exchange of the loaded DPF for a regenerated DPF. In the exchange scheme, the loaded DPF is taken to a regeneration station located in a designated area (perhaps with other such regeneration stations) that is ventilated and free of combustibles either underground or on the surface. Another system uses compressed air, flowing in the reverse direction from the normal exhaust flow, to blow out the collected soot and ash into a collection bag.
The exhaust temperature dictates whether passive or active DPFs are applicable for a specific piece of equipment. Active systems are universally applicable because they only collect the soot and can be mounted where convenient, but passive systems impose strict requirements on exhaust temperatures and must be mounted as close to the engine exhaust manifold as possible.
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Old 11-06-2008, 06:49 PM
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ok, maybe a little over the top but is refers to the cleaning of the DPF to turn the trapped soot into ash and then blow it out the pipes. That is why on the newer trucks you don't see that black smoke anymore. Emissions.
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Scott-2013 F350 with a lot of tires.
2013 40' 4-slider stoneridge 5th wheel coming in at 15,400
http://www.ford-trucks.com/guidelines.html

Previous Truck 2008 F250 6.4 with lots of upgrades and a suspension upgrade from Torklift International StableLoads
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Old 11-06-2008, 07:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by senix View Post
regen is short in this forum for regeneration of the DPF (dust Particate Filter)
You asked for it so here it is:
Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF)
Overview

Diesel particulate filters applicable to the equipment used in your Metal or Nonmetal mine are designed to filter diesel soot from the hot exhaust. They also replace the muffler. The filter media used in the majority of the commercially available DPFs is made from a porous ceramic material made from either Cordierite or Silicon Carbide. The Silicon Carbide material is more robust, filters slightly more efficiently, but is more expensive.
The filters work by blocking passage of the diesel soot so that much less than 10% of the soot in the engine’s exhaust is released into the mine air. Obviously, soot builds up in the filter and something has to be done to remove it. The process of removing the combustible portion of the collected soot is called "regeneration" which is the burning off of the soot by raising the temperature of the filter element so that combustion of the soot occurs. When the soot combusts, the soot which is almost pure carbon is converted to gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon monoxide (CO), which pass through the filter. Diesel soot or DPM is not entirely comprised of combustible carbon but also contains noncombustible ash resulting primarily from the additives used in crankcase lubrication oils, fuel or intake air additives, and from the fuel itself. The removal of the ash from the DPF is called "cleaning" and, although necessary to do, is done much less frequently than regeneration. See the discussion of ash in this document.
DPF regeneration can occur "passively," or naturally when the engine exhaust is hot enough during equipment operation. Some DPFs use a washcoat of specially-formulated catalysts, fuel-borne catalysts (a fuel additive), or both to reduce the exhaust temperature needed for regeneration.
When natural passive regeneration is not possible, the DPF stores the soot during machine operation, and a regeneration must be "actively" performed on a regular schedule, for example once every shift. Active regeneration uses electric heating elements and a controlled air flow to regenerate the filter when the equipment is not in use. The commercially available systems for active regeneration either incorporate the electric heating element into the DPF and regeneration takes place on-board the equipment while the equipment is off duty and parked at a designated location, or require the exchange of the loaded DPF for a regenerated DPF. In the exchange scheme, the loaded DPF is taken to a regeneration station located in a designated area (perhaps with other such regeneration stations) that is ventilated and free of combustibles either underground or on the surface. Another system uses compressed air, flowing in the reverse direction from the normal exhaust flow, to blow out the collected soot and ash into a collection bag.
The exhaust temperature dictates whether passive or active DPFs are applicable for a specific piece of equipment. Active systems are universally applicable because they only collect the soot and can be mounted where convenient, but passive systems impose strict requirements on exhaust temperatures and must be mounted as close to the engine exhaust manifold as possible.
Senix,
Was that a copy and paste, or do we need to worry about you ???
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Old 11-06-2008, 07:04 PM
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copied..there is no way I would even dream that one up
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Old 11-06-2008, 07:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by senix View Post
ok, maybe a little over the top but is refers to the cleaning of the DPF to turn the trapped soot into ash and then blow it out the pipes. That is why on the newer trucks you don't see that black smoke anymore. Emissions.

Your statement is partially correct. The combustible soot trapped in the filter is turned into CO and CO2 gas which passes thru the filter. The remaining uncombustible soot is trapped in the filter as ash and must be cleaned from the filter by a special machine aka large vacuum cleaner.

Also, your original article described the regeneration of an off-highway machine's dpf by utlilizing electric heating elements OR an exchange program. On-highway vehicles increase the DOC temp by injecting hydrocarbons into the dpf thus causing an exothermic reaction. Soot oxidizes at a nearly 3 times the temperature during active regeneration as opposed to passive regeneration.
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Old 11-08-2008, 07:58 PM
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I thought that some raw fuel was put into the PDF during regen mode in order to burn off the trapped particles. Is this incorrect?
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Old 11-09-2008, 09:06 AM
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I thought that some raw fuel was put into the PDF during regen mode in order to burn off the trapped particles. Is this incorrect?
Yes, hydrocarbons = raw diesel fuel.
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Old 11-09-2008, 05:52 PM
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Now I know why I was not a science major in college. Thanks rob_nc for the confirmation.
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Old 11-23-2008, 07:53 PM
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It is the most embarrassing thing that can happen to your new truck. For a short time (approx 1 mile) it billows out blue smoke like a 1959 Plymouth in need of a valve job. Man does iot look ugly. You want to hide if your in traffic on small town USA. Luckily it doesn't do it that often and it dosen't last that long. The first time you sit back thinking a rod is about to come out the block.
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Old 11-23-2008, 08:48 PM
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harddock, somthing is wrong with your truck.. u should have no smoke during a regen. other than a high idle, u shouldnt even notice it.. have your truck checked out buddy
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Old 11-24-2008, 06:37 AM
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I was less than a mile away from the dealer the first time it did it. I immediately drove into the dealer, explained what was happening and they said that was normal. Others I have talked to say theirs did the exact same thing. Maybe you just haven't expierienced it yet.
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Old 11-24-2008, 12:44 PM
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Yes, it is normal to have the smoke under certain conditions but I haven't seen it yet after getting the TCM killing flash.
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Old 11-25-2008, 01:37 AM
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stalwart, not to sound like a jerk.. but your wrong.. and harddock, your dealer is wrong.. most of the ford techs are clueless.. the one by my house didnt even know what a dpf was! lol. anyway, with the new smog system (egr, cat, and dpf) when the system is functioning properly there can be no smoke. if any smoke gets by then u have a bad dpf. that filter was designed so that not one single particulate gets by. once again.. if u have any smoke, take your truck in, demand a new dpf and the most current reflash. yul thank me later.. all that smoke is unburned fuel!
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Old 11-25-2008, 01:37 AM
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