Go Back   Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums > Ford Vans and other vehicles > 1968-2013 Full Size Vans
Sign in using an external account
Register Forgot Password?


1968-2013 Full Size Vans Econolines. E150, E250, E350, E450 and E550

Reply
 
 
 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #31  
Old 05-25-2013, 06:19 PM
JWA's Avatar
JWA JWA is online now
Post Fiend
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Reynoldsburg, Ohio
Posts: 6,976
JWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputation
For a similar valve configuration that definitely closes on vacuum application look for a Four Seasons part number 74802. I've purchased several of those from this eBay seller:

Beginning on page 452 of this catalog you can find other valves: [2011 Illustrated Guide] - Powered by PageTurnPro.com (This link will take a few seconds to load---be patient!)

Your check valve should be available just about anywhere parts are sold, NAPA being my main local source. I've not yet needed one of those so no part numbers yet.

HTH
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 05-25-2013, 10:38 PM
maples01's Avatar
maples01 maples01 is offline
Postmaster
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Maryville
Posts: 3,220
maples01 has a good reputation on FTE.maples01 has a good reputation on FTE.maples01 has a good reputation on FTE.
facebook.com/TheCrip Maples01
The blender door has been the easiest repair I've done, I still have the check valve, the PCV ate my arm up, I really hate working on this thing, make me love my 73 much more.
__________________
My wheelchair has yet to stop me from wrenching on my vans.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 06-26-2013, 10:32 PM
Brad2000-E350 Brad2000-E350 is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: St. Pete, FL
Posts: 10
Brad2000-E350 is starting off with a positive reputation.
Thanks for all the information!!!
I have the exact issue on my 2000 E-350... well, this issue, as well as some of the related issues.
This afternoon, I found a cable/hose hanging underneath the rear of the van near the muffler. After a little research, I found that this had previously been attached to the "Evaporative Emission Canister" The end with the connector (which looks like it has a 1 way valve in it), near the small box that says "to canister" on it, was hanging down, but didn't look like it was really damaged. the other end was in a clip above the canister, but not connected to anything and looked like it had been ripped off of something. Anyone know what this hose is? Is it related to the A/C woes in any way?

