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Old 03-05-2011, 07:43 PM
sirnobody sirnobody is offline
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Best Way To Heat WVO to Make Biodiesel

Hey everyone,
I'm working on a prototype biodiesel processor which uses a pump to mix the wvo instead of physically stirring it. I had an idea to put a brass fitting in the middle of the tube and then attach a heating element to it, with insulation, to heat up the WVO as it passes through the tube. This is a bit different than the standard way of heating WVO by immersing a heating element into the WVO and I was wondering if anyone had tried this or which is more energy efficient or heats faster etc. any comments appreciated

Sirnobody
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Old 03-05-2011, 10:19 PM
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Think I read somewhere that bio attacks Brass... Fabman???
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Old 03-08-2011, 07:21 PM
tabascom16 tabascom16 is offline
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Water heating element does the job. Plus they are very cheap.
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Old 03-09-2011, 03:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sirnobody View Post
Hey everyone,
I'm working on a prototype biodiesel processor which uses a pump to mix the wvo instead of physically stirring it. I had an idea to put a brass fitting in the middle of the tube and then attach a heating element to it, with insulation, to heat up the WVO as it passes through the tube. This is a bit different than the standard way of heating WVO by immersing a heating element into the WVO and I was wondering if anyone had tried this or which is more energy efficient or heats faster etc. any comments appreciated

Sirnobody
Are you talking about an inline heater like the one below? They're great, just make sure your pump is running when it's on. Many prefer the inline heating set up.

Click the image to open in full size.Enlarged View of Product
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Old 03-09-2011, 03:17 PM
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Yep...works like that to inside a 1" pipe. Inline or in the side of your processor...either way it serves the same purpose.
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Old 03-09-2011, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by tabascom16 View Post
Yep...works like that to inside a 1" pipe. Inline or in the side of your processor...either way it serves the same purpose.
So is that the setup the OP is referring to? I am unclear as to what is meant by the brass fitting.
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Last edited by binuya; 03-09-2011 at 04:01 PM. Reason: improperly quoted term
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Old 03-09-2011, 09:56 PM
tabascom16 tabascom16 is offline
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It wouldn't matter if you used a brass, steel, cast iron, or whatever material for a fitting (he probably just had a brass unit on hand or is worried the chemicals in the process will eventually eat other materials). The heating element needs to be immersed in the oil no matter what its location is...either in the piping or in the reaction vessel. As long as you are circulating fluid past the heating element you will have a much more energy efficient unit than if the liquid were to stand still.

For example a chunk of ice will melt quicker in 60 degree water that is being circulated versus being immersed in 200 degree water that is just standing still.
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Old 03-10-2011, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by tabascom16 View Post
It wouldn't matter if you used a brass, steel, cast iron, or whatever material for a fitting (he probably just had a brass unit on hand or is worried the chemicals in the process will eventually eat other materials). The heating element needs to be immersed in the oil no matter what its location is...either in the piping or in the reaction vessel. As long as you are circulating fluid past the heating element you will have a much more energy efficient unit than if the liquid were to stand still.

For example a chunk of ice will melt quicker in 60 degree water that is being circulated versus being immersed in 200 degree water that is just standing still.
I understand how an inline heater works. I have one on my wash tank. My posts were actually directed at the OP.
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Old 03-10-2011, 12:30 PM
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Because of two small fires in my processor I switched over to indirect heating and now my oil never touches the eliment.
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Old 03-19-2011, 01:12 AM
sirnobody sirnobody is offline
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Sorry for the delay, I decided on an immersed one for my prototype biodiesel rig im making out of a an old paint can. Im going to step it up to a five gallon bucket later on since i dont have a diesel vehicle and im doing this more for the novelty than anything. I was referring to an inline heater versus a direct, in the main tank immersed, heater and was wondering which is more fuel efficient.
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Old 04-20-2011, 11:04 PM
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Going BIO frist time

Hi every body
I have a 1997 F-250 7.3 power stroke and want too go bio should I
use a 14% methenol or 22%
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Old 04-20-2011, 11:04 PM
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