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1948 - 1956 F1, F100 & Larger F-Series Trucks Discuss the Fat Fendered and Classic Ford Trucks

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  #196  
Old 09-26-2010, 08:37 AM
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Heres a useful tip if your glovebox door doesn't quite stay fully in the up position. Mine would constantly be slightly open even with a new spring behind (about an inch) so I started looking for a simple way to keep it shut.

I lucked out with one of those little extending magnetic pickup tools - they often use a little round magnet on the end (but its more powerful than most). I cut the magnet off and it fit right in place of one of the glovebox door bumbers. A dab of glue on the back and now its perfect - plus you'd never notice its there.

I got the pick up tool from one of those super cheapo stores.
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  #197  
Old 10-18-2010, 10:49 AM
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I didn't read all the pages, just a few, so not sure if this has been covered.

I used to rebuild turbochargers. Taking them apart was always a chore due to the rusty bolts on the exhaust housing from the heat expansion.

So for any bolt that is hard to remove, feels like it might break, or you're just unsure of how tough it will be to get out, try this.

Place a center punch directly on the head of the bolt and give it a few good solid hits with a heavy hammer or small sledge hammer straight down. Then put your wrench or socket on it and give it a tug, usually it will come loose much easier than using penetrating oil/heating it with a torch, or beating the hell out of it with a breaker bar, vise grips, etc. It's the same shocking effect as an impact but you're not turning the bolt during the shocks.
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  #198  
Old 11-19-2010, 01:45 PM
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I love this thread. Lots of good stuff. This is common sense and nothing. But, for whatever reason, I despise crawling back under my vehicles to gather up my tools when I realize the job is done. And I hate having to grab my jack stands and depend on that jack alone for the few seconds at the end of a job. I stumbled across one of these magnets at Big Lots (I think). They're very lightweight but yet strong enough to grab all of your stuff and can pull even the biggest jack stands out of the way without you having to risk getting your skull smashed. Great for picking up all kinds of things and they fall right off when you pull the handle. They're cheap. Grab one next time you see them.

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  #199  
Old 11-23-2010, 10:29 PM
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I don't know if this has been mentioned before. This is a trick I learned from my dad about 50 years ago on the farm for making gaskets from scratch. Back then he would have gasket material that came in sheets.

Lay the gasket material over the part that you need a gasket for and tap litely all around and over the sharp corners with a small ball peen hammer (bolt holes too). This is the method I use if it's Sunday and I'm desperate. Surprisingly this makes an accurate fit. I imagine that the material is still available in that form, and, it is really handy to have around. I have a small roll in my tool box that I picked up many years ago.
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Old 11-23-2010, 10:41 PM
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I use dry erase markers, the type you use on white message boards, for marking on painted surfaces for holes or if I want to paint an image I make an outline and fill in between the lines, kind like a paint by numbers painting. After you're done you just wipe off with a dry cloth. The lines will smudge a little if you rub against the them, you just have to be little careful when using them but that's what's nice about using them. You don't have to use any chemicals to remove and they don't scratch the paint.
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  #201  
Old 11-24-2010, 02:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Mervy49 View Post
I don't know if this has been mentioned before. This is a trick I learned from my dad about 50 years ago on the farm for making gaskets from scratch. Back then he would have gasket material that came in sheets.

Lay the gasket material over the part that you need a gasket for and tap litely all around and over the sharp corners with a small ball peen hammer (bolt holes too). This is the method I use if it's Sunday and I'm desperate. Surprisingly this makes an accurate fit. I imagine that the material is still available in that form, and, it is really handy to have around. I have a small roll in my tool box that I picked up many years ago.
I've made a lot of gaskets that way for carbs, thermostat housings, water pumps, fuel pumps, etc. Use the ball end of the hammer to tap over the holes. Sheet gasket material is available in a couple different thicknesses at NAPA and Motor Bearing and Parts stores.
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  #202  
Old 11-24-2010, 03:29 PM
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I've made a lot of gaskets that way for carbs, thermostat housings, water pumps, fuel pumps, etc. Use the ball end of the hammer to tap over the holes. Sheet gasket material is available in a couple different thicknesses at NAPA and Motor Bearing and Parts stores.
Another thing about it is you get the right gasket for the application every time.
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  #203  
Old 12-02-2010, 08:17 PM
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I have a drawer full of different types of gasket material from paper thin to cardboard thick even heat resistant. I have had it for about 40 years and it has saved me many times in that time. I bought it every thickness and type the supplier had at the time in the smallest rolls they would sell. Way back then it didn't cost much.

I used the small ball peen aproach and one day someone pointed out the even smaller ball peen hammer I had picked up in a garage sale for my young son was in fact a gasket hammer. I traded him for a bigger hammer and now I use a vintage gasket hammer. Young son is now 35.
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  #204  
Old 12-23-2010, 11:13 AM
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To add to the gasket making tips...

