Go Back   Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums > General > Garage & Workshop
Sign in using an external account
Register Forgot Password?


Garage & Workshop Tips & Ideas for the garage or workshop. No Truck Tech Discussion

Welcome to Ford-Trucks Forums!
Welcome to Ford-Trucks.com.

You are currently viewing our forums as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join the Ford-Trucks Forums community today!





 
Reply
 
 
 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 04-20-2004, 08:54 PM
bsprowl bsprowl is offline
Senior User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Sanford
Posts: 429
bsprowl is starting off with a positive reputation.
How would you silence an Air Compressor?

I'm designing a new garage and my neighborhood is quiet. I normally just stick them in a small closet that is vented to the outside. But my patio is on one side of the garage, the neighors deck is on the other.

So I'm looking at how to best isolate the noise when I build the closet it will be in. This closet will also hold the heater/ac, etc.

Suggestions?

thanks

Bob
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-20-2004, 09:15 PM
Torque1st's Avatar
Torque1st Torque1st is offline
Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 30,260
Torque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to behold
First off get a belt drive compressor. The oilless versions are like jackhammers.

Next get a big air inlet filter and wrap open cell foam around it. Most of the noise comes from the suction side of a std compressor. Any part of the inlet filter that can resonate or vibrate will transmit the sound. You can muffle it but you still have to get air into the inlet

For the closet use 2x6 sill plate and top plate. Double stud with 2x4 studs and insulate with fiberglass. Check in a home handyman book about how to make soundproof walls. Sheet rock or siding on both sides. make sure you have good airflow thru the closet. If you have room line the inside of the closet with more fiberglass insulation. Spray the surface of the fiberglass lightly with some urethane spray paint to keep the dust down.

If you can get the sound to bounce around corners into fiberglass absorbing pads in any vent opening it helps also.

Remember you have to get to the compressor to service and drain it

A hollow core door is a big resonant sound transmitter, -very bad!
__________________
"Beam me up Scotty. There's no intelligent life down here..."
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-20-2004, 09:17 PM
triton_2002's Avatar
triton_2002 triton_2002 is offline
Postmaster
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: South Texas
Posts: 2,977
triton_2002 is starting off with a positive reputation.
Plenty of insulation (foam type) on the walls and ceiling would help alot. Not sure if you could actually quite down the compressor itself, there may be some "low noise" compressors out there?
__________________
2002 F-150 Supercab 5.4 Triton V8
Arizona Biege
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-20-2004, 09:35 PM
bsprowl bsprowl is offline
Senior User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Sanford
Posts: 429
bsprowl is starting off with a positive reputation.
The Compressor is going to be one of the big, two stage, 175 PSI ones with iron lines (NO PCV) to several places. Thinking about lining the closet with ceiling tile.

Bob
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-20-2004, 10:40 PM
Torque1st's Avatar
Torque1st Torque1st is offline
Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 30,260
Torque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to behold
Ceiling tile is OK but raw fiberglass is better. It is harder to work around tho Make sure you use a rubber line between the compressor and the iron line heading up the wall. Put a shutoff valve on both ends of the rubber line, but if not at least put one on the compressor side. Make a drip leg on the iron line and put a small drain valve on it. The rubber line should not touch anything. The rubber line shoud drain back into the tank or the drip leg. Secure the iron pipe very well with pipe straps.
__________________
"Beam me up Scotty. There's no intelligent life down here..."
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-20-2004, 11:18 PM
eehoepp eehoepp is offline
Elder User
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Tottenham Ontario Canada
Posts: 586
eehoepp is starting off with a positive reputation.
A friend of mine assembled his own 2HP 80 gal air compressor from pieces parts. When it came to the intake filter he decided to get a little creative. He used a street elbow, a long nipple and some thin plate and and an air filter from a lawn tractor to replicate the look of an open element air cleaner from atop a carburetor, only in miniature. Somehow, he hit on just the right configuration and the compressor is so quiet you can have a normal conversation right beside it when it is running. It also pumps up in an incredibly short time for this small pump/big tank combo.

I think he essentially built a velocity stack for the pump and stumbled onto exactly the right length of inlet pipe. If you can spend some time doing some trial and error work, you can probably find the right intake pipe length for your compressor. Or if you know the formulas and can do the math to calculate the length of a velocity stack, go for it.

A couple of years ago I assembled a 2HP 10gal compressor for my dad from stuff I scavenged or bought cheap and it was really quiet, too. My own store-bought compressor is incredible clattering rattling headache. It almost drives me out of the garage when it kicks on. I've been tempted to try to duplicate Keith's intake for my own compressor, but I can't seem to find the time...

