Go Back   Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums > Performance, Engines & Troubleshooting > FE & FT Big Block V8 (332, 352, 360, 390, 406, 410, 427, 428)
Sign in using an external account
Register Forgot Password?


Welcome to Ford-Trucks Forums!
Welcome to Ford-Trucks.com.

You are currently viewing our forums as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join the Ford-Trucks Forums community today!





 
Reply
 
 
 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 12-05-2011, 02:52 PM
BigMikeUGA BigMikeUGA is offline
Senior User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 258
BigMikeUGA is starting off with a positive reputation.
Help removing distributor and intake from my 352

I've been inside a lot of different engines, but never an Ford FE. I'd like to know I'm doing this right before I start busting bolts loose. The engine is on a stand as I have it out of my '65 F250 to replace all of the seals and gaskets and then paint it. It was rebuilt about 10 years ago and has about 30k miles on it.

I have the valve covers off. I turned the engine over to TDC and both the valves on the #1 cylinder and closed. I marked the rotor button for the right position when reinstalling it.

The pushrods going through the intake just looks weird to me after working on "orange" engines for 30 years. I assume that I just loosen the bolts holding down the rockers and remove the pushrods, then remove the manifold.

Sound right?

Click the image to open in full size.

Plugs looked pretty good.

Click the image to open in full size.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-05-2011, 03:08 PM
BigMikeUGA BigMikeUGA is offline
Senior User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 258
BigMikeUGA is starting off with a positive reputation.
Found this on FordFE

Quote:
Intake Manifold Removal and Replacement


For several days before you actually start the removal, soak the distributor opening in the manifold with a rust buster (PB Blaster is recommended). [Also soak the top bolts for the exhaust manifolds if you're removing the heads.]
First crank the engine around to where the timing mark is at Top Dead Center and the distributor rotor is pointing at the number one plug wire on the cap.
Note where the vacuum advance is pointing and where the number one wire is sitting. (Often the factory position for these are not what you have.)
When you remove the distributor the rotor will turn as the gear is at an angle. Note the amount it turns as it will need to be offset this much during assembly.
Now disconnect the battery.
Drain the coolant and be sure it is below the deck by removing the small screw in plugs at the bottom edge of the cooling jacket. If they are stuck - as they often are - then knock out a freeze plug. If there is coolant in the block it will run into the cylinder and down into the rings. While not a disaster, it just is another mess to screw with and I like to see the cylinder walls as they were when the engine was running, and not after I've cleaned up the coolant and wiped out any signs of problems.
Drain the radiator, remove the valve covers, carburetor, thermostat housing, distributor, rock arm assemblies and push rods (and keep track of which side that stuff came off and which push rod belongs to what valve), wiring that runs across the intake manifold.
Remove the temperature sending unit, and any heater hose connections, etc., that you want to install on another manifold (they're a lot easier to remove while the manifold is still bolted down).
Finally the intake manifold itself can come off. To loosen it use a pry bar or large screw driver at the center and lift each side loose. If you have a cast iron manifold remember that that sucker is heavy around 80 pounds so plan to struggle. I place a folded old blanket on top of the fender so I can set it down without denting the fender. If I'm lifting it out by myself, I actually stand inside the engine compartment.
You've got to clean the head gasket surfaces, block ends, valve cover gasket surface, and thermostat housing gasket surface.
Make sure the gasket fits OK at the bottom of the ports on the manifold and heads. This step should not to be skipped as some manifold-head combinations require a special gasket.
Dry, test installation is next to let you check for manifold alignment if your using a different manifold or if the old one had sealing problems. Make sure the manifold port faces line up parallel to the heads. Use the distributor to align the manifold front to rear especially if is a replacement manifold.
Re-assembly is next. Use carburetor/throttle body cleaner to get the gasket mating surfaces, especially the block end surfaces and the undersides of the end of the manifold, free of any oil so the gasket sealer will seal better. I use either VersaChem 99 or Permatex Ultra Blue 77 and build up a bead half again as thick as the dry fitting showed me that I need. I let it dry several minutes before putting the manifold on.
After the intake manifold is in place, install the distributor before the manifold bolts as the distributor determines the front to rear alignment for the intake manifold.
Most everything else is straight forward, just get things back where they came from.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-05-2011, 05:47 PM
Sleepy445FE's Avatar
Sleepy445FE Sleepy445FE is offline
Posting Guru
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Axtell, TX
Posts: 1,436
Sleepy445FE is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.Sleepy445FE is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.
That's a pretty good writeup.
You don't have to completely remove the rocker shafts to get the pushrods out though. They'll loosen enough that you can slide the pushrods out. As it says keep them in order. I just use a box with 16 holes in it that are labeled so I don't get em mixed up.

