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Old 04-26-2006, 02:23 AM
J6Szczecin J6Szczecin is offline
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Crankshaft Torque?

So I am working on some plans for a hybrid ranger and I want to add an electric motor-generator to a 2.3L engine. I was wondering if anyone knows what kind of torque can be applied to the front of the crankshaft. By this I mean, the front pulley where the serpentine belt attaches. Since this would be a motor-generator, there would be both positive and negative torques (ie. torque both opposing and assisting the torque produced by the ICE). The accessories; power steering, AC, water pump; would be powered seperately by smaller electrical motors so there would be no need for the serpentine belt. Also, the pulley would probably be replaced with some sort of gear to handle the additional torque. If anyone has any idea about this it would be appreciated.
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Old 04-26-2006, 06:49 AM
kotzy kotzy is offline
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Anything that pulls on the crank harder than the AC compressor would in my mind
be too much. I think the crank would fail. To drive the truck the load on the
small end of the shaft would be to great. You have a good idea but I think
you need to look to the opposite end of the crank.
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Old 04-26-2006, 05:43 PM
J6Szczecin J6Szczecin is offline
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Yeah that's what I was thinking as well. The only thing about attaching it to the rear of the engine is that it would be difficult to design so that the clutch and transmission could still be attached. For the design I am planning on, the motor-generator would have to be pre-clutch. I just was wondering if anyone has any idea what kind of torque can be applied accross the length of the crankshaft without failure. I assume that the failure point would be because the front output of the shaft is smaller than the connecting points from the 1st to 4th cylinder and beyond.

Also, at what rpm does the stock engine controller limit the throttle of the engine to prevent any increase in engine rpm?

Last edited by J6Szczecin; 04-26-2006 at 05:47 PM.
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Old 04-26-2006, 06:53 PM
J6Szczecin J6Szczecin is offline
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Oh, by the way, the engine is a stock 96 2.3L with the dual plug head, followed by the stock five speed manual
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Old 04-26-2006, 06:53 PM
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Go Back   Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums > Performance, Engines & Troubleshooting > Other Ford Engines > 4 Cylinder Engines

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