Using bullet shell casings is another way to punch clean holes in gasket material if you don't have a set of hole punches.

Also, making a gasket template out of paper is easy if you lay it on the surface and rub your dirty hands on the outside. You'll be able to see your shape, cut it out with scissors or a blade, and then test fit & transfer to your gasket material.

Great tips guys, keep them coming.
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  #205  
Old 12-23-2010, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by AstroFab View Post
To add to the gasket making tips...

Using bullet shell casings is another way to punch clean holes in gasket material if you don't have a set of hole punches.

Also, making a gasket template out of paper is easy if you lay it on the surface and rub your dirty hands on the outside. You'll be able to see your shape, cut it out with scissors or a blade, and then test fit & transfer to your gasket material.

Great tips guys, keep them coming.
Great idea!...I used a similar method to get the number off my engine block when I couldn't get under to see with my eyes...I used my dirty fingers and masking tape.
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  #206  
Old 01-05-2011, 10:50 PM
52 M1 Kootenay Kid 52 M1 Kootenay Kid is offline
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Door Removal

I chose to seperate the door hinge from the door jam.
I used a Greenlee 3/4 UniBit.
I had excellent results.The Phillips screw hole worked as a center for starting.The flare on the way up the unibit matched the countersink taper fairly well.
Greenlee has fairly good steel and did all the screws like butter.A gentle screwdriver pry was all that was needed to pop the last thin thread of screw steel free.
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  #207  
Old 01-11-2011, 12:33 AM
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One time I was working with coil springs on my other hot rod and desperately needed a spring compressor so I fabricated this devise with some parts and scraps I had laying around. It works great for independent front end front suspensions.

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my truck is a 1949 Ford F47,
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  #208  
Old 01-11-2011, 10:04 AM
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One time I was working with coil springs on my other hot rod and desperately needed a spring compressor so I fabricated this devise with some parts and scraps I had laying around. It works great for independent front end front suspensions.

good work! for those considering making something similar: Be sure to use hardened bolts at least grade 5, not common soft bolts or all-thread from the DIY store. You would not want the threads to strip under load. Most coil springs are at least 400-500# of force per inch of compression. Some of the chain auto parts stores have free loaner tools you can borrow with a deposit refunded when you return them, even if you don't buy anything.
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  #209  
Old 01-12-2011, 09:25 AM
52 M1 Kootenay Kid 52 M1 Kootenay Kid is offline
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6 VOLT ELECTRICAL TIPS and TRICKS

6 VOLT ELECTRICAL TIPS and TRICKS by "rumbleseat"

Iíll use the term ďVOMĒ to denote volt/ohm/amp/meter.

STARTERS:
The starter current draw on a Ford V-8 through 1948 is 550 amps (does not include V-8 60ís) . The starter cranks a stock flathead engine at 100 rpms. The 1949 - 1951 engines crank 130 rpm (without an automatic transmission)

GENERATOR DOES NOT CHARGE:
Two brush Ford generators use the shunt type generator design. The field circuit has an internally grounded field. ... unlike MoPar and GM which ground through the regulator. To test a Ford generator and/or regulator on the car, simply ground the field terminal at either the generator or regulator with the engine turning about 1000 rpm and watch the amp gauge (do not disconnect any wires) . Grounding the field removes all external regulation on the generator and it will go immediately to full charge mode. If the ammeter shows charge when you ground the field, the regulator is at fault. If the ammeter does not show charge, the generator is defective. Note the generator may have shorted out the regulator when it went bad.
Since the 6 volt regulators are still mechanical and can be set, it may be beneficial to know what is where inside them.


the cutout relay is directly behind the BAT terminal
the current relay is directly behind the ARM terminal
the voltage relay is directly behind the FIELD terminal
When an emergency occurs on the road, the regulator can be adjusted in an attempt to coax a defective regulator into working. To increase any of these settings, remove the cover and bend the rest that the flat spring rests upon upward. Bending should be minor in nature.... donít exceed 0.020Ē.
If the generator charges when you ground the field itís possible to rig up a ground on the field terminal to charge the battery in an emergency. Remembering that this will cause the generator to go to full charge, it is only logical that such action will cause the generator to overheat. Which will eventually melt the solder in the armature and ruin it. To prevent this excessive overheating, only ground the field for 10 minutes maximum at a time.
If you want to keep driving and not have to keep stopping, connect an insulated wire to the field terminal of the regulator or generator and route it to the inside of the car. Bare the end of this an inch or so and wrap it around something grounded (like an ashtray) when you want to charge the battery.

POLARIZING A 2 BRUSH FORD GENERATOR:
Disconnect the FIELD terminal wire at the regulator and momentarily touch this wire to the BAT terminal of the regulator. NEVER use a jumper wire to keep from disconnecting the fieldwire at the regulator itíll ruin the regulator in a hurry.
The field wire MUST be disconnected from the regulator. MoPar and GM generators are not polarized in this manner due to their different design.