MAKE SURE you loosen the rocker shaft bolts very evenly, only 1/2 to 1 turn per bolt at a time in order from front to back or back to front. The shafts are pretty easy to bend if you try and go too fast. Here's a good article about it FE valvtrain install/removal
Some people use the end gaskets on the intake manifold with success, but the majority of us don't. They just tend to leak more or pop out after time. I use a bead of The Right Stuff on the ends and have never had a problem with leaks. Make sure the gaskets that mate intake to head don't block off the oil drainback holes on each side. I also fatten the bead a bit at the "corner" where intake/block/head meet to ensure no leaks.

TQ specs-
Rocker shaft bolts 45ft/lbs
Intake manifold bolts 35ft/lbs cast iron, 25ft/lbs aluminum
__________________
Jeremy

1976 F250 4x4 Ranger XLT. 445FE, NP435/205, D44/60 4.10
AKA the never ending project.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-05-2011, 06:01 PM
BigMikeUGA BigMikeUGA is offline
Senior User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 258
BigMikeUGA is starting off with a positive reputation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleepy445FE View Post
That's a pretty good writeup.
You don't have to completely remove the rocker shafts to get the pushrods out though. They'll loosen enough that you can slide the pushrods out. As it says keep them in order. I just use a box with 16 holes in it that are labeled so I don't get em mixed up.

MAKE SURE you loosen the rocker shaft bolts very evenly, only 1/2 to 1 turn per bolt at a time in order from front to back or back to front. The shafts are pretty easy to bend if you try and go too fast. Here's a good article about it FE valvtrain install/removal
Some people use the end gaskets on the intake manifold with success, but the majority of us don't. They just tend to leak more or pop out after time. I use a bead of The Right Stuff on the ends and have never had a problem with leaks. Make sure the gaskets that mate intake to head don't block off the oil drainback holes on each side. I also fatten the bead a bit at the "corner" where intake/block/head meet to ensure no leaks.

TQ specs-
Rocker shaft bolts 45ft/lbs
Intake manifold bolts 35ft/lbs cast iron, 25ft/lbs aluminum
Thanks, I really appreciate the information.

I got the intake off tonight and will get it cleaned up tomorrow. The intake had some carbon on the bottom of it.

Click the image to open in full size.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-06-2011, 07:43 AM
Krewat's Avatar
Krewat Krewat is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Long Island USA
Posts: 34,384
Krewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputationKrewat has a superb reputation
That carbon buildup is the typical mess from the exhaust crossover.

If you're not in a particularly cold part of the country, it could be blocked and not have to deal with it anymore. Aftermarket intakes usually (always?) don't even have one.
__________________
- art k. - Moderator for the Superduty, V10, 6.2L and FE forums
'13 Taurus SHO 3.5L Ecoboost w/Perf Pkg
'01 F250SD SC SB XLT V10 4x4 Volant CAI Hedman headers 5-star custom tunes on SCT X3
'97 Cougar XR7 30th Anniv Edition 4.6L
'74 F250 Highboy FE390 deceased!
I've been wrong before, I'll be wrong again. Just wait and see. ®
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-06-2011, 09:01 AM
BigMikeUGA BigMikeUGA is offline
Senior User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 258
BigMikeUGA is starting off with a positive reputation.
Great info

Quote:
FE's That Bend Push-rods, A Dirty little Secret


Click the image to open in full size.
By William Ballinger
I have heard it said many times that one of the Ford FE's main weaknesses is a propensity for tossing, bending or breaking valve-train push rods. The non-adjustable rocker-shaft assemblies would appear to be the primary culprit. It has also been pointed out that the barrel length of the lifter is longer than it needs to be. While both are true to a point, the factory had procedures to keep these differences from other designs from causing reliability problems.
Involved are specific procedures to unload and pre-load the valve-train, check the actual lifter pre-load specific to it's valve location, and adjust any deficiencies by the use of longer push rods in the specific valve locations that have slack. Of course it's more work than simply turning down a nut, but it's a strong, durable design as long as it is kept within it's design limits, and put together properly. Properly done it can withstand 6000 rpm forays as well or better than any bread and butter factory design. The 428 CJ Mustangs that still run well in Stock-Class drag racing use this design, 'nuff said!
When disassembling an FE valve-train it is important to keep in mind that this adjustment procedure may have been performed in the past. This will cause you to encounter longer push rods at some valve positions. It is important to keep the push rods in order, specific to their positions, until you can determine if they are all the same lengths and in good condition.
Another thing to keep in mind is that the engine due to it's age will likely have been apart before. Many times the proper unload/pre-load procedures have not been followed, and any corrections to lifter pre-load made prior may have been lost due to mixing up the push rods. Check the rocker-shafts for straightness, as a previous assembler may have bent them.
Blueprinting your valve-train this way lets you know what you really have, and whether it's worthy of hard running or not. If you don't do it you will have a pretty good chance of breaking something. Why give more fodder to the Brand X boys? Even if you don't run your engine hard, isn't it nice to know that you can?
It would be a good idea to unload and pre-load your valve-train before checking the valve clearance to eliminate improper pre-load as a factor.


