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Best combo for deep snow

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  #31  
Old 10-23-2013, 06:55 PM
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Naw... No need for that. Just a big difference of opinion.
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  #32  
Old 10-23-2013, 07:10 PM
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a used trailer with a used snowmobile to tow behind your Super Duty.......Buy it in late spring when the snow is melting to save even more money. Probably the best "budget friendly" way to get through the deep stuff...
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  #33  
Old 10-23-2013, 07:30 PM
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Move to SC. Its 90-100* in "late spring".
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  #34  
Old 10-24-2013, 07:51 PM
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I bought a set of Yokohama geolander I/Ts 315/75r16 they are some bad a** tires they changed the way I thought about driving threw or climbing over a 10 foot pile of snow. I still have them I don't know why because I don't drive the truck in the winter now.
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  #35  
Old 01-18-2014, 04:11 AM
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I'm scouting around for opinions for my next set of tires, I hate the idea of having to keep two sets of tires but after the DW slid the old F-150 off the road, I need a better snow/ice tire solution.

So I see a vote for the Geolanders, any other options would be helpful!
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  #36  
Old 01-18-2014, 03:01 PM
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I like my Wild Country XTXs on snow and ice.

Add some chains, and I can go places in two wheel drive that I could never go in 4 wheel drive without them.


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  #37  
Old 01-19-2014, 09:08 AM
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Define "deep snow".
Here in Atlanta 2" is deep. When I lived in VT I didn't call it deep until it got to close to 18-24".
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  #38  
Old 01-19-2014, 09:59 AM
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Yes, what is "deep"? 6 inches is completely different than 6 feet.

With my BFG A/T KO's I have been through 3 feet of snow with 1500 lbs of weight in the bed. I had full traction and no difficulties turning, stopping or starting again.

With no weight in the bed I've been through 2 feet of snow with the same traction ability.

Have2 is correct about the chains though. For really deep snow and wheeled vehicles, nothing beats chains. Only thing better is tracks.

Also ballast weight makes a big difference. 500 or 1000 lbs of weight in the bed really helps.
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  #39  
Old 01-19-2014, 11:58 AM
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going through 3ft of powder/dry snow is a lot different than 3ft wet snow 44" mudders on a light weight jeep is a good option some times.
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  #40  
Old 01-27-2014, 09:18 PM
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There are two things to maintain when driving through snow:
1. Traction. This requires weight on the tires
2. Ground clearance. Pack snow in under the vehicle and it very quickly adds to the load on the driveline causing tires to slip more and then the tires dig holes. Then you loose number 1. No weight on the tires, no traction.

In truly "deep" snow (12"+) tire floatation is your only option. If your tires cut through you loose more ground clearance and end up with snow packing underneath. You have to keep the undercarriage and axles from plowing through the snow.

Get tire chains - front and rear. The extra clawing will get you a lot more traction, a lot more pulling power, and in turn keep you on top of the snow better for the same size tire footprint without. They don't add to the "floating" ability, per se, just that the extra clawing gives more traction to keep you moving.
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  #41  
Old 02-18-2014, 05:15 PM
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what are a good brand of chains?
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  #42  
Old 02-18-2014, 10:40 PM
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I have a full set (front/rear) of these:
HEAVY TRUCK CHAINS

I don't know a whole lot about chains, but what I can share is that they need to be sized up to your tires. They some a generic length and then you adjust to fit. It would be very beneficial to have a pair of tire chain pliers (big heavy duty ones for big chains). This is so you can efficiently split the cross chain links in your sizing, and have crimping power for repairs later.

When I sized up my chains I used a cut-off wheel on an angle grinder to trim the chains down to fit. In doing so I cut the attaching link on one too many cross chains. Now I don't have any spare links because they are all cut...

Also, you will note that there are two different styles of tensioning methods. The chains I have use a single "cam" to pull tight. There are styles of chains that have multiple "cams" around the circumference that use a tool, a big L wrench, to rotate. These are by far better because you can tighten the chain all the way around the tire.

My method with the single cam chains is to put them on as good as I can, then stop about 2-300ft later and go around to all of them for an adjustment. After the adjustment they are pretty tight, but I know if there were more cams it would be even better since one cam is still one point around a round tire that gets "tight".
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  #43  
Old 02-19-2014, 07:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KC8QVO View Post

Get tire chains - front and rear. The extra clawing will get you a lot more traction, a lot more pulling power, and in turn keep you on top of the snow better for the same size tire footprint without. They don't add to the "floating" ability, per se, just that the extra clawing gives more traction to keep you moving.
The chains will not help you stay on top of the snow per say. If you spin a tire with chains, you quickly dig down to the ground. That's why I like them, you can push through a lot more snow than with just tires. And if you stop going forward, 9 times out of 10 you can back out of it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by KC8QVO View Post
I have a full set (front/rear) of these:
HEAVY TRUCK CHAINS

I don't know a whole lot about chains, but what I can share is that they need to be sized up to your tires. They some a generic length and then you adjust to fit. It would be very beneficial to have a pair of tire chain pliers (big heavy duty ones for big chains). This is so you can efficiently split the cross chain links in your sizing, and have crimping power for repairs later.

When I sized up my chains I used a cut-off wheel on an angle grinder to trim the chains down to fit. In doing so I cut the attaching link on one too many cross chains. Now I don't have any spare links because they are all cut...

Also, you will note that there are two different styles of tensioning methods. The chains I have use a single "cam" to pull tight. There are styles of chains that have multiple "cams" around the circumference that use a tool, a big L wrench, to rotate. These are by far better because you can tighten the chain all the way around the tire.

My method with the single cam chains is to put them on as good as I can, then stop about 2-300ft later and go around to all of them for an adjustment. After the adjustment they are pretty tight, but I know if there were more cams it would be even better since one cam is still one point around a round tire that gets "tight".
Good info here, the key is to keep them as tight as possible to keep them from flopping. Put chains on before you need them, so you can drive a ways and readjust them a couple times.

As for best brand, idk, I know get the ones with the biggest cross links that you can afford. I run semi truck chains that I cut down to fit. They have the multiple cams to tighten them down. They can be very tight.
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  #44  
Old 02-22-2014, 07:24 AM
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with the cams a trick i use is to just put moderate pressure on the tightening tool,then i gently tap the end of the cam with a modest size hammer to bring it around. i can get them tight enough they actually suck into the tire if i want to. my chain tool is homemade about a foot long, on the other end it has two pins for grabbing the boomer that links the two ends together,lets me get that much tighter to begin with.
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  #45  
Old 02-26-2014, 01:17 PM
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I drive studded snows and even in deep rarely need chains - and they're great on ice (MC 265/75/20). If the terrain is steep hills and 3+' deep then chains will def make a difference. The key when driving in snow is not to get stuck in 4x4. I tend to drive in 4x2 and when stuck shift into 4...if u get stuck in 4, ull need a winch or shovel.
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