Part 2:
I haven't pulled the control panel yet, but when I pulled the cover in the dash, it does not seem like I have any vacuum in any of those lines. I also checked the lines at the passenger floor area. Again, did not seem to have any vacuum.
When I shut off the engine, I can hear a slow hiss/leak behind the battery area. There is a vacuum line that runs along that area, but it is not leaking. The hiss only lasts for a minute or so (long enough to lose pressure I assume), but I can't pin point exactly where it's coming from.
I know my next step will be pulling the control panel and checking everything back there, but is there something glaring that I'm missing, or that should also be at the top of my "check next list"?
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 07-05-2013, 09:33 PM
v101998 v101998 is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 2
v101998 is starting off with a positive reputation.
I've had this 1998 E350 van with the V10 engine for over 10 years. I pull a trailer with it, so most of the time I'm into the gas pedal rather heavily. Needless to say, Lot's of pedal means low vacuum, and low vacuum means all the cold air goes on the windshield, and not on to me. I've been putting off fixing this problem for years but finally it got so bad that it would not come off the default defrost position. Trying to find the vacuum leak on the line that goes to the A/C controls seems almost impossible.
So I started under the hood, removed the battery & battery tray, then I went under the vehicle, then under the fender, then through the engine compartment from inside the cab. This was before I Googled the problem and found this web site. To my surprise, it is a much bigger problem than I realized. Judging by this web site, this problem has been resolved in many ways, most of them difficult, time consuming, or expensive.
Here is a procedure that allows you to fix the leaking vacuum line problem in probably an hour or so. The beauty is, you do not have to remove, any A/C or heater component, the dashboard, the headlight, the engine access panel, the front wheel, or the battery. You do not have to drill, cut, or bend any metal. You just need a few tools. I don't know if this would work on all E-series vans or not, but it worked on my Van. Tools & parts you need: a drill motor, small bit (I used an 1/8"), flash light or trouble light, long screwdriver (or punch), "J" hook, in line connector, RTV or other sealant, optional: tape, tie-raps, shrink tubing, Vacuum line, vacuum reservoir, (I got from a junkyard) wrench to remove negative battery terminal. Safety First!
First use procedures listed earlier in this thread to identify where the vacuum leak is. If the leak is between the vacuum line coupling located between the engine oil fill and the windshield washer fill, and where it comes through the fire wall just above the carpeting in the passenger side foot well, this procedure should work for you.
First raise the hood & separate the vacuum line at the junction. Push the left hand piece of separated line towards the passenger side to take the slack out of the line. Go inside the passenger side door remove the right side foot well panel for better access. If you are a big guy or not to flexible you may wish to remove the lower dash panel and metal structure behind it. Caution, there is an airbag above the working area. Looking up under the dashboard, identify where the vacuum line comes through the black plastic ac/ heater box, to the right of the vacuum actuator and below the large damper door. Carefully, pull the line so the grommet that is part of the line, pulls out of the hole. Continue to pull the line until you feel resistance, then push it back in a little bit. Drill small holes in a circular pattern above the existing hole, being careful not to damage the vacuum line. With the long screwdriver push through the thin black plastic that you have just drilled through. Repeat the drilling procedure below the original hole & push through the remaining thin black plastic material. At this point you should have an oblong irregular shaped hole roughly 1" by 2 1/4". pull on the line and you should see the white and black check valve. If you are lucky you may have disconnected the 2 3/4" rubber vacuum hose from the vacuum reservoir. If not cut the rubber hose, being careful not to separate or damage the two black plastic vacuum lines that are connected to the check valve. Use the "J" hook if necessary. With the rubber line disconnected from the valve, and if you have made the hole big enough, you should be able to pull the check valve with lines attached through the opening. Next remove the check valve & insert the inline connector. If the valve is good, save it for later use. If you don't ever want to have a vacuum leak in this area again, use one or more of the following items (tape, shrink tubing, tie raps) to insure there are no leaks or the connector cannot come apart. Take the check valve if it is good and insert it into the separated lines under the hood. Black side of valve toward the engine, white side towards the other line. Plug the other white check valve opening. Hook up battery & go for a test drive. If you feel good about the amount of air that is coming through the dash vents, you are probably ok. I was thrilled, I haven't had that much cold air in my face in years. If you are not happy, go back to the under hood check valve remove the plug and run the rubber vacuum hose to a convenient place and attach the reservoir. I put mine above the power distribution box on the drivers side. Seal up the hole under the dashboard with RTV or what ever sealer you prefer, reattached any panels that were removed. You are through! I'm sure others have used this procedure or a similar one to resolve the vacuum leak problem. Let me know what you think!
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 07-09-2013, 09:32 PM
OSHS OSHS is offline
Senior User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 108
OSHS is starting off with a positive reputation.
I had the same problem last year. I found the vacuum line from the engine on the firewall, just above the evaporator and blower motor housing. I couldn't find it underneath the truck, so I found where it entered the cabin and began pulling. As everyone has stated the rubber hose that connects to the vacuum reservoir was crumbling apart. Rather than try to replace the hose, I simply ordered a new vacuum reservoir from Amazon for about $20 and ran a new hose to the vacuum line that comes off the engine. I tucked the new vacuum reservoir up under the dash (as best I could) in the passenger footwell. I secured it with double-sided tape. The new reservoir is triangular, so it fit well. It is an AC Delco #10403762.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 07-09-2013, 09:53 PM
v101998 v101998 is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 2
v101998 is starting off with a positive reputation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by OSHS View Post
I had the same problem last year. I found the vacuum line from the engine on the firewall, just above the evaporator and blower motor housing. I couldn't find it underneath the truck, so I found where it entered the cabin and began pulling. As everyone has stated the rubber hose that connects to the vacuum reservoir was crumbling apart. Rather than try to replace the hose, I simply ordered a new vacuum reservoir from Amazon for about $20 and ran a new hose to the vacuum line that comes off the engine. I tucked the new vacuum reservoir up under the dash (as best I could) in the passenger footwell. I secured it with double-sided tape. The new reservoir is triangular, so it fit well. It is an AC Delco #10403762.
That sounds like another creative way of solving the leaky vacuum line problem. Nice job!
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 07-09-2013, 10:43 PM
OSHS OSHS is offline
Senior User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 108
OSHS is starting off with a positive reputation.
Thanks V.

Even better, the AC Delco reservoir has the check valves built in. While this might not be the cheapest fix for this problem, it has to be the easiest!
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 07-11-2013, 06:34 AM
JWA's Avatar
JWA JWA is online now
Post Fiend
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Reynoldsburg, Ohio
Posts: 6,976
JWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputation
Quote:
Originally Posted by OSHS View Post
Thanks V.

Even better, the AC Delco reservoir has the check valves built in. While this might not be the cheapest fix for this problem, it has to be the easiest!

Almost never is it cheap and easy!
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 09-04-2013, 05:38 PM
woodfloorman's Avatar
woodfloorman woodfloorman is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 5
woodfloorman is starting off with a positive reputation.
I finally decided to tear into this project today.My vac line coming off motor had already been replaced by another kinda clear/white hose.When I cut the opening in the passenger wheel well I saw the vacuum reservoir but there was no hose attached.The replaced clear/white hose was routed thru here and went inside the firewall at the passenger footwell.

This hose was connected to the factory black hose that goes up to the controls under the access panel on top of the dash.

So as far as I can tell,there is no vacuum reservoir at all.I get good vacuum at all acuaters and after un plugging and re plugging some of the hoses to check for vacuum,the air seems to be blowing stronger than before.

But I still have the same issue of default defrost on accelerating.The only thing I saw when I opened up the wheel well was the flat reservoir...No 3 way check valve....Anybody??????
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 09-05-2013, 07:56 AM
JWA's Avatar
JWA JWA is online now
Post Fiend
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Reynoldsburg, Ohio
Posts: 6,976
JWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputation
The check valve is when you have a reservoir attached. Under acceleration the heater vacuum port on the intake manifold will see a reduction in vacuum which allows the servos or actuators to revert to their normal states. Once the vacuum level returns to that port your servos then travel to the position called for by the Function Control (Heat, Vent, A/C, etc)

The check valve keeps vacuum in the reservoir during acceleration, doesn't let the trapped vacuum leak back into the induction stream.