DIM LIGHTS:
Dim lights are usually caused by low voltage to the lightor by a weak ground. Naturally the battery has to be charged with good clean posts. The wires in a 6 volt system are considerably larger than in a 12 volt system. Be certain that any wiring youíve done is at LEAST as big as what your Ford came with to keep from choking the system.Usually the culprit is in the ground.... or rather the lack of.
The 6 volt battery should have the positive battery cable connected directly to the frame. Naturally the frame under the cable needs to be scraped bare and bright to function as a good ground. Make certain the frame and body are grounded by bolting a ground strap between them. Next thing is to make sure the bulb socket has a good ground between it and the frame. Clean the inside of thesocket with some steel wool or sand paper until itís shiny and bright. Many of these sockets are pressed into the reflector and this electrical union begins to fail electrically over the years. When in doubt, solder a length of wire to the brass socket itself and temporarily ground it directly to the frame. If this cures the dim light, youíll know exactly where the problem lies and whatísneeded to correct it.
If youíre running the stock 6 volt head light bulbs and theyíre something in the neighborhood of 25 watts, replace them with some 50/32 bulbs. It does wonders for them. Bertís Model A Center has these in stock.
Sometimes you have a bulb that is not burned out, but refuses to work in the socket. Could be the contacts are worn down too much. Just drop a little solder on these and theyí 11 work like new.

ELECTRICAL TERMINATIONS:
Iím always amazed at the number of these I find that are bad. We go to great lengths to cut the wire exactly the right length and to trim back the insulation just the right amount and crimp the new terminals neatly. These terminations usually function perfectly for sometime and then the electrics start giving troubles. After much frustration and messing around, we may finally get them to start working again. More often than not, they soon start acting up again.Many times I finally track the problem down to the crimped termination itself. At first the newly crimp works and current flows. Eventuallyoxidation starts and the resultant insulating occurs. The result is the crimped terminal becomes partially insulated between the wire and the terminal. Sometimes the crimp itself relaxes its hold due to heat and compression and the conductor becomes loose in the termination. To keep this from happening, I trim back about 1/16Ē more insulation than is needed. I push the bare wire clear through insulated part of the termination so that it extends 1/16Ē beyond it. Then, after I have crimped the insulated part of the terminal, I solder the 1/16Ē bare conductor solidly to the electrical terminal. Now it canít getloose or become insulated by oxidation. Iíve never had one fail when doing it this way. I solder all electrical connections.
As far as using the insulated crimp type splice connectors to splice two wires, I will not use them under any circumstance.... I just donít trust them since Iíve seen some burned up wiring caused by the wires pulling free of the splicing connector. I bare the two wires and do not twist them separately or together. Instead I push them straight into each other so the wires are intermixed with each other. After smoothing them out and squeezing them with pliers, I flow solder into this mix to make the splice permanent. I finish by using heat shrink tubing to cover the newly soldered splice. A trick I use here is to squeeze the soldered connection with pliers while itís still warm to reduce any blobs or peaks of solder so the heat shrink tubing will slide over the splice easily.As far as male ďbulletĒ connectors used in most early cars, Iíve always had trouble crimping them enough to hold them and still have them fit into the round female connector. I remove the insulated material from the bullet connector (grind a slot along one edge of the insulating area with the edge of the bench grinder and the insulation will pull right off). Then I bare the conductor just enough so the wire will just barely go all the way into the bullet. I flow solder into the bare bullet connector without ever crimping it After itís cooled, I slide some heat shrink tubing onto the bottom of the bullet and shrink it with a match.
Another thing I do is make all my battery cables. Seems the ones I purchase are always the wrong length, usually the wrong color, and Iím unsure as to how good they crimped the connectors onto the cables. I watch for long cables at the flea market and at swap meets. I use battery/starter terminations from my local parts store. I cut the cable to the exact length I want. Then I strip back the insulation, install and solder the new terminations to the cables. I finish them by using heat shrink tubing (sometimes two layers)

DISTRIBUTOR VACUUM ADVANCE: The 1948 and earlier Ford engines have a
different type of vacuum advance than we normally encounter. Intake manifold vacuum is routed to an internal brake inside the distributor. The amount of brake thatís applied to the centrifugal weight advance mechanism controls the degrees of advance. When vacuum drops, the brake spring overcomes the vacuum that is holding the brake away from rubbing against the centrifugal advance mechanism. The more spring tension there is being exerted against this brake,the sooner the brake is activated and the sooner the centrifugal advance mechanism is stopped thereby controlling the amount of advance.