Rocker Shaft Unload and Pre-load.



It is very important that the rocker-shaft be properly unloaded and reloaded to insure proper lifter pre-load and prevent damage to valve-train components. Bring up number one cylinder on the compression stroke to TDC (top dead center), and turn the engine another forty-five degrees beyond to the "XX" mark as shown on the damper. Loosen the passenger side bank rocker-shaft bolts from rear to front two turns at a time until loose. On the drivers side loosen the bolts from front to rear two turns at a time. In my opinion, a couple of 1/2 turn passes in sequence after breaking torque would make the operation a little less traumatic to the components, but it isn't absolutely necessary.
To reload the rocker-shaft, and in the process pre-load the lifters, bring the damper back to number one cylinder TDC, and reverse the procedure specific to each bank. Turn the rocker-shaft support bolts down two turns at time until you reach the specified torque value. As when unloading the shaft, when you get close to full torque, 1/2 turn passes in sequence until full torque is reached would be recommended but not absolutely necessary. Refer to your shop manual for all engine torque specifications, and diagrams if you are unsure of any of these procedures.

Valve Clearance Testing and Adjustment


To check the valve clearance, run the engine to operating temperature, shut off, and bring the crank to number one cylinder TDC compression. Check cylinder 1,3,7,8 intakes and 1,4,5,8 exhausts by pressing down the rocker arm until the lifter bleeds completely down. Clearance between the rocker tip and valve should be between .100 to .200 for all FE's but the '65 to '67 352. The 352 specification is .050 to .150. If there is more slack than is recommended, then a longer push rod is necessary to bring it into specification.
Make sure that the lifter is capable of holding good pressure, and if you are turning the engine hard enough to cause high-rpm pump-up that you're using anti-pump-up lifters. If a certain lifter collapses a lot easier when you compress it, then it will need to be replaced. If you have to replace one, use an engine hoist to handle that lovely triple-A hernia inducing intake manifold. It's about 80 lbs. without the carburetor. I intend to write an article soon on the installation of an FE intake manifold, so keep in touch.
To check the remaining valves, turn the engine 360 degrees (one full revolution) and bring up number six to TDC and check cylinder 2,4,5,6 intakes and 2,3,6,7 exhausts in the same way and to the same specifications.
Love them or cuss them, the FE has been in the exclusive company of the best engines of all time. They still command a very loyal following in the enthusiast sector of automotive and truck interest. Their versatility of application is unmatched by any other design in the history of the automobile. From a NASCAR Torino, to AL's ROOFING's F-600, to Aunt Hildegard's four- door Fairlane. The FE has "been there and done that." Many design cues we see in Ford's latest offering, the Modular, hails back to the FE. From a time when "IRON MEN DON'T WEAR BOW-TIES."
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-06-2011, 02:21 PM
Sleepy445FE's Avatar
Sleepy445FE Sleepy445FE is offline
Posting Guru
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Axtell, TX
Posts: 1,436
Sleepy445FE is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.Sleepy445FE is gaining momentum as a positive member of FTE.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krewat View Post
That carbon buildup is the typical mess from the exhaust crossover.

If you're not in a particularly cold part of the country, it could be blocked and not have to deal with it anymore. Aftermarket intakes usually (always?) don't even have one.
Looking in Jay's book and the Blue Thunder 4v, Edel. F427, Performer, SP2P, Streetmaster, Holley SD, Offy 360 4v, Dual Port, Port O Sonic, and Weiand 7282 all have exhaust crossovers. It would seem more have it then don't.

To OP, like he said you can block it off if you're not in a cold climate.
__________________
Jeremy

1976 F250 4x4 Ranger XLT. 445FE, NP435/205, D44/60 4.10
AKA the never ending project.
Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2011, 02:21 PM
 
 
 
Reply

Go Back   Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums > Performance, Engines & Troubleshooting > FE & FT Big Block V8 (332, 352, 360, 390, 406, 410, 427, 428)

Tags
352, 360, 429, distributor, engine, fe, fe390, ford, frord, frozen, intake, removal, remove, tdc, ti

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7 AC1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertising - Terms of Use - Privacy Statement - Jobs
This forum is owned and operated by Internet Brands, Inc., a Delaware corporation. It is not authorized or endorsed by the Ford Motor Company and is not affiliated with the Ford Motor Company or its related companies in any way. Ford® is a registered trademark of the Ford Motor Company.

vbulletin Admin Backup