How's that?
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 09-05-2013, 11:55 AM
woodfloorman's Avatar
woodfloorman woodfloorman is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 5
woodfloorman is starting off with a positive reputation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JWA View Post
The check valve is when you have a reservoir attached. Under acceleration the heater vacuum port on the intake manifold will see a reduction in vacuum which allows the servos or actuators to revert to their normal states. Once the vacuum level returns to that port your servos then travel to the position called for by the Function Control (Heat, Vent, A/C, etc)

The check valve keeps vacuum in the reservoir during acceleration, doesn't let the trapped vacuum leak back into the induction stream.

How's that?
I understand how the system works.
If the reservoir and check valve have been bypassed totally,then you would expect the vacuum to default to defrost under acceleration.What I don't know is if the check valve is built into the vac reservoir and has failed was that the reason for bypassing it?..

If the reservoir does not have a built in check valve,then the check valve had failed.Right?The reservoir doesn't have anyway to fail.Correct?

By the way this is a 2002 E-250...if that helps.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 09-05-2013, 12:23 PM
woodfloorman's Avatar
woodfloorman woodfloorman is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 5
woodfloorman is starting off with a positive reputation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by v101998 View Post
That sounds like another creative way of solving the leaky vacuum line problem. Nice job!

I decided to just order the ac delco part with the built in check valve...Seems to be the simplist way to solve the problem..

Rockauto has it for $12.50 plus shipping...Sears has same part for $52.00
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 09-06-2013, 06:43 AM
JWA's Avatar
JWA JWA is online now
Post Fiend
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Reynoldsburg, Ohio
Posts: 6,976
JWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputationJWA has a superb reputation
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodfloorman View Post
I understand how the system works.
This is a commonly asked issue here which is why I included what seems to be TMI in your case---sorry for that!

The new reservoir should be the cure especially at that huge price difference.

Quote:
Originally Posted by woodfloorman View Post
If the reservoir and check valve have been bypassed totally,then you would expect the vacuum to default to defrost under acceleration.What I don't know is if the check valve is built into the vac reservoir and has failed was that the reason for bypassing it?..
Click the image to open in full size.

A bit after the fact however the diagram/schematic shows a check valve separate from the reservoir. If the check valve fails or the reservoir leaks your condition would exist.

Thanks for the update!
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 09-08-2013, 12:48 PM
woodfloorman's Avatar
woodfloorman woodfloorman is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 5
woodfloorman is starting off with a positive reputation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JWA View Post
This is a commonly asked issue here which is why I included what seems to be TMI in your case---sorry for that!

The new reservoir should be the cure especially at that huge price difference.



Click the image to open in full size.

A bit after the fact however the diagram/schematic shows a check valve separate from the reservoir. If the check valve fails or the reservoir leaks your condition would exist.

Thanks for the update!

Part arrived Saturday works like a charm...The in and out connections on the reservoir are 2 different sizes(1/8"and 1/4" I believe)So I spent more time running down to the auto parts store for hose and adapters..

I tucked it up under the pass side dash and secured it with furnace?a/c tape...Witch I also used on all the hose connections.

Pretty easy fix for a PITA issue.thanks to everyone who contributed info to this thread.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 09-16-2013, 04:22 PM
la90043 la90043 is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Los Angeles 90043
Posts: 21
la90043 is starting off with a positive reputation.
best way to do this is to add an external vacuum reservoir and check valve. no cutting. no 2 hour job. just splice and connect to existing vacuum lines. 15 minutes. thats all it took.
Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2013, 04:22 PM
 
 
 
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
help with 09 E359 van SuperDutyScaler Super Duty & Heavy Duty 2 06-19-2014 10:13 AM
New member needing advice on 95 E-350 mikekfr 1968-2013 Full Size Vans 12 01-13-2014 07:51 AM
Easy cheap quick fix for Ford defrost/vent problems auric Cooling, Heating, Ventilation & A/C 11 10-28-2013 07:55 AM
this is how my heater- defroster works steve(ill) 1997 - 2003 F150 2 12-15-2005 07:35 PM
Missing Vacuum Hose -help AQUARIES1 1978 - 1996 Big Bronco 27 01-08-2004 09:35 AM


Go Back   Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums > Ford Vans and other vehicles > 1968-2013 Full Size Vans

Tags
2006, 99, ac, blower, box, clean, control, e250, f150, ford, head, heater, hvac, line, located, vacuum

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump


Participate In The Forums

Create new posts and participate in discussions. It's free!

Sign Up »





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7 AC1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertising - Terms of Use - Privacy Statement - Jobs
This forum is owned and operated by Internet Brands, Inc., a Delaware corporation. It is not authorized or endorsed by the Ford Motor Company and is not affiliated with the Ford Motor Company or its related companies in any way. Ford® is a registered trademark of the Ford Motor Company.

vbulletin Admin Backup