Go Back   Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums > Misc. > Clutch, Transmission, Differential, Axle & Transfer Case
Sign in using an external account
Register Forgot Password?


Clutch, Transmission, Differential, Axle & Transfer Case SPONSORED BY:

Welcome to Ford-Trucks Forums!
Welcome to Ford-Trucks.com.

You are currently viewing our forums as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join the Ford-Trucks Forums community today!





 
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 06-20-2003, 03:26 PM
digger880 digger880 is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Fairfax, VA
Posts: 3
digger880 is starting off with a positive reputation.
1993 Ranger transmission

How can the transmission fluid in my truck leak into the crankcase?
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 06-20-2003, 03:57 PM
oppy's Avatar
oppy oppy is offline
Posting Guru
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Scenic Wisconsin
Posts: 1,131
oppy is starting off with a positive reputation.
1993 Ranger transmission

I don't think it can, unless it's getting there through the radiator, and in that case you'd also have antifreeze in it. Even then, it'd be a stretch.

How do you know there's ATF in your crankcase?
__________________
02 F250 4X4 SC 7.3 PSD
93 F150 4X4 SC 5.0
93 Ranger STX 4X4 4.0
90 BII wheelin' rig
68 F250 4X2 360
68 F100 4X2 360
92 Ford NH L553 Loader
I bleed Ford Blue
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 06-21-2003, 12:59 AM
Hooked-on-4WD Hooked-on-4WD is offline
Junior User
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Bay Area, West Coast
Posts: 99
Hooked-on-4WD is starting off with a positive reputation.
1993 Ranger transmission

Not able to speak from personal experience but, I've heard from other forums that fluid can pass through the ruptured (rubber) diaphram inside the transmission vacuum modulator.

It then passes through the vacuum hose leading to the engine's intake manifold, where, over time, it seeps past piston rings and into the crankcase. You should also be noticing the transmission fluid dropping in level as it's driven, assuming you're monitoring that as well, though there's no evidence of an external leak (puddles, etc).

It's easy to check by finding the vacuum line which leads down to the transmission case and disconnect it from the intake manifold fitting. Inspect inside the hose for transmission fluid. If it doesn't readily drip from the hose, use a toothpick or similar clean (wooden) stick to check inside the hose for the presence of fluid. If you find ANY, replace the vacuum modulator.

It's usually found on one of the sides of the transmission, down close to the oil pan bolt-flange. The modulator should be easy to purchase from most auto parts supply stores.
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 06-29-2003, 12:04 AM
supermodulation supermodulation is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Middlesex, N.J.
Posts: 12
supermodulation is starting off with a positive reputation.
1993 Ranger transmission

YOU ARE RIGHT Hooked-on-4WD!!!!
I have a 93' Ranger XLT V6 4.0L 4X4 with original 67K miles.
I had the same problem. Every 2 weeks I was adding a
quart of transmission fluid. To monitor the problem I put
a piece of cardboard under the trans but only a few drops.
At first I thought both the trans and engine were blown because
everytime I started the truck first in the morning I had a BIG white cloud of smoke. I went to the dealer and some tranmission
shops, all they said it was going to cost me about $2k.
So I decided to put on my backyard mechanic hat on.
I noticed on the vacuum tree all the rubber plugs were dry
rotting so I decided to replace them, When I removed the bottom vacuum plug about 2oz fluid came out. I removed all the vacuum lines and found the steel line from the transmission vacuum modulator was filled to the top with transmission fluid.
The modulator was $37 bucks from the dealer + 2 hours
of my labor and no more BIG WHITE SMOKE CLOUD!!!!!
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 06-29-2003, 08:03 AM
digger880 digger880 is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Fairfax, VA
Posts: 3
digger880 is starting off with a positive reputation.
1993 Ranger transmission

Very true. My mechanic found the vacuum modulator's diaphragm ruptured and the fluid was being sucked up to the head and then draining into the crankcase.
All okay now. Thanks everyone for your help.
R.G.McDonald
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 06-29-2003, 10:14 AM
supermodulation supermodulation is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Middlesex, N.J.
Posts: 12
supermodulation is starting off with a positive reputation.
1993 Ranger transmission

I have to say I never seen any trans fluid in my crank.
How many miles does your truck have?
I have bean asking everyone about this problem but no answers.
It took me about a year, SLOW learning curve.

On another subject if your intested I went stainless steel from the headers back. I have photo's of my upgrades.

James
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2003, 10:14 AM
Reply

Go Back   Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums > Misc. > Clutch, Transmission, Differential, Axle & Transfer Case

Tags
1993, 4x4, 50, 92, 93, explorer, f150, fluid, ford, line, located, modulator, ranger, tranny, transimission, transmission, transmissions, vacum, vacuum

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertising - Terms of Use - Privacy Statement - Jobs
This forum is owned and operated by Internet Brands, Inc., a Delaware corporation. It is not authorized or endorsed by the Ford Motor Company and is not affiliated with the Ford Motor Company or its related companies in any way. FordŽ is a registered trademark of the Ford Motor Company.

vbulletin Admin Backup