To increase the spring tension and decrease the amount of centrifugal advance,turn the advance screw inwards. To decrease the spring tension and increase the amount of centrifugal advance, turn the advance screw outwards.
The vacuum advance screw is used to eliminate detonation.
To adjust initial (static) advance, loosen the lock screw on the side of the distributor and move the advance screw/plate up or down. As viewed from the front of the engine, moving the advance screw & plate clockwise advances the timing.

SETTING STATIC TIMING ON Ď42-í48 V-8 DISTRIBUTORS:
Stock Ford specifications call for the initial (or static) timing to be set at 4 degrees BTDC (Before Top Dead Center) . This is best set on a distributor machine. In the absence of one, it can be set using common tools. The following is from a Ford service bulletin for Ď42-í48 distributors.
[1] Remove the distributor and adjust both sets of points to 0.014Ē. Loosen the vacuum brake screw lock nut and back the screw out several turns. Loosen the advance screw/plate screw on the side of the distributor and verify it moves up and down fairly easily. We have to move this advance screw/plate to set the timing, so we need it to move easily.
[2] Connect up a continuity test light. Connect one lead of the test light to the screw stud the wire from the coil is connected to. The other test lead isgrounded to the distributor housing.
[3] Now turn the distributor upside down so youíre looking at the back of it. Notice how the distributor drive has a wide side and the tang is offset? Turn the distributor drive so the wide side is towards the condenser. Position a straight edge on this wide side (holding it snug up against the tang) in such a way that the straight edge extends to the outside of the drivers side of the distributor housing. Rotate the distributor drive and straight edge until there is exactly 3/8Ē from the top of the driverís side distributor mounting hole to the straight edge. This is 4 degrees BTDC. Holding the distributor drive and distributor firmly so they cannot move, slide the advance screw/plate up and down until the continuity light just flickers. This is when the left set of points are just breaking open and is when the distributor fires. Tighten the advance screw/plate. In Denver, I just adjust the vacuum brake adjuster out until the engine pings (detonation) under 35-40 mph high gear acceleration and then turn it back in one-half turn. This adjusts for altitude as well as the type of fuel weíreusing. The vacuum controlled centrifugal weights should be adjusted to be 25 to 28 degrees at 2000 rpm at sea level.

DETONATION: Detonation is the uncontrolled burning of fuel during combustion. It can lead to pre-ignition, ďrunning onĒ,burned pistons, cracked piston skirts, and deform piston ring grooves/lands. Sometimes itís hard to detect light detonation while driving due to road noise etc.. However,detonation will leave itís mark in the spark plugs. This appears as a dark ring around the porcelain on the inside of the plug. If a detonation ring is present, retard the spark or possibly go to a colder plug or possibly increase the main jet size or increase the octane of the fuel youíreusing... . or do a mixture of them all! If your compression is really high like mine, I have to ad an octane enhancer when I go down to a lower altitude. My 9.95:1 compression really sounds off when I get near sea level!!!!!!

COIL CONNECTIONS:
On a positive ground system, the feed from the ignition switch is to connect to the negative marked terminal on the coil. If connected wrong, the coil output will be about 14% less at idle. This percent of reduced coil output increases to as much as 30% as rpmís increase. The decreased coil output causes hard starting and poor performance.

COIL TESTING USING OHMS:
Coils can be checked using the Ohm function of a VOM. To measure primary resistance, connect one lead to the ignition terminal of the coil and the other to the distributor terminal of the coil. The resistance should be between 0.7 and 0.8 Ohms.
To measure the secondary resistance, connect one lead to either the distributor or ignition terminal of the coil and the other lead is inserted into the high tension tower. It must make contact with the metal inside. The resistance should be 6500 to 7500 Ohms. If either measurement falls outside these values, the coil is probably on itís way to being junk or has already arrived. These ohm values are only for genuine Ford coils since each manufacturer has different values for their product. This is not a fail safe test, but Iíve used this for years as a guide for coils with good results. Itís especially quick and easy for use at a swap meet.

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  #210  
Old 03-01-2011, 11:34 AM
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I needed to make a shaft with a 3/8" fine thread on one end and a flared shape on the other end. I don't have a lathe to make it so I chucked a piece of 1/2" rod in my drill press and used my angle grinder to knock off enough material to get close to the 3/8" thickness I wanted. I finished the turning with first a course file then a fine file until I got to the desired 3/8" thickness. I drilled a hole in a 2X4 the same width as the rod to support the lower part of the rod as I turned. After I turned the rod to the desired width I cut off the excess rod that was chucked in the drive chuck. For the flared end I turned the other end of rod to the desired width, welded a washer and chucked that end into the drill press chuck and used the angle grinder to sculpt it to the shape I needed and again finished it off with different grade files.

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49 F-2 pickup/48 F-1 panel truck
48/51 F-4 flatbed (2 in 1)/49 8N tractor

www.fatfenderedtrucks.com

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