If you build yourself a closet, I have a couple of other suggestions. Use 2x6 top & bottom plates for the walls, but use 2x4 studs on 12" centers. One stud should be flush to the outside of the plate and the next flush to the inside. This way the outside wall surface and the inside wall surface are isolated and the sound pressure that moves the inside wall does not get transmitted and radiated from the outside wall. Of course the stud cavities should be filled with fiberglass batts for absorption. I would use pegboard for the inside wall surface. It will keep cleaner than bare fiberglass batts, but will not echo the sound inside the closet the way sheetrock will - echoes inside will find its way out of your air vents. Plus you can use the pegboard to hang stuff for general storage. Stuff hanging on the inside walls will also help break up the sound bouncing around inside the closet.

Good luck with your project.

Cheers.
Eric
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-20-2004, 11:37 PM
utbroncodriver utbroncodriver is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 23
utbroncodriver is starting off with a positive reputation.
when you have something as loud as a compressor the vibrations will just travel through the studs so regular insulation alone won't do much. the best thing to do is hang RC channel across your studs then hang soundboard to that and sheetrock over that the RC will stop the vibrations from coming from the studs to the sheetrock and into the room if you want it almost totally soundproof do this on both sides of the walls
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-21-2004, 03:15 AM
Torque1st's Avatar
Torque1st Torque1st is offline
Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 30,260
Torque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to beholdTorque1st is a splendid one to behold
Well that's two of us now that have suggested that 2x6 top and bottom with 2x4 stud walls. It is a common construction technique. Check in that handyman book for specifics like I suggested above. It wouldn't be a bad idea to do your whole garage like that in case you do any banging around in there.

A fake ceiling or insulation in the roof will help dampen transmission thru that structure also. That RC channel construction mentioned by utbroncodriver would even be better.

That pegboard would allow the sound pulses to dissipate into the fiberglass inside the wall.

I have made a number of machine enclosures over the years for industrial machinery. I never tried pegboard inside them because I couldn't use it for flammability reasons. I have used expanded metal over the fiberglass.
__________________
"Beam me up Scotty. There's no intelligent life down here..."
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-21-2004, 03:02 PM
nick88f150 nick88f150 is offline
Posting Guru
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: fremont ohio
Posts: 1,139
nick88f150 is starting off with a positive reputation.
i thgouth they made silencers for compressors?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-21-2004, 08:53 PM
rikfish's Avatar
rikfish rikfish is offline
Posting Guru
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,146
rikfish is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.
I worked installing equipment in dental offices for a few years, including compressors. Most manufacturers made silencing hoods that would fit over the compressor. We also would heavily insulate the closet (or area) where the compressor was installed. The hoods were metal, with fiberglass insulation inside. These hoods were lined of course to keep the fiberglass contained. So, I would recommend both insulating the closet, build a loose hood that fits over the compressor yet allows free air flow to the intake. One other consideration is to use rubber isolation feet on the tank. By isolating the tank from the floor you will reduce both vibration and noise levels. Some offices where noise was a serious issue, we also used sound deadening foam panels, especially where the compressor room shared a common wall with another space.

Hope this is of some help to you.....
__________________
rikfish
'03 F150 4X4 XL, 5.4 etc....
'01 E350 Ext. 15 pass., XL, SD, 5.4 etc.....
68 Mustang Coupe, 200-6, not much else! (work in S L O W progress)
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 04-21-2004, 09:50 PM
eehoepp eehoepp is offline
Elder User
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Tottenham Ontario Canada
Posts: 586
eehoepp is starting off with a positive reputation.
Hockey pucks make good isolation feet for air compressors. I used some under a 10 HP 120 gal unit at work. I snugged the anchor bolt nuts to the concrete floor first, so I counter-bored the underside of the pucks to clear the nuts. The compressor then sat on fender washers on the pucks. The anchor bolts went through the tank feet and were fitted with a washer and double-nutted loose to the feet. The double nuts and washers were there to stop the compressor from tipping, but were not tight to the compressor feet so vibrations would not get coupled to the floor.

It worked extremely well. When the compressor was pumping, you could barely feel any vibrations when standing right beside it.

Hockey pucks are surprisingly easy to drill (the rubber curls off the drill quite nicely) and cost about a buck each, which is really reasonable for a chunk of rubber one inch thick and three inches in diameter.

Cheers,
Eric
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 04-22-2004, 09:10 AM
Howdy Howdy is offline
Posting Guru
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Oregon
Posts: 2,007
Howdy has a good reputation on FTE.Howdy has a good reputation on FTE.Howdy has a good reputation on FTE.
Great thread! I've got one of the diaphram compressors and it's so noisy it does drive me out of the garage, so I've been thinking about a soundproof enclosure, too. I've got all my materials for a good plumbed air suppy system, but I need to find a permenant place to quiet the thing down.

The wall ideas so far sound great. I've been trying to figure out a good vent system for the closet. The pegboard posted idea kind of clicked. If I was to frame an opening and then build a baffle inside, using multiple layers of pegboard, staggered, with about a 3/8 airspace between, it might do the trick. The pegboard I have has 3/16 holes on 1 inch centers. Anyone know how to calc. how small that opening can be? Like a rough square meter/cfm or something?

Last edited by Howdy; 04-22-2004 at 09:12 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 04-22-2004, 09:25 AM
Big Blue E350 Big Blue E350 is offline
Junior User
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Tulsa, Ok
Posts: 56
Big Blue E350 is starting off with a positive reputation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by utbroncodriver
the best thing to do is hang RC channel across your studs then hang soundboard to that and sheetrock over that the RC will stop the vibrations from coming from the studs to the sheetrock and into the room if you want it almost totally soundproof do this on both sides of the walls
rather than fiberglass insul, I would reccomend using Acousti-blok which you can look up online, They have, in my opinion, the best sound dampening material on the market for the price. its something to look at.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 04-22-2004, 05:38 PM
68 351 bronc 68 351 bronc is offline
Elder User
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Colville
Posts: 917
68 351 bronc is starting off with a positive reputation.
a 2 stage 175 psi compressor will make a huge amount of heat. You will need to keep the unit cool to help with the longevity of the pump and motor and to increase eficiancy.
I have a 25 cfm Champion. It turns a slower rpm than my old sears compressor, and is quieter. But it will heat a 6X14 compressor shed +15degrees in a half hour. Stick it in a closet and it would cook the pump in no time.
__________________
2001 F250 V-10 auto XLT 4X4

68 Bronco GT40 351w, NV3550 5sp, sweet!!!
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 04-22-2004, 06:34 PM
turboglide turboglide is offline
Senior User
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: N. E. Ohio
Posts: 115
turboglide is new and has a neutral reputation at this point.
The "quieter" compressors run at 1750 rpm or less. The lower priced compressors run at 3450 rpm and make 100% more noise and heat. Make sure you put the compressor on rubber pads to stop the noise from transfering thru the floor, use a flexible line from the compressor to the piping in the garage if you plumb it in and if you have an attic above the garage you can extend the air intake thru the ceiling and put the air filter up there. I just did this with my Saylor-Beal 2 stage and I am very happy with the noise level. I was going to put the whole unit in the attic but at 700 lbs. I canned the idea. I would try this first before I wasted time making a room for it. The heat and a/c will already waste enough garage space. Besides when the neighbors get used to the sound of impacts,grinders and muffler cutters that you run with the air compressor the compressor itself will be music to their ears!
__________________
These are my Ford's
04 F250 CCLB 6.0 Lariat 4x4 Loaded except RVAD & Aux Idle
Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2004, 06:34 PM
 
 
 
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Central A/C condensation mildew problem jsutton General NON-Automotive Conversation 19 08-04-2011 12:33 AM
Return to FTE and update F250Rob 1948 - 1956 F1, F100 & Larger F-Series Trucks 14 02-01-2008 12:03 PM
To Enclose Air Compressor or Not tincup703 Garage & Workshop 9 02-11-2007 11:25 PM
The Little Boy MisterCMK General NON-Automotive Conversation 3 10-24-2004 04:10 PM
Garage Safety Rosati Garage & Workshop 14 03-08-2002 09:48 PM


Go Back   Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums > General > Garage & Workshop

Tags
air, canned, compressor, floor, garage, hang, hockey, low, noise, pucks, silence, silencing, small, soundproofing, truck

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7 AC1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertising - Terms of Use - Privacy Statement - Jobs
This forum is owned and operated by Internet Brands, Inc., a Delaware corporation. It is not authorized or endorsed by the Ford Motor Company and is not affiliated with the Ford Motor Company or its related companies in any way. FordŽ is a registered trademark of the Ford Motor Company.

vbulletin Admin Backup